Debunking the Debunkers

The Medieval Crusades were a series of holy wars sanctioned by the Latin Church. It seems incongruous today, but the Catholic religion was used as justification to bring war, death and destruction to thousands of innocent people. The last time I checked, the Bible did not exactly espouse the use of brute force to subjugate other peoples. I don’t recall any passage in there that says “We will save the heathens even if we need to kill them to do it.”

I’m reminded of this same incongruity every time I read about some person in the media trying to ‘debunk’ some procedure or other. The most recent article in the Toronto Star celebrates how people like Tim Caulfield help the public by debunking celebrity culture. They perceive themselves to be ‘myth busters’, but in reality, they are selling the same pseudo-science they pretend they are ‘debunking’. Mythbusters was a long running show on television which would take a myth or saying or internet video and then proceed to perform extensive scientific testing to determine whether this myth was busted or confirmed. They would often spend weeks and thousands of dollars performing as rigorous experiments as needed. Most of the people online pretending to be ‘myth busters’ are just people who scream for attention and don’t perform any real science. They are simply trying to yell louder than the person they are trying to debunk.

Let’s take the well publicized example of the jade egg sold by Goop, a wellness site promoted by celebrity Gwyenth Paltrow. It sells a jade egg that may be inserted into the vagina for increased sexual energy for $66. There has been considerable controversy about this pseudoscience and many have taken up the role of ‘mythbuster’. So let’s see what real science looks like.

First, is there any evidence that the jade egg works? No. This is an unsubstantiated claim – a claim made without any evidence to back it up. Second, and this is just as important, is there any evidence that the jade egg does NOT work? No.  This, too is an unsubstantiated claim. This is not pseudo-science. There is no science at all. Science says that there is no evidence for and none against, so it’s simply unknown. But the ‘debunkers’ claim that the jade egg does NOT work and further may be dangerous. Therefore, these debunkers are engaging in the same unsubstantiated claim slinging as Goop. It is this complete hypocrisy that annoys me. Let me be clear. Do I think the jade egg works? No. But I don’t actually know, so I do not claim it either works or does not work.

What is needed to actually, scientifically debunk this claim? You need to gather a group of, say 100 women, and have half use a jade egg, and the other half use, say, a stone egg of the same weight. You would not let the women or the researcher know which egg they are using and then measure their sexual energy at some later date. If there is no difference, then, and only then, can you claim to have successfully debunked the jade egg. Did Tim Caulfield do any of these rigorous studies? Did Tim Caulfield carefully monitor a group of women who purchased the egg over several years and ask them if their sexual energy increased? Did Tim Caulfield perform a survey of jade egg users and compare them to a control group of women matched for age and see if there is any difference in sexual energy? Hardly. These studies actually take time and money. Tim Caulfield has done nothing of the kind. He values his own opinion as scientific and other’s opinion as just bunk, which allows him to denigrate others who are making some claim he disagrees with. He is doing exactly the same thing as Goop. Making unsubstantiated claims. That’s hypocrisy. I have nothing against Tim Caulfield, who I’m sure is a nice guy, I just hate intellectual hypocrisy.

So, is the jade egg harmful? The debunkers claim that it is potentially harmful and could harbor bacteria. Has there ever been a case in the last 200 years of the worldwide medical literature describing a case report of severe infection from a jade egg? No. Zero. There’s been lots of case reports of this happening for tampons, for example, but not for jade eggs. So, debunkers ignore the need for scientific evidence and instead engage in fear mongering using unsubstantiated claims once again, all the while, believing themselves to be champions of science. That’s hypocrisy.

Since there is no evidence either for or against the jade egg, then this question now falls to the clinician, the person who treats people. Here, the main question is not ‘Does this really work’ but instead it is ‘How’s that working for you?’. Remember that there is a powerful placebo effect. If I rub moisturizer on my son’s stomach for his tummy ache (which I do all the time), it will work in 30-50% of cases. The same is probably true for the jade egg. So, what is the risk: benefit ratio? The best thing that will happen is that it works as advertised (30-50% of cases). The worst thing is that you will waste $66 dollars. That’s actually not a bad tradeoff.

