How to Eat: Fast and Break-Fast

Several interesting recent studies regarding meal timing that deserve some attention. The first study, part of the Adventist Health Study 2, looked at a large cohort of relatively healthy people. Adults (>30 years old) attending Seventh-Day Adventist Church completed health questionnaires every 2 years. Over 50,000 people participated, and this particular study looked at meal timing and its relationship to body weight.

There is a very widely held opinion that eating more frequently will help reduce weight over time. However, there is virtually no data to support this assumption, and it has gained reputability only through mindless repetition. At first glance, it sounds pretty stupid.

You should eat constantly to lose weight? How does that work? That’s like saying you should spray your clothes with water more often so that it dries faster. Eating more often generally results in more overall food intake. And increased food intake is not highly likely to make you lose weight. Nevertheless, frequent repetition by authority figures can convince us of anything.

So this study looked closer look at this relationship. Not surprisingly, the more frequently you ate, the heavier you are likely to be. Doesn’t really seem like rocket science. If you constantly eat meals and snacks, you will gain more weight. No sh**, Sherlock. The advice to eat constantly to lose weight sounds really stupid, because it is really stupid.

The study also noted that the longer you fast (18-24 hours) the more less you weigh. Again, not really hard to understand. If you give your body a good amount of time to digest your food and burn stored food (body fat) then you will likely weight less. This jives perfectly with much of the data on intermittent fasting and restricted eating windows.

But there is more interesting data here. Eating breakfast is considered a very important part of weight loss. Are they correct? Indeed, yes.

If you eat breakfast, you are more likely to weigh less. At first glance, it seems hard to reconcile the data. You want to eat less, have a long nightly fasting period, but still eat breakfast? How does that work?

Well, the answer lies in the circadian rhythm, which I’ve written about previously. Recall that insulin, not total calories is the main driver of obesity, although there is an overlap, to be sure. Different foods elicit different insulin responses, and therefore have different propensities to cause obesity. That is, 100 calories of cookies are more fattening than 100 calories of broccoli, despite what all the mindless calorie zombies tell you.

The same food will also elicit different insulin responses at different times of the day. Eating the same food at dinner (compared to breakfast) gives you almost 30% more insulin effect. In other words, food is more fattening when you eat it later at night. But the bad news for late eaters does not stop there. If you look at the circadian rhythm for hunger, you’ll find that hunger is lowest in the morning and greatest in the evening 8:00 pm or so.

Another study (Bo, S et al) found the same phenomenon. In this crossover study, they took 20 healthy people, gave them the same meal but either in the morning or evening. So both arms had exactly the same people, eating the exact same meal, but only differing by time of day. The evening meal stimulated significantly higher blood glucose and blood insulin response and insulin is the main driver of obesity. Even more interesting, the evening meal produced a much lower resting energy expenditure afterwards compared to the morning meal.

So, if you eat your largest meal in the evening, you suffer from 3 problems. You’ll be more likely to eat more (because you are more hungry – yikes), you’ll get more fattening effect for the food that you do eat (higher insulin – double yikes), and you’ll have lower energy expenditure (more calories will get turned to fat). TRIPLE YIKES!

So, to be clear. If you eat one meal a day, best make it breakfast. If you eat two meals a day, best make it breakfast and lunch. BUT eating 3 meals (breakfast/lunch/dinner) is not necessarily better than 2 (lunch/ dinner), which is often the message given out by the ‘Never skip breakfast’ mafioso. The best solution is to eat a large breakfast/ lunch and eat very little or no dinner. This gives you the benefits of both fewer meals and longer night time fast.

So why do I skip breakfast myself?

Because that schedule of eating does not fit my lifestyle. I tend to eat dinner with my family every night, and we rarely eat breakfast together as a family, because we’re rushing to school and work. So I skip breakfast, because it fits my lifestyle, and eat dinner. This is not optimal, but it is what works for me. I still get the fewer meals, and the longer night time fast, but I get the disadvantage of high insulin effect at night. However, it is precisely this knowledge of science and practical experience that allows us at the Intensive Dietary Management program to devise individualized schedules for people. Trying to shoehorn an eating schedule into an incompatible life schedule is weight loss suicide.

The other recent study that was fascinating was the MATADOR study. In this randomized study, patients either received energy restriction either as a constant 8 week block, or in 2 week chunks alternating with 2 week blocks of no energy restriction (eventually totalling 8 weeks of energy restriction).

