Therapeutic Nutrition – Paradigm for 21st century Medicine

//Therapeutic Nutrition – Paradigm for 21st century Medicine

Does your doctor talk about nutrition? My guess is no. My feeling, as a physician, is that most doctors know very little about nutrition. Why not? We are in the midst of a huge paradigm shift in the entire way we look at health and disease. It’s happened so gradually that most doctors are not even aware of it. The physician’s path has been corrupted over the last few decades from ‘The person who keeps you healthy’ to ‘The person who gives you drugs and surgery’. Let me explain.

A physician’s job has always been to heal the sick and give advice on how to stay healthy. There were medical treatments, to be sure – leeching, purging, and my personal favorite – eating ground up powdered mummies. Yes. You read that correctly. For thousands of years, eating the ground up mummified remains of long-dead embalmed human beings was considered good medicine. That’s what they taught at them ancient medical schools. The demand for powdered mummies was so great that sometimes hucksters would simply grind up dead beggars and plague victims and sell them as mummies.

The history of medicine is the history of the placebo effect. This mummy-eating practice died out in the 16th century was was replaced by other equally useless procedures – such as the lobotomy to cure mental illness. Hey, let me shove this ice pick through your eyeball and mash up parts of your brain like I’m mashing a potato. The inventor of this procedure received the 1949 Nobel Prize for Medicine. This was the cutting edge of medicine circa 1949. Any criticism of this mashed-brain strategy could be legitimately met by “Did YOU win a Nobel Prize, buddy?”

The paradigm of medicine as a semi-useless and semi-horrifying profession began to shift with the development of antibiotics – starting with penicillin in 1928. Now, all of a sudden, we had an effective treatment for infectious disease, which had been the major medical problem of the 20th century. Doctors, for virtually the first time ever, had something reasonably useful to fight illness. Doctors had something better to offer than mummy extract or shoving sharp metal pointy things in through the eyeball. Yaaayyy!

Similarly, with the advent of modern anesthesia and surgical techniques, we had effective treatments for diseases like ruptured appendices and gallstones and so on. Prior to that, surgery was a grisly sight. There were no effective antibiotics, there was no effective anesthesia, and post operative complications were many. It was really just some guy with a saw, ready to cut your leg off, giving you a rope to bite down on so you didn’t scream. You were just as likely to die of the surgery as of the disease. Surgery was the last option, because the treatment was just as lethal as the disease. You went into the barber shop to see the guy with the rusty scalpel he just picked up off the filthy bloodstained tray. Many times, you never came back out.

By the middle of the 20th century, this all changed. The concepts of germs and the importance of antiseptics were discovered. Anesthetic agents were discovered. Penicillin and other miraculous antibiotics were discovered. Public hygiene and sanitation were improved. So, the doctor patient relationship changed. Now, physicians saw ourselves as the fix-it guy or fix-it girl.You have a disease, I give you a pill. You get better. Or – you have a disease, I give you surgery. You get better.

This worked really well from the 1940s to the 1980s. Most of the major health issues were infectious diseases. From bacterial pneumonia, to bacteria like H. Pylori, to viruses like HIV, to Hepatitis C – people were getting better. You can see this clearly in the life expectancy of people 65 years and older (this removes the effect of child mortality and wars etc., concentrating on chronic disease).

During this time, medical school training reflected this new role that physicians saw themselves. We wanted to know about drugs, and surgery, and more drugs and more surgery. Obesity, a dietary disease should be treated with, I know, drugs! If that doesn’t work, then, I know, surgery! To the doctor with a hammer, all problems are nails.

Nutrition training is virtually non existent in medical school. During residency (the 5 years of training after medical school) it was completely non existent. We didn’t learn about it, so we didn’t care about it and we didn’t care to learn about it. Nutrition was just not part of the vocabulary. Being a doctor meant “I don’t care about nutrition” because that’s what the medical school taught me (and everybody else in my medical school class) – not overtly, mind you, but we were the fix-it guys and girls. The drugs and surgery gang. Not the nutritionists. Which was fine, as long as the major health problems were infections and surgical problems.

