How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

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How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides.

Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual.  Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way.

Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes.

A Fully Reversible Disease

Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people already instinctively recognized to be true.

Suppose your friend is diagnosed as diabetic, then works hard to lose 50 pounds. He takes himself off all his medications and his blood sugars are now normal. What would you say to him? Probably something like “Great job. You’re really taking care of yourself. Keep it up!” What you wouldn’t say is something like “You’re such a dirty, filthy liar. My doctor says this is a chronic and progressive disease so you must be lying to me” It seems perfectly obvious that diabetes reversed because your friend lost all that weight. And that’s the point. The disease is reversible.peter

We’ve  known all this along. But only diet and lifestyle changes will reverse it. NOT medications. The most important thing, of course, is to lose weight. But the diabetes medications don’t do this. Quite the contrary. Insulin, for example is notorious for causing weight gain. Patients intuitively sense that they are heading down the wrong path.

They would often say to me, “Doctor. You’ve always said that weight loss is the key to reversing diabetes. Yet you prescribed me a drug that made me gain 25 pounds. How is that good?” I never had a good answer, because none existed. It was not good. The key was weight loss, whereupon the diabetes often goes away or at least gets significantly better. So, logically, insulin does not help reverse the disease, but actually worsens it.

Other medications such as metformin or the DPP4 drug class are weight neutral. While this won’t make things worse, they won’t make things better either. Since weight loss is the key to reversing type 2 diabetes, medications won’t make things better. Medications make blood sugars better, but not the diabetes. We can pretend the disease is better, but that doesn’t make it true. That’s the reason most doctors think type 2 diabetes a chronic and progressive disease. We’ve been using the wrong treatment. We’ve been prescribing drugs for a dietary disease. No wonder it doesn’t work.

So, how can you reverse your diabetes?

The Sugar Bowl

The essential feature of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes is that our bodies are completely filled with sugar. It’s not just too much sugar in the blood. That’s only part of the problem. There’s too much sugar in our entire body. Imagine our bodies to be a sugar bowl. A bowl of sugar. When we are young, our sugar bowl is empty. Over decades, we eat too much of the wrong things – sugary cereals, desserts and white bread. The sugar bowl gradually fills up with sugar until completely full. The next time you eat, sugar comes into the body, but the bowl is full, so it spills out into the blood.

Insulin is a normal hormone produced when we eat and its job is to allow glucose into the cells. When it is no longer able to do it, glucose piles up outside the cell in the blood, and it is called insulin resistance.

But why does this happen? The cells are already over-filled with glucose (see previous post – A New Paradigm, and Insulin Resistance is Good?). Like trying to blow air into an over-inflated balloon, it simply takes more force. The cell resists the glucose because it’s completely full. insulin resistance is an overflow phenomenon.

It’s like packing your clothes into a suitcase. At first, the clothes go without any trouble. After a certain point, though, it is just impossible to jam in those last 2 T-shirts. You can’t close the suitcase. The luggage is now ‘resistant’ to the clothes. It’s waaayyy harder to put those last 2 T-shirts than the first 2. It’s the same overflow phenomenon. The cell is filled to bursting with glucose, so trying to force more in is difficult and requires much higher doses of insulin.

When the insulin levels are unable to keep up with the increasing resistance, blood sugars rise and your doctor diagnoses you with type 2 diabetes and starts you on a pill, such as metformin. But metformin does not get rid of the sugar. Instead, it simply takes the sugar from the blood and rams it back into the liver. The liver doesn’t want it either, so it ships it out to all the other organs – the kidneys, the nerves, the eyes, the heart. Much of this extra sugar will also just get turned into fat.

The problem, of course, has not been solved – the sugar bowl is still overflowing. You’ve only moved sugar from the blood (where you could see it) into the body (where you couldn’t see it). So, the very next time you eat, the exact same thing happens. Sugar comes in, spills out into the blood and you take metformin to cram the sugar back into the body. This works for a while, but eventually, the body fills up with sugar, too. Now, that same dose of metformin cannot force any more sugar into the body.

So you go to your doctor. What does he do? Instead of getting rid of the toxic sugar load, he doubles the dose of the medication. If the luggage doesn’t close, the solution is to empty it out, not use more force to . The higher dose of medication helps, for a time. Blood sugars go down as you force your body to gag down even more sugar. But eventually, this dose fails as well. So then your doctor gives you a second medication, then a third one and then eventually insulin injections.