Compare this to the use of angioplasty for stable heart disease. These stents to open up heart arteries have been used for many decades to prevent heart attacks in patients with closed arteries. It’s an invasive procedure that has real risk of bleeding, infection and perforation/ death. It also was insanely expensive for both the equipment and doctors fees. Recently, several studies have conclusively shown that these procedures for stable patients is completely useless with the first studies being done in the 2007. So, here is a procedure that has scientifically been debunked. We’ve wasted billions of dollars and caused untold side effects over the last 10 years that doctors have continued to perform this largely useless procedure. Where were the debunkers? Wouldn’t this be better to debunk instead of largely harmless jade eggs?

Recently the US News came out with its annual ranking of ‘best diets’ from the ‘experts’. The highest ranked diet (DASH) is the same one you would expect to see in any mainstream publication, and not very different from the diets recommended by most physicians and dieticians. Cut your calories. Cut your salt. Moderation. Yadda yadda yadda. How’s that working out for us? Exactly. The words ‘obesity crisis’ comes to mind. Diets are constantly derided as ‘fad’ diets without any evidence whatsoever. Intermittent fasting, for example, is now derided as ‘dangerous’and potentially causing diabetes. Yes, eating nothing, which rests the pancreas (an organ involved in digestion) will damage it. I also cause wear and tear on my car as it sits in the garage. Right. Fasting – literally the oldest dietary intervention known to mankind is a dangerous 2000 year old  ‘fad’ promoted by ‘shills’ like Hippocrates (father of modern medicine), Benjamin Franklin, Buddha, Jesus Christ and the prophet Mohammed. Right.

What is usually lost in these sorts of rankings, though is the absolute, #1, most important question you must ask yourself for any diet. “How’s that working for you?” I’m not talking about some quest for ‘personalized medicine’ or ‘Eat the diet that is best for you’ nonsense. These sort of cop-out answers are not helpful because if we don’t know the best diet overall, how are you going to know the best diet for you? Similarly, personalized medicine is mostly just pie-in-the-sky fantasy rather akin to developing colonies on Mars. It’s great to sell product, but not great if you are counting on it to keep you healthy. For example, do we personalize the need for aspirin after a heart attack? Do we personalize the need for blood pressure control based on your own genetic makeup? Do we personalize your ideal body weight based on your family history? No, no and no.

Indeed, the entire field of evidence based medicine contradicts this personalized approach. Randomized trials, the gold standard of medical evidence is based necessarily on large groups of people, and are distinctly NOT personal.

The other thing that fascinates me is why so many people routinely use alternative medicine. Most of homeopathy, naturopathy etc. has little evidence to back up its claims. This does not mean it doesn’t work, it simply means that we do not know if it works or not. But clearly, the general public feels that this is equal to the ‘science’ of conventional medicine, of which I was trained for many years. Why?

Let’s consider three examples.

  1. The Opioid Crisis – Heavy promotion to doctors leads to extensive overuse of opioids which is killing lots of people today
  2. Angioplasty for stable heart disease – Extensively used by doctors for decades, costing billions of $$, highly invasive with many complications. Now proven to be largely useless
  3. Hormone Replacement Therapy – Millions of women given HRT in the mistaken belief it would reduce heart disease. Instead it caused blood clots and cancers with no benefits.

All three are examples that I recall vividly because I was taught in medical school about the benefits of all 3 of these widely accepted therapies that turned out to be extremely harmful to health. My mother was given hormone replacement therapy, which significantly increased her risk of breast cancer and heart disease. Where were the ‘debunkers’ when it comes to conventional medical advice? They are certainly loud enough when trying to prevent you buying a jade egg, but are nowhere to be heard when trying to actually save you from proven harm from the medical profession.