Things changed by the end of the 20th century. The big problems were no longer infectious diseases. Starting in the late 1970s we had a massive obesity epidemic. Then 10 years later, a massive diabetes epidemic. Our drugs and surgery tools were completely inadequate to deal with this new reality. We tried to apply the 20th century attitude to the new 21st century medical problems, which are largely obesity related and metabolic in nature. We tried – You have type 2 diabetes, let me give you a pill (or insulin). It was a dismal failure. We tried – You have obesity, let me give you surgery. It works, kind of. But there are a lot of complications.

So, we, as doctors, were lost. We were reduced to giving simple, puerile, and utterly ineffective advice like “Eat Less, Move More”, or “Count your calories” or “It’s all about the Calories”. We lacked comprehension of the problem. We didn’t understand obesity and its hormonal nature, and we didn’t know how to treat it. So, most of us gave up. We admitted defeat by trying to pretend that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. We pretended that obesity is a natural consequence of aging even though it had never happened on this scale in human history. Both statements, of course, are completely false. Losing weight often reversed type 2 diabetes, so we told people to lose weight, but we didn’t tell them how to lose weight.

Without any training, we gave the only advice we knew – Eat Less, Move more. This is rather ironic, considering that all available evidence from our studies shows that restricting calories is a completely ineffective method of weight control (see article – The Lack of Evidence for Caloric Restriction). We introduced non-physiologic concepts from physics like calories to try to explain weight loss (see article – The Useless Concept of Calories). We knew that about 99% of the time, this Caloric Reduction as Primary strategy failed, but we didn’t care. It was the best we had, so that’s what we gave.

But there is hope. More and more doctors are starting to recognize that the related conditions of the metabolic syndrome which are all closely related to obesity are treatable, not druggable conditions. This includes obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. You can’t treat a dietary disease with drugs. So the weapon of choice for metabolic problems of the 21st century is not a new drug or a new type of surgery, although there are many who try to medicalize a dietary problem. No, the best option is to treat the root cause. Treat the dietary disease with correction of the underlying diet.

The weapon of choice in 21st century medicine will be information. Information far beyond the simplistic notions of calories. Information about the ancient practice of fasting. Information about the dangers of excessive fructose intake. Information about reducing refined foods especially carbohydrates. Information about the hormonal basis of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

And the great news is that this information is not limited to doctors, but can be found by anybody with an internet connection. That is precisely the point of this blog, its related books and related podcast – detailed discussion about the science of obesity, the science of nutrition, the science of type 2 diabetes. That is precisely the point of our online Intensive Dietary Management program. Nutrition as a therapeutic option for nutritional diseases. That is the future of medicine.

 

2017-12-05T11:07:34+00:00 55 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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55 Comments on "Therapeutic Nutrition – Paradigm for 21st century Medicine"

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cindy
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I have read Dr. Fung’s book on IF and am almost finished with his book The Obesity Code. I am a retired ICU nurse, have had type II diabetes for about 12 years. I am so thankful to have run across Dr. Fung. His Obesity Code book has the best explanation I have EVER found on insulin resistance, which is a new concept since I went to school. No one I’ve ever asked before has been able to give me any explanation of how it all works. I have had 3 different physicians try to get me to take statins,… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest

While doing supervised medical dryfasting to heal the body I caught a BBC program about intermittent fasting and the various options. Then I somehow discovered on Facebook, Gin Calhoun Stephen’s “Delay, Don’t Deny” group and I’ve never looked back. A “Clean Fast” is what it’s all about, healthwise 🙂