Over a period of years, you went from pre-diabetes, to diabetes, to taking one medication, then two then three and then finally large doses of insulin. Here’s the thing. If you are taking more and more medications to keep your blood sugars at the same level, your diabetes is getting worse! Even if your blood sugars get better, your diabetes is getting worse. This is unfortunately what happens to virtually every patient. The body is already overflowing with sugar. The medications only hide the blood sugar by cramming it into the engorged body.The diabetes looks better, since you can only see the blood sugars. Doctors can congratulate themselves on a illusion of a job well done, even as the patient gets continually sicker. Patients require ever increasing doses of medications and yet still suffer with heart attacks, congestive heart failure, strokes, kidney failure, amputations and blindness. “Oh well” the doctor tells himself, “It’s a chronic, progressive disease”.

Imagine that you hide your kitchen garbage under the rug instead throwing it outside in the trash. You can’t see it, so you can pretend your house is clean. When there’s no more room underneath the rug, you throw the garbage into your bedroom, and bathroom, too. Anywhere where you don’t have to see it. Eventually, it begins to smell. Really, really bad. You needed to throw out the garbage, not hide it away. If we understand that too much sugar in the blood is toxic, why can’t we understand that too much sugar in the body is toxic too?

The End Game

What happens over time – 10, 20 years?

Every single part of the body just starts to rot. This is precisely why type 2 diabetes, unlike virtually any other disease, affects every part of our body. Every organ suffers the long term effects of the excessive sugar load. Your eyes rot – and you go blind. Your kidneys rot – and you need dialysis. You heart rots – and you get heart attacks and heart failure. Your brain rots – and you get Alzheimers disease. Your liver rots – and you get fatty liver disease. Your legs rot – and you get diabetic foot ulcers. Your nerves rot – and you get diabetic neuropathy. No part of your body is spared.

Medications and insulin do nothing to slow down the progression of this organ damage, because they do not eliminate the toxic sugar load from our body. We’ve known this inconvenient fact since 2008. No less than 7 multinational, multi-centre, randomized controlled trials of tight blood glucose control with medications (ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, ORIGIN, TECOS, ELIXA, SAVOR) failed to demonstrate reductions in heart disease, the major killer of diabetic patients. We pretended that using medications to lower blood sugar makes people healthier. But it’s only been a lie. You can’t use drugs to cure a dietary disease.

How to Reverse Diabetes

Once we understand type 2 diabetes, then the solution becomes pretty bloody obvious. If we have too much sugar in the body, then get rid of it. Don’t simply hide it away so we can’t see it. There are really only two ways to get rid of the excessive sugar in the body.

  1. Don’t put sugar in.
  2. Burn it off.

That’s it. That’s all we need to do. The best part? It’s all natural and completely free. No drugs. No surgery. No cost.

Step 1 – Don’t put sugar in

The first step is to eliminate all sugar and refined starches from your diet. Sugar has no nutritional value and can therefore be eliminated. Starches are simply long chains of sugars. Highly refined starches such as flour or white rice are quickly broken down by digestion into glucose. This is quickly absorbed into the blood and raises blood sugar. For example, eating white bread increases blood sugars very quickly. Doesn’t it seem self-evident that we should avoid foods that raise blood sugars because they will eventually be absorbed into the body? The optimum strategy is to eat little or no refined carbohydrates.

Too much dietary protein is also converted into glucose by the body. Therefore, you should avoid eating too much protein as this, too will only add sugar to the body. Protein shakes, protein bars, and protein powders should all be avoided. Instead focus on eating lots of vegetables and natural healthy fats.

Dietary fat, long shunned for its purported effect of causing heart disease, is back. Natural fats, such as found in avocado, nuts and olive oil are well known to have healthy effects on both heart disease and diabetes. The Mediterranean diet, high in natural fats, is well accepted to be a healthy diet. Dietary cholesterol has also been shown to have no harmful effect on the human body. Eggs and butter are back.

Most importantly, stick to eating whole, natural, unprocessed foods.

Step 2 – Burn it off

Fasting is the simplest and fastest method to force your body to burn sugar for energy. Glucose in the blood is the most easily accessible source of energy for the body. Fasting is merely the flip side of eating – if you are not eating you are fasting. When you eat, your body stores food energy. When you fast, your body burns food energy. If you simply lengthen out your periods of fasting, you can burn off the stored sugar.