This is what I consider the greatest hypocrisy. The ‘debunkers’ pretend they are doing this to protect consumers from wasting their money on useless treatments. But what about the millions of dollars that are funnelled into paying doctors? Not a peep. What about the complete corruption of academic medicine? What about the fact that the doctors writing guidelines are taking hundreds of thousands of dollars from the drug companies? Not a peep. The reason people turn to alternative medicine is that they have a (correct) suspicion that doctors are simply pushing the ‘establishment rules’ and trying to sling mud on everybody else. We need to spend more time ‘debunking’ harmful stuff we currently do, like the disastrous dietary advice of counting calories, eating 6 times a day, never skip a meal, avoid intermittent fasting, always eat breakfast even if it is a highly processed sugar-laden cereal bar etc. and less time worrying about some largely harmless jade eggs. Doctors need to earn back the public’s trust.

2018-05-23T09:01:23+00:0084 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Lucy
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Lucy

Totally agree. In fact, I am scared of my doctor. just yesterday pushing cholesterol medicine in a 92 year old with chest pain. (it wasn’t a heart attack just stress) Then they tried to sell me an annual physical for a healthy 17 year old boy. Also they made a big deal in the 92 year old woman about a leaky valve. What are they going to do? She’s too old for an intervention. I already told them she didn’t have Congestive heart failure but they wasted a chest x ray looking for that. I stay away from doctors, even… Read more »

Stacey Ben
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Stacey Ben

I’m scared of my drug lord..ahem, I mean ‘doctor’s as well. And the latest thing they are doing is saying you will lose your insurance if you don’t submit to your doctors orders. For example, if you refuse statins.

Jeanne
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Jeanne

Fill out the ‘script….don’t take the pills. Easy.

lynn
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lynn

Where do you live? I haven’t heard that here, but would not be surprised to…

ess
Guest
ess

Yep. I recently got “fired” by my doctor. Why? Because I called her out for giving advice that clearly showed that she hadn’t bothered to give 2 seconds to the extensive patient history I had filled out. She stated that she could not do it because she has 600 patients. Amazing. And she couldn’t admit messing up and cutting corners, nope, she wasn’t able to admit screwing up and instead got rid of the horrible patient who actually expected her to do what she is paid to do. The profession is fundamentally corrupted by the monopoly granted by the State.

gpisabela
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gpisabela

I am sick of doctors in general – Canadian here. Basically most of the time I went to see the doctor was wasted. The only time I can remember it was useful, it was for my daughter’s strep throat for which she got antibiotics and she got well. But: – for excessive weight I got the “eat less move more” advice – luckily I informed myself online about low-carb; – for insomnia I got Zopiclone – worked for a few weeks only – turns out it’s pre-menopause, the naturopathic doctor gave me bioidentical hormones which provided relief from this and… Read more »

Stephen
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Stephen

Really liked this post. Calling out both sides is becoming extremely important these days as it seems people tend to argue from an emotional standpoint instead of looking at the data. This story https://www.afp.com/en/news/2265/world-faces-staggering-obesity-challenge-study-doc-1590mi1 came out yesterday regarding the increasing worldwide obesity epidemic, yet there is nothing mentioned about how to address it other than “individual countries must work on the best strategy for them”. It seems the general thinking is that people just aren’t following the advice they are given, when the evidence clearly shows the opposite. The problem is that the advice is bad….

clbrto
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clbrto

Spicy! Avoid small planes sir.

Tom Frei
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Tom Frei

Good science, but bad history. A majority of historians would paint a much different picture of the crusades.

Don dittmer
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Don dittmer

yes the crusades were a result of Muslims destroying and taking over Christian churches and holy sites and destroying them or turning into mosques,sound familiar?

Sheegs
Guest
Sheegs

Thank you for that comment, Tom. I will forgive Dr. Fung because he is relatively young and, therefore, has been subjected to revisionist history in his education. The Crusades were defensive battles waged against mohammedans who were attacking the holy sites of Christianity and assaulting and murdering Christian pilgrims who came to the Holy Land.

Mike B
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Mike B

FWIW, they did a number on the Zoroastrians in the Sassanid (Persian) Empire too. In the early Arab conquests, they were content to leave Christians and their churches in peace as long as the Jizya was paid.