So both groups got identical calorie restriction and standardized diets, but one of them (Control) got 8 weeks straight of ‘dieting’ then 8 weeks of ‘no diet’. The other group (Intermittent) got 2 weeks of ‘dieting’ followed by 2 weeks of ‘non dieting’ for a total of 8 diet weeks.

Does the ‘intermittency’ of the diet make a difference? You bet the hell it did. Not only was far greater weight loss after 16 weeks, but at 6 months, the difference in weight was 8.1kg – 17.8 pounds! Jay-sus. There was weight regain in both groups at 1 year, but things looked a lot better in the intermittent diet.

What explains this huge difference? The answer is the change in resting energy expenditure (REE) also known as basal metabolic rate. The REE is how much energy is burnt by the body at rest (not at exercise). This is the energy (calories) used up in generating body heat, keeping the brain, lungs, liver, kidney, heart etc. working properly. This is not a static number but changes up to 30-40% depending upon the hormones. As you lose weight, the REE goes down (less body mass to heat, less energy needed) so you need to adjust the REE for Fat Free Mass (FFM) and Fat Mass (FM). Decreased REE is the main reason for the failure of The Biggest Loser contestants. 

Constant energy restriction steadily decreases REE. This is why the constant calorie restriction as the primary method of weight loss is a consistent loser. If you cut, say 500 calories from your diet every day, as many health authorities recommend, your body will simply adjust by burning less. This Caloric Restriction as Primary (CRaP) method is doomed to fail. As you eat less, you burn less. Eventually you plateau and then you start the weight regain. Tears follow the silent accusations of your doctor that you just didn’t have enough will power. But the fault was not your. It was physiology. It happens to everybody.

Instead, if you ‘diet’ intermittently, the body does not adjust and REE stays significantly higher. You have more energy, you don’t feel so cold, and weight stays off. It is the INTERMITTENCY of the diet that makes it successful. We talk constantly about the question of ‘What to Eat’ but almost never consider the equally important question of ‘When to Eat’. That is the reason, in my Intensive Dietary Management Program, we stress that you sometimes need to change things up.

One common question is whether eating one meal a day is acceptable. That is a daily 23 hour fast. Sounds pretty good. And it works well for a lot of people. But a lot of people will also plateau at a weight higher than they would like. At that point, we suggest that they do something to change the schedule. Sometimes we’ll suggest changing the diet, and other times we’ll suggest changing the fasting regimen. If you have plateaued, just do something different.

Lastly, I’d like to say a few derogatory words about the recent study about skipping breakfast and getting heart disease   – based on 4000 adults in Spain, breakfast skipping was associated with more heart disease. The media is having a field day proclaiming that skipping breakfast causes heart disease. Oh, My, God. You must always eat breakfast, even if it is a Krispy Kreme donut! Oh, My, God. I can’t believe you have been awake for almost 2 minutes and haven’t started cramming food into your mouth. Call 911! Oh, My, God. You need to sleep in the kitchen so you can shovel food into your mouth before your feet hit the floor. By the way – why can’t you lose weight?

Even the author is not so stupid as to suggest a causal relationship. He said ‘It’s not that you skip breakfast, you get plaques’. Of course not. People who skipped breakfast were also at higher risk of heart disease for other reasons, too. It’s kind of like saying that people with grey hair are at higher risk of dying (true – because they tend to be older). Therefore, to reduce the risk of dying, you simply need to dye your grey hair black. There’s a clear association with having an ‘A’ on top of your test and doing well in school. So, obviously, to do well in school, you should write ‘A’ on top of every test your write so you’ll do well. It’s absurd. But that doesn’t stop the media hype.

Understanding the science helps cut through the bull. There’s nothing wrong with eating breakfast. Eating more at breakfast and less at dinner makes physiologic sense for weight loss, because it reduces the insulin effect. But if you eat the same dinner but add breakfast, don’t expect that eating more food makes you lose weight.

2017-10-04T14:49:53+00:00 80 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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David
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David

The word you are looking for in paragraph five is “jibes” not “jives.”

Chewy
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Chewy

He meant “coincide” so jives is correct.

Jane
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Jane

“Jibes” is correct according to Merriam-Webster online dictionary, but since everyone says “jives,” that word usage is also fine.