cindy
Guest
Ckaralee-Thanks for the tip on clean fasting. I will order the Delay, Don’t Deny book as I am not on facebook, but I googled and read some of Gin’s blog entries just now and her argument is compelling. I am quite satisfied with only 1 or 2 cups of coffee in the morning, but I do use cream and Xylitol. I will try black coffee but right now it seems really gross to me! I fell into intermittent fasting accidently about a year ago, while we were on a motor home trip, before even reading anything about it. It just… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest
Hello, Cindy, yes losing 10lbs on a vacation eating what you wanted is quite a miracle 🙂 Gin also has a podcast and a blog together. Her FB group is a riot- everyone as pleased as pigs, lol! Good point about the black coffee – a frequent complaint with lots of discussion, and the old timers encouraging the newcomers. My OMAD/IF is 22/2 and during my IF I don’t intake food nor drink because I am quite practiced at dryfasting due to some serious health issues that require a more aggressive handling, but her OMAD/IF is my in-between lifestyle and… Read more »
cindy
Guest

OK, the past 2 days I did not have xylitol in my coffee. I did have a little cream. (One step at a time ) It was actually tolerable without sweetener.

Jack Wall
Guest

If you use heavy cream rather than half and half, because heavy cream has no carbs it won’t knock you out of your weight loss cycle (i.e. ketosis).
Just go easy on it as it is high in fat.

cindy
Guest
Hi Ckaralee, I wanted to give you an update. We have arrived home now and have almost unloaded the RV. (big job) I continue to not have any artificial sweetener and have adjusted ok to coffee with a little cream. In the past week, I am down 5#. My fasting blood sugars have gone from the 130s to 111 today. I am eating OMAD on some days but for some reason yesterday I was a little hungry and/or anxious? in the early afternoon so I ate half a tuna sandwich and some raw sauerkraut-which gave me an IF window of… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest
Hi, Cindy. Isn’t it amazing what the body can do when it is clean fasting? Are you in Gin’s group now? They are very encouraging and their before and after photos too. I’m prepping for a longer fast to heal some more serious issues, and once that is accomplished I will probably be on the OMAD/IF for life – it’s that simple and easy. You might start to notice your palate changing too and eventually black coffee will start to taste okay. People in her group start to explore coffee’s and there is some discussion about which coffee is the… Read more »
cindy
Guest

Hi,
I am not in Gin’s group I guess, if you mean on Facebook. I don’t really do any social networking (unless you count this 🙂
I did get Delay Don’t Deny and am almost finished with it. And I have been browsing on her blog. I continue to see my blood sugars improve. I think I can do the 22/2 pattern without problem long-term. And I do not miss the artificial sweeteners. In fact, I tasted something the other day that had stevia in it, and the taste was sickening to me.
Hey, have a merry Christmas!

Ckaralee
Guest

Hey, Cindy, you have a great Christmas too – not denying yourself any of those nostalgia foods that suddenly pop up during this holiday season. Maybe you start to notice your tummy shrinking?
People sometimes take an OMAD break during holiday family gatherings to be socially complementary, and then resume OMAD.
Yes, I feel you about the stevia – used to purchase it at $50/lb from NOW company, but it doesn’t taste the same anymore.
It’s been a pleasure knowing you :-))

Nate
Guest

BTW, I’m happy that Drs. Phinney, Volek, and Fung are having an scientific discussion of fasting. That is how science advances. Having read and listened to all three of these doctors, I’m guessing that the discussion will be respectful and educational for everyone.

My motto: It’s the insulin, stupid.

Alexandre
Guest
I know this is just another comment in the multitude of people following this blog, but I cannot tell you how much all of this is so right… I have been diagnose with T2D twelve years ago, I am 48. I have been overweight all my life. I would probably have been T2D ten years before they found it if I had not been exercising like crazy and eating healthy food (no sugar, no junk, just whole food, whole grain), still, two years ago I was close to 300 pounds, and whatever I was doing, A1C was increasing, and doctor… Read more »
Ibrahim Alalou
Guest

I agree. I am riding the fasting trend and noticing excellent results.

Frank
Guest

This is brilliant and funny – and from personal experience I know that this type of dietary approach works. In the UK we are fighting to save our NHS from privatisation and more influence from big business and drug companies, at the same time we also need to campaign for public medicine to become smarter in the way that it deals with diabesity.