Slartibartbast
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Slartibartbast

Without angioplasty I’d be dead you disingenuous cockwomble.

dolph
Guest
dolph

A few points:
-you may be right, but you don’t know for sure; medicine is not all cut and dry
-you are dead anyway, it will just take longer

If you have a problem with the second point, take it up with God.

Lancelot
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Lancelot

How do you know that?

Stephen
Guest
Stephen

A good example of “arguing” from emotion rather than science. In a N=1 case, there is no way to prove the efficacy of the procedure, perhaps it was simply the placebo effect,

Richard
Guest
Richard

You may be right about the surgical intervention, in terms of fixing an immediate medical emergency, but the plain fact is that the “treatment” itself has been shown to not really help very much, if at all, beyond keeping the patient alive for a few months or a year, or whatever. It is NOT a long term success worthy of the cost. Yes, there may have been some arterial blockage that needed to be undone, but the stents, etc. do little or nothing to resolve the causative issues. On a public health basis such a process is extremely wasteful. Individually… Read more »

Joanne
Guest
Joanne

I don’t think he was referring to emergency stenting, which of course has saved many, many lives.

Also, “cockwomble”, I may have to borrow that in the future.

Jessica
Guest
Jessica

I read The Guardian’s article when it came out, too. Have you shared your thoughts on some of the specific claims yet? I’d love to hear how you would debunk those warnings.. although I do have to say most people in the comments did seem skeptical of the study!

Peter Lavoie
Guest
Peter Lavoie

Sorry Dr. Fung, but that was the worst and unhistorical first paragraph you’ve written. Have you ever wondered why the ever conquering Muslims from that era did not over run Europe? The Crusades stopped their military advance and were an attempt to push them back.

Richard
Guest
Richard

Peter Lavoie: Opinions may vary on those issues.

Maire Hanlon
Guest
Maire Hanlon

All due respect to the good doctor, historical facts are not in his medical wheelhouse and should be avoided if he can’t get them straight. The Crusades began only in response to 400 years of unremitting Muslim attacks & persecution of Christians throughout the former Roman Empire. Fact, not opinion. Stick to medicine sir!

Kathryn
Guest
Kathryn

Thank you for that, Peter. I am not a Catholic and do not agree with the Catholic doctrine so, my horror at reading that first paragraph had nothing to do with any bias toward Catholicism. I was horrified to read that people still believe the lie that “The Church” went to “convert” innocent Muslims!! It was a Caliphate – a holocaust against Christians and Jews – that the Church was trying to stop. And thankfully, they did. For more info, start with Brigitte Gabriel’s “1400 Years of Islamic History in a Few Minutes”.

Jenny
Guest
Jenny

I thought it was an historical fact that the Catholic Church offered indulgences to anyone joining the crusades and promised entry into heaven for anyone who joined in the killing of ‘infidels’. This is not unusual inasmuch as most religions/cultures have used similar rhetoric at some point in time. So Dr Fung’s statement that “the Catholic religion was used as justification to bring war, death and destruction to thousands of innocent people” isn’t false as far as I can see. The Pope didn’t exhort people to “turn the other cheek” but instead to go to war. Whether that war was… Read more »

dolph
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dolph

I’m an internist myself, recently have had some anxiety attacks. I could go on and on about this but I’ll keep my points short. We are all deluded in various ways, and it’s not just medicine, though it’s a big part of it. Delusion is now part and parcel of American life, running through every nook and cranny and not sparing anyone or anything. That’s one of the reasons I don’t like immigrants, even though I embrace them as my fellow human beings. They are as deluded as anyone, chasing the American dream. All of their kids are going to… Read more »

MomOfWildeThings
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MomOfWildeThings

“They are doing the best that they can” really should read, “They are doing what the insurance company dictates/permits/approves and the prescribe what the associate pharmaceutical company manufactures.”