Ronna Linn
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Ronna Linn

Thank you grammar police :/

John C
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John C

This post is well timed for me. I had recently shifted my eating pattern to mostly eating only one meal a day in the evening. This was easy on LCHF because I didn’t get hungry during the day, but my weight started to creep up, probably due to the effect explained in this post. I had already started adding lunch on some days and eating less in the evenings which halted the weight gain and I will now eat breakfast some days and skip or reduce dinner and/or lunch. I constantly vary the size and timings of my LCHF meals… Read more »

Roger Bird
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Roger Bird

In order to establish peace, we need to bomb relentlessly.

Kyle
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Kyle

This post is a bit confusing when compared to information given in THE OBESITY CODE where skipping breakfast seemed desirable for weight loss. ??

Darryl Braganza
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Darryl Braganza

My understanding from Day 1 of IDM, breakfast, if any delay until 10/11 am or if you must have breakfast early, then, “steak and eggs”!!! I have great success with early eating and late fasting…for dinner parties, it’s best being mindful…

Jeri Labell
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Jeri Labell

Amen to an insightful read, thank you Dr. Fung for intercepting my world. As for the nit picky spelling, LOL~ Did you mean to say JESUS, when you wrote Jay-sus? If so, HE is my LORD and Savior and HIS name is to be praised, not to be used as an exclamation, along with OMG. It is written, GOD holds no man guiltless who takes HIS name in vain. #3 Commandment.

Martin
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Martin

Yes, but we don’t all think like you, you see.

Ray G
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Ray G

perfect timing. my lose has plateaued with one meal a day in the evening and I questioned whether a morning meal would be better. I easily have 40lbs to my goal

Sarina
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Sarina

I love the way you write Dr Fung. This information is priceless.

Joanne
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Joanne

I don’t believe this agrees with what Dr. Bernstein teaches for diabetics. He recommends eating on a 6-12-12 plan (breakfast 5g carbs, lunch 12 and dinner 12) because diabetics don’t process carbs as well in the morning.

Sue
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Sue

He is a type 1 diabetic.

gpisabela
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gpisabela

Actually, it does agree. It’s about eating more of your proteins and fats at breakfast, which agrees with not eating a carb-heavy breakfast.

Northus
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Northus

“If you cut, say 500 calories from your diet every day, as many health authorities recommend, your body will simply adjust by burning less.” I get why that would be the case if you cut the calories but otherwise ate “normally” (eg high carb and many meals per day, ensuring high insulin), but is it really true if you combine it with IF? In the first case the high insulin will prevent weight loss and so the deficiency in calorie intake has to be compensated somehow, so the body burns less, which is bad. But in the second case you… Read more »

WorkInProgress
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WorkInProgress

After losing over 200 lbs and keeping it off for over 4 years, I can anecdotally add that mixing things up has been key, for me, for the ongoing maintenance.
In other posts, Dr. Fung discusses weight loss vs. nutrition; if you are concerned about weight loss, then focus on weight loss. If your concern is nutrition, then focus on nutrition. I now do both, but can increase/decrease calorie intake (wildly estimated, and only occasionally tracked) by 1,000 kcal per day (LCHF) with no perceived affect on REE or TEE.

John Brown
Guest

Love the post. However, this one has a lot more expletives compared to others. It undercuts the feel of authority that I’ve come to appreciate and is distracting. You can get the point across without using that. Please consider that one of the reasons why The Obesity Code is so compelling is the straight-forward approach. No chicken little alarmism. No fad diet hype.

Sue Ramdune
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Sue Ramdune

This is not a medical journal, but a blog. I find the overly serious sciencey stuff not fun at all – but when I read Dr Jason Fungs blogs, I enjoy them even more because of his expletives.. thus I’ve continued reading and learned a lot more!

Memaw
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Memaw

I agree. It demeans the information. There’s no need to use God’s name in vain. The point can be gotten across without it.

Schuller
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Schuller

If that’s the direction you wish to take the conversation, please learn what it means to take God’s name in vain…this post does not fit the accusation.

Trevor
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Trevor

Join the discussion
Which god are you referring to?…”YOUR GOD” There are plenty of gods

Cheryl
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Cheryl

I have a question for Dr. Fung. Intuitively, is the 2 week interval for intermittent dieting better than a 1 week interval and when you say dieting and not dieting, are you saying keto diet as dieting and non-keto as not dieting?