Mary
Guest

When a beloved pet is brought to a veterinarian the vet normally asks what the animal has been eating. Human doctors might learn a bit from a vet.

Evelyn
Guest

Bravo Dr Fung! Excellent article and a terrific look back at medical care. It all makes perfect sense when you explain it. I will be sharing this.

Dan Brown
Guest

It’s a very exciting time. Thank you, Dr Fung, for your leadership.

Peter Calka
Guest

I am on the wagon. In 2 months I lost about 6 inches on my belly, I feel great and hope soon to be 100% of medications. THX whole team and especially Dr Jason Fung

Tara
Guest

I couldn’t agree with you more. We (the people:-)) are fed up with the lack of expertise from the so called “experts”. Thanks to the internet and great communities such as this one, we can share knowledge. It’s incredibly powerful! By refusing to accept the status quo of the current medical model we can and will influence what that model looks like in the future. Thanks for sharing this history!

Lindsay T
Guest
I am in medical school right now and this was so refreshing to read. The “nutrition” we were taught was in the format of a brief online module that was filmed in the 90s. Our lecture on “cardiovascular disease risk reduction” was just a 50 minute tutorial on how to prescribe statins. I find myself becoming extremely frustrated that there is almost no mention of prevention in any of our preclinical courses. It gives me so much hope to read articles written by physicians who have noticed the ineffectiveness of our current medical education system. As you describe in this… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest

I worked for a firm that consulted physicians and at the symposiums the pharma-reps were on the doctors like fleas on a dog. Due to serious health issues, aided by unknowing doctors, I decided to do my own studies into the human body. I came upon the russian studies and applications into medical dryfasting. I have not looked back and the body is on the path to correcting, first de-toxing and then re-setting the whole endocrine system. These are wonderful times and thank god for the internet for those who choose to learn autodidactically.

Sue
Guest

I have had an A1C of over 10 for the past year.
I started intermittent fasting on Friday. I had a low carb dinner didn’t eat the rest of the day. My fasting blood sugar was 239. My fasting blood sugar on Saturday was 167. My fasting blood sugar on Sunday is 146.

I wait until my blood sugar is under 130 before eating and eat low carb. I am hopeful that this will work.

TorontoGP
Guest
As a physician, I want to point out that it’s not just a lack of nutrition education in medical school that is leading to ignorance. When I was in Med school they made a huge effort to increase our nutritional training and we spent many hours on the curriculum. The problem, as I see it, is misinformation. Ask any dietitian how to eat healthy and they will quote a low fat diet with grazing throughout the day and not skipping meals and having fructose rich smoothies that have lost their fibre. And these are people who did an entire degree… Read more »
bgh
Guest

LOL mummy grinds! Gross. This mode of thought is still around today, homeopathic. But this is very much related to nutrition. It’s very awesome that Dr. Fung takes stock of nutrition, it just boggles my mind that physicians would NOT consider nutrition! Huh? What you feed your body? But I do understand that there needs to be logic, science.
There will always be folks taking advantage of the nutritional aspect; the miracle cure/food/drug etc. The internet can be a wacky place. Hence we need objective science-based truth-based researchers, doctors, etc. with fact-based reality. Thank you Dr. Fung.

Nate
Guest

Yes, Bravo, Dr. Fung. It was an excellent article and I’ll also post it on FP.

Sumara Marie
Guest
Thank you so much, Dr. Fung. I knew some of the physicians past, however, I so, got it. OMG so bazaar ~ Your explanation was so clear, I experienced the truth of it like never before. I have intuitively been very skeptical of them. Now, seventy-seven years old and take no medication, at all. I do have emphysema and use the herbal spray I inhale, created by Dr. Group. It works. I have myself on a good diet, soups, and salads, only organic. Lots of turmeric and ginger tea that I dehydrate myself so I know what I am putting… Read more »
Srinath
Guest

I understand doctors dont get diet education in medical school. However I find that dietiticians seem to be very very far into the “eat less” or “eat this not that” and are completely wrong because they are still in the calorie reduction line of reasoning.