SGS
Guest
SGS

Ah, the wonderful, subtle, voice of reason. Dr. Fung, if you ever run for Pres in the USA, I will not only vote for you, I will give my time for your campaign. On a separate note, in the first 3 months of this year, I lost 30 lbs. eating one keto meal a day. In my entire life this is the only time I have ever had control of my weight. I will never have weight problems again. Thanks for everything, and I wish you all the best from Austin Texas.

Richard
Guest
Richard

SGS, Thanks for sharing you success story. As someone who also lost some weight on a low car/High fat diet, I suggest that you remain vigilant and disciplined. It is too easy to lose control and thereby regain weight, and I tend to think that there is an aspect of truth to the process/story of the body trying to hit/regain a set (former) weight. I don’t know if (increased?) exercise was part of your wright loss strategy and success, but… my recent reading of the NYTimes article (and personal experience) on set point and bones suggests to me that excessive… Read more »

M E
Guest
M E

SGS, I would love to support each other since you are in ATX like myself!

Tobias
Guest
Tobias

There is a problem with the call for science. The science itself is corrupt and ideology driven. I am for example in discussion with vegans who pull-out a lot of studies that claim vegan diets are healthy (at least in the abstract), but if you check the full text and data, there is nothing. The same with the claim that fat or meat is bad unhealthy. A lot of studies to cite, but if you check their data it disappears. But the headline is set. So, just calling for a peerreviewed article is not helpful in the discussion. And when… Read more »

Stephen Nelson
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Stephen Nelson

And here is todays exhibit: https://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/bad-news-sausage-bacon-booze-12585028

When their recommenation is to eat lots of whole grains, I know I don’t have to read any further.

Jack
Guest

I agree whole heartedly. I cringe every time I have a discussion and someone pulls out the old “show me the peer reviewed study!”

Why? There will be multiple to defend each point. You will still believe whichever one confirms your own bias so why would I waste my time?

Michael
Guest
Michael

You should look into the „null hypothesis“. There is a difference between saying „not X“ and „I reject X until proven“.

Kathleen Sullivan
Guest
Kathleen Sullivan

I do not agree with your rundown on HRT. 3 of the lines on the graph are referring to ONLY estrogen therapy, which is very dangerous when unopposed (ie: given the necessary progesterone). But the top line shows both hormones. It’s a little like comparing apples and oranges.

I think this required a full story on hormone replacement now that people are (or should be) more confused. Let’s debunk this graph.

Richard Bennett
Guest

Dr. Fung blames the obesity crisis on the DASH diet. Where’s the evidence?

Joanne
Guest
Joanne

Well, probably not ALL of the obesity crisis. Please don’t wump me, I’m saying this in a mildly amused voice.

Richard Bennett
Guest

It’s also colossally stupid of Fung to compare fasting to leaving your car in the garage. Unlike the car, the body’s motor never stops running and fasting – especially long-term fasting – can cause liver, kidney, and heart damage, excessive ketones and cortisol, and even death by hypoglycemia for diabetics. Who gave this man a medical license?

Stephen
Guest
Stephen

Here’s the thing about analogies, they aren’t intended to be exact comparisons (analogy: a comparison of two otherwise unlike things based on resemblance of a particular aspect)

Having said that, I will grant you that a better analogy would have been to compare a car idling at a stop light with one racing around at top speed. Which one incurs more damage? Does idling your car cause wear and tear? Of course. Does idling your car cause more wear and tear than a car racing around at top speed? Hard to make that case.

Richard Bennett
Guest

Fasting is stressful; it’s more like a racing engine in a stationary car. Good way to overheat the bushings and throw a rod.

Richard
Guest
Richard

Exercise is stressful. Does that mean we should not exercise? Try looking up hormesis, or better yet, read this:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2248601/

Werner K Kujnisch
Guest
Werner K Kujnisch

You should try fasting before you comment on it. You need to lose some weight and how are you going to do it?