Since type 2 diabetes is merely excessive glucose in the body, burning it off will reverse the disease. While it may sound severe, fasting has been practiced for at least 2000 years. It is the oldest dietary therapy known. Literally millions of people throughout human history have fasted without problems. If you are taking prescription medications, you should seek the advice of a physician. But the bottom line comes to this.

If you don’t eat, will your blood sugars come down? Of course.

If you don’t eat, will you lose weight? Of course.

So, what’s the problem? None that I can see.

We can reverse type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes today, right now, immediately. All without cost, without drugs, without surgery, with an all natural, time-tested healing method. We only need to lead our bodies down the healing pathway and have the courage to apply our hard-won knowledge.

 

 

 

2017-10-19T12:27:21+00:00 134 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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134 Comments on "How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide"

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Sue
Guest
Dr Fung, Thanks for the reminder about excessive protein! For all of you out there that haven’t tried this diet… I know it’s difficult to start but honestly we love eating this way. Yesterday we fasted until dinner (a 24 hour fast) and then for dinner we had pork chops stuffed with Gouda cheese, mushrooms and spinach, roasted cabbage covered in butter, coconut oil and Parmesan cheese and a salad with lots of good veggies covered in olive oil, vinegar and feta cheese. Before when we ate potatoes and rice and noodles we would leave the table feeling heavy and… Read more »
Domi
Guest

Hi Sue,
would like to know how your husband did it if possible.
I am newly T2 & working hard to reverse my condition. I am the usual Mets twice daily at 500 mg each pill.
I cut off 60% of most white flour & sugar drinks & eat 1/2 my plate with vegetables & run 40 km weekly.
Progress seems very slow after 7 months of trying.

Sue
Guest
Hi Domi! Let me try to walk you through what we do best I can. 1. Only eat low-carb vegetables, meat and fish. For right now, don’t have any fruit or anything white! (Rice, potatoes, pasta or bread…. no bread whatsoever.) 2. Add lots of good fat. Make sauces with whipping cream. Roast vegetables in olive oil. Add butter! Fat does not raise your insulin and that is what this whole process is about. Lowering insulin. 3. Fast. The first time we fasting it was a 24 hour fast. I thought I was gonna die waiting for dinner. But then… Read more »
Emile
Guest

Get off the Metformin and follow Dr. Jason Fung diet: FASTING ( no food ) READ UP AS MUCH AS YOU CAN ON THIS GUY; AS HE HAS THE ANSWER TO CURE TYPE 2 DIABETES. STAY AWAY FROM DOCTORS PUSHING MEDS ON YOU AS YOU ARE ONLY KILLING YOUR SHELF SLOWLY!!!!!!!!!!

Dr. Rob Oh
Guest

cut out all added sugar and refined carbohydrates. Use Fooducate app to help you barscan codes to determine how much sugar the food industry adds into your foods. That’s a great start!

robert lipp
Guest
Domi, Start with a strict diet, then when that has worked = normal weight, normal blood pressure, normal blood glucose etc. etc. then you can experiment with what can be relaxed. You may find that you cannot relax anything because all the good work starts to undo. Do your own LCHF research. No cereals in any form. No fruit in any form, no fast food, No margarine or other Trans Fats, NO ADDED SUGAR or HIDDEN SUGAR (read the labels), no below the ground veggies except garlic and onions, no peas or pulses. Be careful of soy products. Have above… Read more »
Singh
Guest

Domi, get the Dr. BERNSTEIN book it is amazing and apply fasting principles of Dr Fung and you will do amazing.

Marlene
Guest

I suggest cutting out white bread and sugar completely! ?

KidPsych
Guest

Agree completely with Marlene. I think once you’re at a maintenance stage, sneak in some refined carbs as treats, but if you’re serious about making changes right now, I’d cut out white bread and other refined starches completely.

Once I started to view donuts as cigarettes and white bread as a treat, life became a lot easier.

Geoffrey Levens
Guest

YES! Load up on above ground veg as your main volume of food and fill in with some good fats and a small amount of protein. And if you do some form of intermittent fasting things will go much faster; do whatever version appeals Fast 5 is what I do but Eat Stop Eat, Warrior Diet, etc, any way that will give your body significant breaks w/ lowest possible insulin production. That will give much faster reduction in insulin resistance which is the core problem. Soon you will be a lean mean fat burning machine!