Ibrahim Alalou
Guest

My results in the link below.

John Redmon
Guest
Talk about paradigm shifts. Today (12/5/2017), Drs. Phinney and Volek (nutritional ketosis gurus) put out a paper basically debunking fasting: http://blog.virtahealth.com/science-of-intermittent-fasting/. Those two researchers got me started on the ketogenic road. I came to Dr. Fung through Peter Attia and Valter Longo and I’m currently experimenting with fasting. Recently I completed a 5-day water-only fast around the Thanksgiving holiday (losing eight pounds – I’m 6’1″ and 168 pounds). I exercise a ton – hard (endurance swimming and biking, and weight lifting). I wondered if fasting would affect my level of fitness and exercise. Well, I spent the entire five days… Read more »
EvgeniaBB
Guest
That’s an interesting article and I’d be happy to see answers to your questions too. But I see at least two big problems there. The first one had been pointed at by doctor Fung many times – the fact that Minnesota experiment was more calorie restriction rather than fasting. And the second one is that it treats 36h fasting the same way as longer fasts and something that needs to be compensated. Daily nutritional macros aren’t at all important. Otherwise people would start losing their muscles only because of eating their breakfast a couple of hours later at the weekend.… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest
Dr. Fung, because of the patients he has, does not talk much about long fasting and certainly not about dryfasting. Before all this data started coming out about OMAD/IF I had already started to address serious body issues with first long water fasts (47 days in one case) and then caught onto dryfasting and really liked it, and average 13 days 24/7 dryfasting cycles – drop down to OMAD/IF to hydrate and prep for the next dryfasting session. But, then I am very studied now on the subject and know when to go and when to stop and how to… Read more »
Shaw
Guest
John, You are discovering this b/c it’s obvious you’re actually “doing” what is recommended … you are seeing the natural and logical outcome. I’m convinced the VAST majority of people in these forums have no genuine understanding of HARD training … and they shouldn’t b/c this is an eating paradigm for sick people and for maintenance living. I intermittent fast every day and completely fast on Tuesdays and Thursdays. I assure you of two things: 1. I’m very lean with very little fat OR muscle mass. 2. There is NO way I could keep up my old hard core gym… Read more »
Jo Jensen
Guest

Glad that works for you Shaw, and perhaps I am an exception, but when I do two day fasts or my regular 15-17 hour intermittent fasts, I can and do have the motivation to run or hike up to 7 miles a day plus yoga and strength training on other days. I also have done 7-day backpacking trips in the Grand Canyon while intermittent and 5:2 fasts. And had no problem. And I am 59.

David Nyman
Guest
Well I must say that’s not been my experience. I’m in my late sixties and have been doing IF daily for 20 years. No all day fasts though. I do a little less exercise (more efficiently, hopefully) these days through choice, but for most of that time I would be doing daily fasted workouts of up to an hour’s duration, sometimes longer, occasionally a lot longer. I never bothered about the timing of post workout nutrition either. Running, sprints, interval work, HIIT, kettlebell-style stuff, bodyweight strength work. Never had any problem generating intensity or duration. I’m no bodybuilder but I… Read more »
John Redmon
Guest
Shaw! Thank you for that excellent response! I’m my own guinea pig and I continually look for what works best en route toward optimal health. For perspective, I’m a 54-year-old vegetarian eating a diet that’s 95% organic. Almost every day my lunch is a two-pound organic salad with 32 ingredients. I bounce in and out of ketosis due to endurance exercise and a predominately LCHF diet. I graduated from college with four science majors (BIO, CHM, GEO, ENV). The science behind optimal living interests me greatly and I spend a lot of effort seeking it out. And I dig deep,… Read more »
glib
Guest