Moni
Guest
Moni

Fasting may be stressful but it is an excellent simple solution, especially in combination with keto (for me, at least). Fasting is for people who are informed, careful and self-loving. It’s for those who look for real solutions when evidence based medicine can only offer pills that treat symptoms. I am not a “useless pill” fan. Doctors, beware of patients who read, think, surf the net and question everything. I trust my own inner doctor more than anything else. In the end, it is my health and my body. If you don’t like fasting don’t do it, But it has… Read more »

paulsilva.mct
Member
paulsilva.mct

Richard, Fasting is not necessarily Stressful. I’m not at all Stressed when Fasting. I would like to see the Blind studies and results on this, statement Please.

Richard
Guest
Richard

Mr. Bennett: Colossally stupid? Dr. Fung occasionally needs some editing assistance and he sometimes gets a bit excited…but colossally stupid? No. The car “analogy” is just that: only an analogy. You want to argue with the analogy? Now THAT is CS, and pointless. As to all the risks from fasting: Really?? Fasting is an appropriate solution for serious medical issues that are presently not resolved well (if at all) by medicines. In short, fasting essentially removes the cause for these various issues and maladies. And fasting may well allow for the avoidance the medical and medicinal interventions. Maybe you need… Read more »

Richard Bennett
Guest

Gandhi.

Moni
Guest
Moni

Gandhi. And wasn’t his fasting powerful? Wasn’t that simple man powerful himself?

Jack
Guest
Jack

Completely in agreement that long term fasting can be very harmful. Too many elements that need to be accounted for. Many of the documented cases of non diabetic ketoacidosis are a result of fasting wether intentional or unintentional.

Short term fasting, less than 36 hours, can be dramatically beneficial but anything longer needs to be supervised by ampeofessional to ensure all needs are met to avoid complications.

Werner K Kujnisch
Guest
Werner K Kujnisch

Who gave you a medical degree? You obviously know nothing about long term fasting.

JohnM
Guest
JohnM

RB: “Where’s the evidence?”, “…especially long-term fasting – can cause…”

“Kettle, black”, there RB.

mumpfucious
Guest
mumpfucious

It really is funny how he uses junk science in an article to debunk junk science. We always hear people saying that these types of diets caused the obesity crisis while ignoring the fact that during this period McDonald’s sold an awful lot of Big Macs and KFC sold mass quantities of fried chicken and everyone was supersizing their sodas. As for “how’s that working for you”, whenever I have followed diets in the DASH/Med/WW range, I have had success. Studies on diets lately have shown that for people who stick to any diet over the span of a year,… Read more »

Fleur Brown
Guest

My lovely cleaning lady of 13 Years died of ovarian cancer because her GP prescribed HRT for her despite the fact her mother and older sister both were on HRT and died of ovarian cancer. She was on it for 4 years…before getting-ovarian cancer and had total faith the doctor was doing the best thing for her menopausal symptoms…
One would imagine he might of seriously thought there may be a genetic/ familial reaction.but in 7- 10min consultation he most likely missed that and in effect perhaps killed her !

Tracy Rodgers
Guest
Tracy Rodgers

Stop spreading anecdotal evidence. HRT does NOT cause ovarian cancer and it is not associated with growth of tumor in patients with ovarian cancer taking hormones. So frustrating how much time I spend undoing these ideas in my clinic. Women’s health is so misunderstood.

Gerry
Guest

I had stable angina and a chronic total obstruction of a right coronary a. My exercise tolerance was severely limited. I had a stent and a week later I was jogging and doing HIIT to total exhaustion without angina For me the procedure has been life changing
Be careful debunking these procedures with such a broad brush

Patrik
Guest
Patrik

Dear Jason, It’s a breath of fresh air and a cure for migraine to read your posts. And what do these charlatans do themselves? If you criticize vaccines you are a horrible quack putting babies at risk. So what is the scientific basis for such strong language? Turns out that the statistics for the diseases that vaccines are supposed to have cured have been in steady decline since the 19th century and the introduction of vaccines did not change the curves at all. Sometimes they even worsened them. So the effect seems to be zero. How about the risks? Vaccines… Read more »

Hap
Guest
Hap

Dr fung has generally useful advice but occasionally bad examples. The CDC has published opioid Rx rates through 2017. You can look up yourselves. Rates are substantially down even at VA…..ALMOST 40%. However cheap fentanyl from Mexico and China smuggled into USA at astronomical rates and amounts. SOME drs have proceeded recklessly……but let us all understand the facts. The fentanyl is often cut with heroin, meth, and some legit meds. The fact is that rx is now highly regulated and we have substantially an illegal drug trade…..at least for now.