Sveinung
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Sveinung

Great stuff as always. I also tend to skip breakf(e)ast – just because it fits my schedule – and I like to cook dinner. But might use this as a tool in the future if I want to push through.

CSue
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CSue

There are a number of typos that could be cleaned up in this article that will give it more credibility. However, I am grateful to Dr Fung. I did 1-2 meals a day IF for several years and my metabolism definitely slowed. No matter how little I ate I couldn’t lose weight. After reading his book I started fasting, and then I lost the weight. Now I don’t have to constantly worry about every morsel I put in my mouth, I know if I can a few pounds on vacation or whatever, I can easily take it back off by… Read more »

Sonya
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Sonya

Would having your one meal at say 3:00 be of any benefit or is it too late in the day? I’d like to get in my exercise while fasting and then cook my meal (I only do one meal per day usually). Plus, the meal could probably be kept reasonably warm for the rest of my family when they got home.

Stephen T
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Stephen T

Sonya, I eat my second and final meal of the day at about 5.00 – 6.00 p.m. There are no hardset rules for me, except avoiding junk. So, if 3.00 p.m. works for you, then it’s fine and Dr Fung clearly eats later than that. We don’t need to be perfect to be good.

Sonya
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Sonya

Thank you Stephen! Love the phrase “we don’t need to be perfect to be good “👍

Carl Juneau, PhD
Guest

Great post! Loved the MATADOR study. Reminds of intermittent fasting. It’s like intermittent dieting. Love it.

Keep up the good work!

Christopher Simmons
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Christopher Simmons

I have been following the One-Meal-a-Day regime for several months now. I started with LCHF / Keto but I found all the heavy fat / coconut oil in coffee upset my stomach (usually have a ‘cast-iron’ stomach but keto made it really jittery). After reading Jason’s material I decided to try Intermittent Fasting. I went without breakfast (‘religious’ breakfast eater all my life), then missed lunch (not hungry) got hungry at dinnertime (probably because I cook most of our meals), then fasted overnight – it was so easy to just repeat this every day I just kept doing it. I… Read more »

Ashley
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Ashley

How does working night shift effect insulin levels? Would it be better to eat your one meal after work in the morning before going to bed or at night when you wake up for work?

Bruce
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Bruce

Ah well, sounds like Dr. Fung must be getting “accused” of being “religious” or maybe even, oh dear, “a Christian”!!!! Perish the thought! No great scientific mind was EVER a Christian, surely not! (uh hummm) Well, I will continue reading your stuff Dr. Fung, and praying for you. I will also humbly put forth that this is extremely common – unfortunately many great minds and wonderful thinkers and doers, great people, go this way – thinking they are above God, indeed, suppressing the knowledge of God. Face it, you, and all others, KNOW that there is God – the Bible… Read more »

Shari
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Shari

Way to bring me down, Bruce! I am not sure what triggered this condescending religious diatribe but this is not the place. This is a discussion about fasting, weight, health not your Sunday school class. And your passive aggressive “I will pray for you” stuff is just…you should be ashamed of yourself.

Alan S
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Alan S

Can someone please clarify if for example the following situation:
If I eat LCHF (and positively in ketosis) and eating OMAD should I eat all the daily calorific needs in that one meal (without restriction) to minimise the insulin response from my food?

If so, that’s a hell of a lot of calories to eat in one meal. I would have thought if I’m already in ketosis then any calorific restriction my body needs would be supplemented from my body fat?

Stephen T
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Stephen T

Alan, one meal might work for some people, but not for me. An insulin response is natural and not the enemy. The problem is the level of insulin generated by sugar and refined carb junk and the length of the insulin response caused by endless eating. I usually eat withing an eight-hour time window (11×7). I have no idea if I’m in ketosis, but I think I probably am at least some of the time. I’m not overweight and one of the benefits of LCHF for me is having control of my appetite, whilst still enjoying food. I don’t think… Read more »

Alan S
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Alan S

Thanks Stephen. I agree ive seen people eat LCHF with all kind of processed garbage. Im usually about 80% clean keto. Ive been IF fasting too but ultimately that means im always in a deficit so I was under the impression the extra calories my body needs would come from my body fat (but only if im in keto). I really only have 10Ilbs to lose now but its the last few pounds that are not shifting that easily. When I read this article that calorie deficit doesn’t help and the mention of hormones it always creates doubt in my… Read more »

