The Trouble with Fructose – Video Log

The Trouble with Fructose – this week’s video log – available here

2019-03-31T13:25:49-04:0014 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Ol' WillJoan Willssusan j kellyPamAlex from Edmonton Recent comment authors
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Hans Markowski
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Hans Markowski

So? No fruits anymore? I never met a fat fruitarian…. I am confused, bread/past is “better” than fruits for pre diabetis people?

Elaine Griffith
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Elaine Griffith

What I took from his message is that too much fructose leads to fatty liver and obesity. So, we should stop using table sugar and cut our processed foods which have a lot of hidden sugars. Diabetics probably need to limit fruits also.

Alex from Edmonton
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Alex from Edmonton

Fiber slows the uptake of fructose so it doesn’t hit the liver all at once and it can be better managed. Check out “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” by Dr. Robert Lustig

Roger Bird
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Roger Bird

But what happens if one is eating zero carbs? That fat from fructose is burned just like any other fat.

Don Allphin
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I’m certain if in fact you are eating zero carbs the liver could easily handle a little fructose. It’s just that most of us (even on a very low-carb diet) are eating small amounts of sugar and you must realize that if you eat too much protein, it is also turned to sugar and then into fat, I believe again by the liver. See Dr. Fung’s Diabetes Code if you haven’t already read it.
A program of intermittent fasting just by the nature of fasting and feasting should allow for some fruit now and again.

Pam
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Pam

My understanding is that protein is turned into sugar in rare situations when your body requires it. It doesn’t make much sense for your body to turn protein (essential) into sugar (mostly non essential) just because you ate a lot of it.

Rhonda Netzhimer
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Rhonda Netzhimer

I thought that the natural fructose in fruit was metabolized along with it’s fiber! I’m confused! Should I, a Type 2, give up all fruit as well as all sugar? Heaven help me!

Dr. David J Matheson
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You can probably cure your type 2 D with nothing more than some intermittent fasting (Google this as connected to Dr. Fung) & giving up most of your sugar. Pasta, potaotes, rice & flour. Eat a few berries if you need fruit.

Stephanie
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Stephanie

I’d like more clarification on not eating fructose….are we to eliminate all fruits? Also what other foods have fructose?

Ol' Will
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Ol' Will

Staphanie,
Do a Google search for ‘fructose content of foods’.
Depending on your goals: If you are eating a diet that includes foods with no added sugars and you limit your fruit to a few pieces a day – especially if they are berries – you should be OK.

vasu
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vasu

isn’t fructose better than sucrose? liver has to convert fructose to glucose, so slow release

Ol' Will
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Ol' Will

vasu,
Didn’t you watch the video? Watch it again – 3 times.
Dr. Fung plainly says that fructose is turned into fat in the liver. It’s not converted to glucose like starch is. He said fructose only APPEARS to be better than glucose because it doesn’t cause a spike in the blood glucose reading.

susan j kelly
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susan j kelly

what happens with lactose, galactose, mannatose and all those other sugars? Do they go right to the liver also or are they metabolized into glucose?

Joan Wills
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Joan Wills

Thank you for this short video. A great way to share important information with those who are newbies. !!