Casey
Guest
Casey

Great article.. like your not letting critics run there mouth without a response.

Richard Bennett
Guest

Speaking of claims without evidence, this made me laugh: “The last time I checked, the Bible did not exactly espouse the use of brute force to subjugate other peoples.” Here’s a nice collection of Bible references to genocide. God’s favorite military tactic is genocide; he’s a bit of an extremist, like the anti-carbers, anti-vaxxers, and anti-GMOers of today. . And when the LORD thy God shall deliver them before thee; thou shalt smite them, and utterly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them, nor shew mercy unto them. Deuteronomy 7:2 . And thou shalt consume all the people… Read more »

Stephen Nelson
Guest
Stephen Nelson

My hat’s off to you for the details pointing out the inconsistencies in Dr Fung’s analogies. I can’t help but wonder what is really bothering you, that Dr. Fung is a little too casual about his analogies, or that you can’t really dispute the science behind his recommendations?

Richard Bennett
Guest

My initial comment was on Fung’s claim that the DASH diet created the obesity crisis. If you can kindly show me some evidence for it, we can leave the analogies and the faux-historical framing behind.

It’s typical for anti-carbers to invoke conspiracy theory to do the work for them that science won’t do. BTW, Kevin Hall has debunked Fung.

Stephen Nelson
Guest
Stephen Nelson
Richard Bennett
Guest

Lovely blog post; I especially liked this line: “The award-winning science journalist Gary Taubes believes that obesity is essentially a disease of too much insulin – hyperinsulinemia.” There’s nothing like a journalist to explain science to the masses, is there?

Ignore Fung’s text and look at Hall’s chart. EE rose from day 5 – 10, then crashed. Hall discusses this in his paper.

Duane
Guest
Duane

You question Taubes’ credentials–what are yours?

Jenny
Guest
Jenny

Richard Bennett, you state that “EE rose from day 5 – 10, then crashed. Hall discusses this in his paper.” I wondered about this and so went to the source material.
You are right that EE rose and then dropped again, but it *did not drop below the original base line*. Throughout the trial, EE remained higher than the baseline taken while subjects were on a Standard American Diet.

Richard Bennett
Guest

The difference between EE post-crash and baseline was not statistically significant.

lynn
Guest
lynn

And what pharma company do you work for!!!

Rebecca
Guest
Rebecca

You’re a kidney specialist – what gives you the special knowledge to advise people on obesity and weight loss?

Joan
Guest
Joan

Regarding IF, I am wondering if anyone else has encountered this problem. I am a female, age 43. Never been overweight. Never had gestational diabetes. No family history of diabetes. Yet, I am one of those for whom IF has had the opposite effect. It has INCREASED my blood glucose, fasting levels, HbA1c and post prandial levels. I am close to prediabetic now. 🙁 I started IF about 2 years ago for the purposes of autophagy, reducing inflammation, etc. I DID NOT need to lose weight. At that time, I was 110 lbs. on a 5’2′ frame. I am now… Read more »

Werner K Kujnisch
Guest
Werner K Kujnisch

I eat only one meal a day. For breakfast, I eat one pound of raw beef and 6 raw egg yolks. I have no blood sugar issues and have never felt better. I’m 71 years old and had open heart surgery 4 years ago to repair an aortic aneurysm and replace a worn out aortic valve. I’ve been zero carb ever since.

Sara
Guest
Sara

This is why I believe that Dr. Fung isn’t 100% right on his theory. His theory is that being obese means you are insulin resistant. But I believe there is a specific cause for insulin resistance that is just as prolific as obesity — that is – excess calcium in the blood stream. Every cell has “insulin receptors” like doors that open the cell. When insulin goes into the receptors, like a key, it opens the doors to let sugar in. Calcium gunks up the works and blocks, slowly, over time, the receptors – the key hole. Over time, you… Read more »

Carolina Flickinger
Guest
Carolina Flickinger

Most physicians I work with are good people wanting to truly help people, but going against convention causes a lot of problems raining down on their head. Real evidence needs supported and pushed ahead.