Stephen T
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Stephen T

Alan, I wouldn’t eat more calories unless you feel hungry or lacking in some way. Yes, if your insulin has dropped, you can burn fat, but you also need the vitamins and nutrients that come from food. When I started LCHF I lost a few pounds and then seemed to hit my set point, or natural weight. My weight barely moves now unless I eat or drink differently. 10 Ilbs is very close, so I’d be cautious of major changes. If other contributors can’t help you and you still want more, perhaps a spell in the IDM or Diet Doctor… Read more »

Gus Karageorgos
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Gus Karageorgos

I’m not convinced that cycling is useful if one is on a ketogenic diet. Note, in that study carbohydrates as % of total calories was > 50%!

“The planned macronutrient distribution in both ER and energy balance diets was 25–30% of energy as fat, 15–20% as protein and
50–60% as carbohydrate.”

And it’s known that a low-calorie non-ketogenic diet will lower resting metabolic rate eventually (more than that predicted from the lowering of body weight alone). Thus, on a such a higher carb diet, cycling may be useful. But on a ketogenic diet, I think the jury is still out.

corrie
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corrie

I hope Dr Fung makes a reply to the points raised in your comment !

Tan
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Tan

I do too!

michael king
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michael king

Calories are not restricted if you are a walking run of lard as most are if you are in ketosis. Eating 70 percent of calories fat it is easy to go 20-40 hours between meals. And in ketosis the body just nibbled on the lard hanging off your internal organs anyway.

Tiffany
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Tiffany

I love this so much! As a lifelong “dieter” I cannot get enough of the science behind weight loss, and I really appreciate the way Dr. Fung presents the data. It is enlightening to finally understand why my former approach (CRaP) never produced lasting results and why I always ultimately, eventually, fell off the wagon. I have lost about 25 lbs doing keto but have only dabbled here and there with IF. This article and the pilot episode of The Obesity Code Podcast have convinced me to do some more n=1 experimentation on myself with IF and longer fasts.

Wow
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Wow

This man is a genius – I needed this information!

Bucio
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Bucio

Dr. Fung, If I recall correctly you had another post identifying that drinking a cocktail of apple cider vinegar with water 30 minutes before a big meal or any meal would cause a reduction of insulin being released up to 30%. Do you think that would help with the other two issues as well or just the reduction of insulin? The reason I ask is that I also am a dinner eater for the same reason as yourself. I have plateaued a 166-170 and was also curious that if doing the apple cider vinegar before my dinner would help me… Read more »

Sheila
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Sheila

Crazy! I keep a jug of it in my shower to rinse my hair but I’ve never been able to tolerate the taste enough to drink it! The other day I was rinsing my hair and some went in my mouth and I thought, “That’s not so bad? I should drink some! It’s supposed to be so good for you and help you lose weight!” I didn’t know about the insulin!

Stephen T
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Stephen T

Isn’t not eating breakfast the easiest way to add hours to the overnight fast? I try to give my body a reasonable break from eating every day, although that may be only 14 – 16 hours. A lot shorter than some, but way longer than most of the population. The important thing for me is that it’s sustainable.

Liana
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Liana

Yep, my ‘problem’ too. I’m never hungry in the morning. Never have been even when young and in school. I would get physically ill (puke) if I ate before several hours had elapsed from waking up. I work nights from 9 pm to 5 am and go to bed at 5:30 am and sleep until 1 pm. My first meal is at about 4 pm (small protein mainly), dinner with my husband is at 6 or 7 pm (regular full meal mainly protein, fat, and low carb) and a midnight snack of protein and a bit of fat while at… Read more »

Stephen T
Guest
Stephen T

Liana, I’ve worked night shifts and my approach was not to eat for a few hours before going to bed. I think your eating pattern makes complete sense.

Tan
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Tan

How is your weight loss/blood sugars numbers going (if that is a goal)?

Claire
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Claire

Another issue is that blood glucose can be artificially raised in the morning as a result of cortisol produced before getting up – dawn phenomenon. A small breakfast can lead to a shot of insulin which will deal with breakfast and that produced whilst sleeping.

Steve Stephenson
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Steve Stephenson

Any 7th day Adventist study is suspect per Dr Gary Fettke’s research: see https://youtu.be/DWCQF-FFJYk/ And collecting data via questionnaires is highly unreliable.