That blog says the exact opposite of what Dr Fung has been preaching. Now it does (possibly intentionally) not mention muscle mass directly, but only N loss. That is the N from autophagy, which is mostly junk N. Also, there is no mention in the link of any recent paper by phinney or anyone else since the most recent paper quoted there is from 2005. Is Big pharma getting worried that they are sending trolls?

donny
Guest
Given the amount of lean mass Phinney and Volek are talking about losing, there’s just no way to get there without decreased muscle protein mass. No trolls involved here, although people who like to troll the fasting and low carb communities will love the infighting. Phinney is just making the worst-case argument. It depends on the study you work from. Figure 1 gives nitrogen losses ranging between 11 and 14 grams per day, that’s a range of 68.75-87.5 grams of protein per day., lean and obese people it says. Cahill did a study in the 60s with lean divinity students,… Read more »
Jason Mehrvarz
Guest
Couple of thoughts on this. Is this your first 5 day fast? Fasting is METABOLIC exercise. You have to do it with a certain frequency in order to get good at it. Fasted exercise is awesome! I went KETO 4 years ago, but plateaued 2 years ago. I was still about 25 pounds overweight. Then I began fasting more often than feasting (e.g. 4-6 hour eating window every day with the occasional 40-48 hour fast) and everything changed. The weight loss continued and I have made it to my ideal weight and body fat specifically. So maybe it is just… Read more »
Margaret
Guest

Dr Fung’s book is what got me into keto and intermittent fasting. It to has saved my life. My dr didn’t believe I was trying to lose weight (done every diet imaginable! I have lost 35 lbs now with 25-30 to go), and I am 70 yrs old!

Jo Jensen
Guest
Try moderating (switching over) to an intermittent fast and you will soon discover you not only have more motivation and energy but will have bursts of it that will blow you away. I am very very active and committed to training daily. I fast from 7p to 12p every day and I have plenty of energy and actually perform better physically and mentally than I ever have. I think it may because my body now accesses the reserves I carry (body fat). I can eat like a starving hound dog during my off fast hours and still maintain the same… Read more »
Alan
Guest

There might be more to your experience – I’m an avid exercise addict type – I did a 7 day water fast and each day I did some intense activity, rock climbing, weight lifting, , cardio , sauna – and I was surprised that I could maintain my energy levels for that long – However, perhaps the difference in our experiences is that I have been in ketosis for 2 years – doing intermittent fasting. The key is adaptation over a long period.

Ckaralee
Guest

Yes, changes in the body over a long period is the key point and I haven’t seen any good studies but have read lots of posts from people like yourself who, as they get cleaner, get stronger and with more mental clarity. It is my experience too and I usually fast without water or food for on average 13 days – due to some serious health issues – dropping to OMAD/IF in between dryfasting cycles. These are MEDICAL DRYFASTS for serious health issues and I’m making great progress, very pleased.

cindy
Guest
John, Holy Cow! I went to the link you cite, then read about all the people on the board of Virta. it reads like a Who’s Who of gurus in charge of diabetic management nationaly and ADA dweebs, who have done such an abysmal job of patient education and management for the past 30 years or so. There is a lot of fear mongering on there about the muscle loss in fasting-guess they need to read The Obesity Code? Mainstream medicine should be ashamed of what they are doing to diabetic patients still today. A few months ago, my primary… Read more »
BernardP
Guest
Drs. Phinney and Volek are in “scare them” mode, brandishing the old lean-tissue-loss bugaboo. Well, my wife has been doing three 24-hour fast a week for three years and after losing 23 pounds, has stabilized her weight at he same level it was 30 years ago. She has only lost fat and is in better physical shape (especially endurance) than she was 20 years ago. Her blood glucose and cholesterol show marked improvements, although, of course, cholesterol levels don’t matter. As for myself, being thinner at the start, I have been doing one 24-hour fast a week, because I know… Read more »
Kevin
Guest
I’m on my second micronutrient fast. First one last month was for 14 days and this one is now into day 5. What I have not been able to find is what is the long term implications of fasting on metabolic rate. Unless I’ve missed something most of the studies seem to focus on 24-72 hr “fasts” and then go into mixed messages by using the term “fast” and “starvation” in the same sentence when the two are not the same. It seems clear that a 24-48 hour fast will, at least temporarily, drive metabolism up. But what actually happens… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest
Sometimes while fasting the body, for whatever reason, wants to rest. However, in my own experience with long fasting cycles, and even with long dryfasting cycles, sometimes I am full of energy and can haul water and chop wood and be on top of my game mentally too. But when I first started fasting last year the body often just wanted to rest, but now my adrenal glands are not as sub-par as they used to be, but the body is still doing a deep cleaning on the gut. You might be better off doing an OMAD/IF diet. That is… Read more »
Margaret A. Syverson
Guest