Tracy Rodgers
Guest
Tracy Rodgers

Hello Dr Fung and thank you for a great article. I do feel, however that you need to update you information on Hormone replacement therapy as you are providing outdated information. When you make statement like HRT has “no benefit” that is extremely detrimental to women suffering in the menopause transition. Hormone replacement therapy does not cause heart disease and cancers in the simplistic way that you describe. As an obstetrician gynecologist I fight misinformation about hormones all the time. I am disappointed to see it here.

Kaydie
Guest
Kaydie

Both as a woman currently facing ovarian cancer (post HRT) and as a registered psychologist, I couldn’t agree more. Thank you Dr. Fung for taking on the responsibility of trying to set things right in our current medical, business and political environments of Greed-to-the-point-of-selling-others’-lives-for-profit at the highest levels of public welfare, where ethics have long since managed to quietly slip out the back door. I’ve just read through many of the comments on your excellent article and it seems the public has, to a large extent, taken it as justification for attacking doctors in general (in a similar vain to… Read more »

Dr. Tracy Rodgers
Guest
Dr. Tracy Rodgers

Hello Dr. Fung, I am curious as to how long comments have to await moderation. I posted a comment with regards to your statements about hormone replacement therapy and it is absent from your comments section. Do I simply need to be patient, or do you censor your blog? I am a Canadian trained Obstetrician Gynaecologist and I am a member of diet doctor. I have adopted a low carbohydrate high fat diet myself and my family are beginning to join me as they clearly see the benefits. I am recommending diet doctor to my patients on a daily basis… Read more »

Alexander Desilets
Guest
Alexander Desilets

I really wish Dr Fung would devote some of his time to speaking with politicians in Canada, or at the very least, Ontario in order to get the education to where it really counts: In schools. Right now, children in this country are being put on track for severe health problems. Childhood obesity is at an all time high and it’s got to stop.

Tracy Rodgers
Guest
Tracy Rodgers

Hello Dr Fung, Me again. It appears you do not wish to publish my comments about hormone replacement therapy or perhaps the moderation process is very lengthy for this blog, which is unfortunate. I guess I agree with a lot of what you said and I would add that technically if you don’t do the research you can’t say that something is not true. (As in your example of the jade egg). However, the onus of proof lies with the individual making the extraordinary claims. If gwenyth wants to sell jade eggs, the onus is on her to prove they… Read more »

Tracy Rodgers
Guest
Tracy Rodgers

How embarrassing. I see they are all published. Didn’t realize that the order was new comments at the bottom of the thread. My sincere apologies. I’m a bit fascinated by the different responses. It is an interesting time to be in medicine for sure.

Kristina Statler
Guest
Kristina Statler

Wow. Awesome. Yes.

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MC
Guest
MC

Slow. Clap.

Well said, Dr. Fung, well said!

Rebecca Hill
Guest
Rebecca Hill

My thoughts exactly. Thank you, Dr. Fung. My personal quest for over 45 years, except for bearing children 3 times, has been to make choices to keep me away from the clutches of the doctors. …BTW, I’m on day 4 of a fast, thanks to your book, and doing OK.

Sara
Guest
Sara

While I get Dr. Fung’s point I think he is being a bit disingenuous. These de-bunkers don’t do it for the “science” they have monetized their debunking. It is no different than Dr. Fung wanting his thoughts to be right because he has monetized them and makes money off it. If Dr. Fung was proven wrong on any of his theories would be he so easy to change? I doubt it. It isn’t about the science necessarily it is foremost about his status and industry and THAT my folks is killing medicine.

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Lockhart Mary
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Lockhart Mary

I’ve come to appreciate that fasting is agnostic to what I’m now calling “Food Theology”.

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Google

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