Walter S Bushell
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Walter S Bushell

Very interesting. I didn’t know quite the reach of that church.

Duncan Henry
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Duncan Henry

Hi Steve, as an SDA myself and a former database programmer for the AHS-2 study, I’d like to politely respond to your comment. Dr. Fettke did a commendable job summing up the history of Adventism and our dietary background and mission. His caution about the biases of study authors is prudent–anything arising out of an agenda warrants extra scrutiny. That being said, not everyone involved is Adventist, nor even vegetarian. Adventists have a particular interest in asking certain questions around nutrition; I contend that as long as the process of answering those questions is scientifically rigorous, then there is going… Read more »

Roger
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Roger

I always find your information logical, scientifically sound and easy to follow. Accordingly, I refer many of my patients to your information.

TeeDee
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TeeDee

I’m always interested in seeing new studies, but regardless of what they say, I’ve found what works best for me and it’s not eating breakfast. I feel like I’ve been pulled in every direction on things like meal timing, eggs being bad, then good, coffee being bad, then good, then bad again and on and on. I’m glad for it in a way because it forced me to do my own experiments with meal timing and food choices and now I can more clearly see what’s best for my health goals. I eat my main meal around noon and then… Read more »

Tamarah
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Tamarah

Same for me,, I cannot sleep on an empty stomach,, I toss and turn all night . I am OMAD and its at dinner,, I am watching my weight it fluctuates normally as usual,, if I see it going off the rails,, at that time I may have to reevaluate ,, but for now I am good .

Martin
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Martin

This touched home with me — I can’t not take the meds at this time as I have proteinuria — despite denial, my A1c was still at 7.1. If I don’t, I’m risking advancing kidney disease. I tried intermittent fasting. I tried just supplements, but I wasn’t giving myself a chance with dedication to either. With the proteinuria, ketongenic is probably not the best approach. (I love food, am a foodie, but not really a carb eater — but I like meats and…. booze) I would rather pack my eating late (and take med in the evening to push my… Read more »

Martin
Guest
Martin

I recently learned my A1c was still at 7.1. I haven’t been dedicated, but I tried intermittent fasting. I also learned I have proteinuria. I tried supplement only (Chromium, ALA, etc) Original testing said I was merely glucose intolerant. I can’t not take the med at this point for risk of further kidney damage. I prefer eating in the evening so skipping breakfast is not an issue, nor is skipping lunch. As far as insulin spikes in evening, I decided I will take my med in evening (Januvia) to help push my insulin inward instead of back to my liver… Read more »

Martin
Guest
Martin

Addn: doc says if I lost 50 pounds (specifically 50 pounds — I’m 5.11/ 221 — jeez, haven’t been 175 since 6th grade!) I could completely reverse the DM and go off meds. He wants me to do this by April 2018. Oh, God. Help!

Ron Hunter
Guest
Ron Hunter

We need more doctors who will say things like “no shit, Sherlock” and drop an occasional F-bomb. Someone needs to start talking the straight shit. Keep it up Dr. Fung.

corrie
Guest
corrie

I hope Dr Fung and/or his staff read the comments section here… I would like to alert them that the older blog posts that have been transferred over to this newer platform have not fully loaded. The blog posts regarding calories, aetiology of obesity etc. all have error messages where infographics should be. I often pass on the links to interested people, but now cannot. How can anyone read the posts and be convinced of the information if the supporting infographics are not there?

Lois Pearson
Guest
Lois Pearson

This is informative AND your writing is amusing.

Mark R
Guest
Mark R

Dear Dr. Fung, Please refrain from the “No sh**, Sherlock” and “Oh. My. God” rhetoric, and stick with the science!!! You lose credibility which we cannot afford to do in the uphill battle against conventional beliefs. When you write, “The advice to [eat constantly to lose weight] sounds really stupid, because it is really stupid,” others might easily insert [eat fat to lose fat]. Not a winsome debate!!! Your readers expect you to be more disciplined in your writings. Please!

Karen C
Guest
Karen C

I respectfully disagree Mark R. I appreciate the straight forward and sometimes colorful way of speak. Different folks.

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[…] blog post from Jason Fang about when how to eat – basically when to eat and when not to […]

Lisa Rogowski
Guest
Lisa Rogowski

Excellent article and I love the writing style. This came at the perfect time for me regarding breakfast or no breakfast. I am choosing a high fat breakfast and no dinner. That is what works for me. Thank you for this article!!