I appreciate your candid and important posts, books, and videos. I hope you saw this article which supports what you are teaching:
Lifestyle Changes Not a Magic Pill can reverse Alzheimers
https://aeon.co/ideas/lifestyle-changes-not-a-magic-pill-can-reverse-alzheimers

John Redmon
Guest
Shaw! Thank you for that excellent response! I’m my own guinea pig and I continually look for what works best en route toward optimal health. For perspective, I’m a 54-year-old vegetarian eating a diet that’s 95% organic. Almost every day my lunch is a two-pound organic salad with 32 ingredients. I bounce in and out of ketosis due to endurance exercise and a predominately LCHF diet. I graduated from college with four science majors (BIO, CHM, GEO, ENV). The science behind optimal living interests me greatly and I spend a lot of effort seeking it out. And I dig deep,… Read more »
Geoffrey Levens
Guest
Nutrition Geek
Guest

Yes, I totally agree. But we need more information on micro nutrients as well as macro.

Ckaralee
Guest

I’m finding answers to micro-nutrients over in the “gut biome” studies and discussions.

vjsinha
Guest

Hi Dr. Fung:

Can you please review this research? I have my suspicions. Also, it is a rat model. pdf available.

Improving Metabolic Health through Precision Dietetics in Mice
2 William T. Barrington1,2, Phillip Wulfridge3, Ann E. Wells9, Carolina Mantilla Rojas1,
3 Selene Y.F. Howe1, Amie Perry4, Kunjie Hua5, Michael A. Pellizzon10, Kasper D.
4 Hansen3,6,7, Brynn H. Voy9, Brian J. Bennett5, Daniel Pomp5, Andrew P. Feinberg3,
5 David W. Threadgill1,4

jaz
Guest
Dr Fung I cannot get push through a longer fast due to sudden onset of an excruciating sciatica-type lower back pain which is resolved by breaking the fast. It’s a similar pain I get just before a virus or illness. People have advised it is kidney or colon detoxing and to drink a mixture of ACV/baking soda to heal the kidneys. It did help but I was worried about ingesting that combo. It seems many fasters do get this backpain (google backpain fast and it seems a common problem). Do you know what it is? What do you think of… Read more »
Ckaralee
Guest

I am on a program of extended medical dryfasts and I always end the dryfast with lemon juice, baking soda in a glass of grape juice. It is the best thing I’ve ever done to end a long fast, however after several drinks I move into juices. The body makes its own sodium bicarbonate so let it do it, but short term the lemon juice/baking soda drinks save me a lot of pain in the gut and kidneys. Also, for the gut soothing I have psylliium husk and charcoal and clay in a glass of juice.

Pat
Guest
About six months ago I watched Dr. Fung’s YouTube interview with Dr. Mercola, then immediately ordered and read his book The Complete Guide to Fasting. I am now 130 lbs down from 170 lbs. I do either a 36 or 42 hour fast three days per week and I LOVE It! I have lots of energy both on fasting and non-fasting days even with a very physical job. I drink a raw vegetable, berry & seed smoothie and limit carbs on eating days but essentially eat what I want, including dessert if I feel like it. I was not diabetic,… Read more »