Jessica
Guest
Jessica

Thank you for being so informative AND funny. I mean, really, how many people read health articles and laugh???

Forest Simmons
Guest
Forest Simmons

Just because eating more in the morning and less at night tends to reduce body weight does not necessarily mean it is better. For our ancestors, more stored fat was a good thing, because (1) they needed that stored energy, and (2) it did not give rise to insulin resistance, since they were burning that stored fat. Similarly, I like to store my calories at night when it will be stored as fat so that I will have lots of fat to burn during the day. I would rather be a fat burner than a sugar burner because fat burns… Read more »

Forest Simmons
Guest
Forest Simmons

The early breakfast eaters weighed less for the same reason that people who cannot produce very much insulin lose weight unless they supplement with insulin. Their urine tastes and smells sweet because their kidneys are removing the blood sugar since it cannot be stored without the help of insulin.

So eat a big high carb breakfast and pee out the sugar instead of storing it as fat.

Professor Fung can tell us if this is good for the kidneys.

eddie
Guest
eddie

“…urine tastes…sweet…”?

Rafi G
Guest
Rafi G

Hi Dr. Fung, Very interesting blog post! I’ve been doing some research on the internet about insulin and blood sugar. I’ve noticed how people say something like a cup of soda (basically sugar water) can cause a rapid spike in blood sugar and insulin thus causing a rapid drop in blood sugar. Does this rapid drop apply to insulin too? How long does insulin highly elevated in the blood after eating a simple carb like bread, sugar, etc.? Does eating a complex carb like a sweet potato mean my insulin levels will stay high longer since the glucose is released… Read more »

Melinda
Guest
Melinda

Hello. I have recently started LCHF with intermittent fasting. I’m confused of one thing. Most interviews and posts I’ve seen from you seemed to indicate eating one evening meal was good for having sustaining the lower insulin. However this article stressed eating breakfast (or your earliest meal) is when you should eat the meal. It’s trying 18:6 ratio with one meal and maybe one snack. I am also currently trying one 48 hiour to mix it up and hopefully really lower my insulin levels. I am night shift which complicates things. So I think the evening meal works better for… Read more »

Marco
Guest
Marco

John Kiefer says we are more insulin-sensitive in the morning.
This is why he suggests to eat carbs at night.

Exactly the opposite of what you’re saying.

Tara
Guest

I’ve been studying up on Keto and IF for the better part of two years and this is the first time I recall hearing the position that eating the same meal later in the day produces a higher insulin response. Of course, it could be that it didn’t resonate with me at the time. So my question is, if it is related to the circadian rhythm, which I personally believe is different for many people, doesn’t it become more a matter of how long before bed one is eating most of their calories?

Lance Silverman
Guest
Lance Silverman

Excellent post except for the REE comments as it relates to Body Mass. REE Or BMR as it is more commonly known can be very low in large mass individuals. To speak colloquially as Fung, if this was not true then wouldn’t the tremendously fat lose weight lying still? They don’t, in fact many obese people gain despite caloric restrictions because their REE is so low. Why is it low? I don’t know, but have theories: 1. ThermoDynamic theory: More fat equals more insulation, less energy needed to create heat, lower REE 2. Hormonal: more fat more insulin, lower GH… Read more »

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katy
Guest
katy

I am relatively new to the IF, started investigating after reading an article in a woman’s magazine. I started 24 hour IF, EOD. now 36 hour IF every other day. Can anyone suggest an article or blog post that explains how it would be that if you eat less than your daily metabolic calories on “feasting” days (hmmm) that you would have glycogen in your liver that needs to be burned off in your fasting days. It seems to me that your body would use all the energy eaten, not store it. Also, I am hoping I’m one of the… Read more »

Franny
Guest
Franny

Has anyone experienced new allergies after intermittent fasting? I’m down18 lbs. but have a new allergy to eggs.

SSLW
Guest
SSLW

Dr Jason Hung , I positively love the information you are spreading. I’ve even started a water fast. On day 7 and feel quite good. Been struggling for years to lose this last 25 pounds and now 10 are already gone!
I would greatly appreciate if you could refrain from so much OMG it’s rather distasteful to a christian. I don’t want to send all my friends to read that. Thanks