Ian
Guest

How low in carbs do you go? Ketogenic low? How many grams of carbs would you say you normally eat. Also please tell me how often you fast? Intermittent Fasting like 16/8 or 20/4? Or do you just fast 24 hours once or week.?

Walt
Guest
Sue, a question I’ve asked that is yet to be answered, is how is a 24 fast possible if some time, presumably, greater than subsecond, spent each day eating. I, too, am on the ’24hr’ fast as described in Appendix A, but I (we) generally eat over the span of minimally 30min and if we have fruit for dessert that could span between 1 and 2 hrs. In other words, we don’t fast from 8pm to 8pm, rather 8pm to, say, 6pm the following day. I have been doing this everyday for the last month, as opposed to every other… Read more »
Geoffrey Levens
Guest

No need for 24 hours absolute. This is biochem. I do Fast 5 and have done for about 2 1/2 years. Many versions of intermittent fasting out there so just find one that works for you. F5 you eat during 5 hour window and fast the other 19 or so. Still gives plenty of time for body to clear all easy sources of glucose and drop your insulin production to its lowest possible which is what you are after.

Leaf Eating Carnivore
Guest
Leaf Eating Carnivore
Outside of the speed and ease of digestion, and therefore the height of your insulin spikes, it doesn’t matter where the digestible carbs come from. A glucose meter will help. Try: “The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Living”, Volek and Phinney. There is lots of good info out there, including Dr. Fungs blogs/book, Ketopia.com, Tuit Nutrition.com, etc, etc, and the very practical advice from VeryWell.com. The books that saved me initially were “Protein Power” and “Protein Power LifePlan.” And if you are really in deep Kimchee, Dr. Richard Bernstein’s book on Diabetes (although his main focus is Type 1,… Read more »
Sue
Guest
Hi Walt! We only eat meat, fish, and vegetables. Last night I made Havarti cheese stuffed hamburgers. I topped it with some cream cheese, tomato and lettuce. I roasted asparagus, mushrooms, broccoli, garlic and zucchini in balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Go online and look for lowcarbyum.com. She has great recipes! At first I thought this “diet” was going to be so limiting, but there are so many “hacks” for bread and desserts that it really never is boring. In terms of counting calories we don’t at all. We just eat the things we know we can eat and eat… Read more »
BobM
Guest
We eat similarly to Sue. I also vary my fasting, from multiple days to one or two to none. I generally don’t eat breakfast, but sometimes will. If I eat breakfast, I may not eat lunch. Or I’ll eat three meals. If we’re traveling to vacation, I’ll fast on the way. Once we get back, I’ll fast several days to get the carbs out of my system. I eat a LCHF diet, trying to eat as much fat as possible; now, I’m eating a ketogenic diet, though I did not always do so (and may not do so in the… Read more »
Debra
Guest
Sue, Thank you so much for taking the time to post and answer all the questions! Just noticing you say you only eat meat, fish and vegetables, but you also eat dairy. 1) Do you have any concern about how much protien you are eating? (do you measure/track?). 2) Is there any concern about dairy? do you eat any/all cheeses you want, plus cream and cream cheese? I guess I am asking, (for you) is it no big deal about any micronutrients since you are only eating once a day? My husband and I are only eating one meal a… Read more »
Sue
Guest
Hi Debra, It’s hard to know exactly what to do isn’t it! We sure haven’t gotten it down to a science plus we probably do have too much protein sometimes. Here is what I find. If we are good at eating less protein (like the size of your hand) and have more fat, blood sugar is better and we lose weight a little faster. Sometimes our weight doesn’t budge for a few weeks and then we lose some. Slow and steady wins the race. We eat all cheeses. (Just not processed ones like american cheese slices.) We have full fat… Read more »
Robert Victor
Guest

24-hour fasting means you eat once each 24 hours.

shermita
Guest
hi Sue i just started the IF and follow Dr. Jason Fung oh youtube. I have only been fasting for a couple of days now, like over the weekend i am into day 3 now. It has been very hard, but when I think about benefits of it, it is worth it. I am 43yrs and was diagnosed at 30yrs. I would like to reverse my diabetes. Can you tell me if it is common for your blood sugars to run high while doing IF? I have purchased the complete guide to fasting but it does not mention anything about… Read more »
Ainslee
Guest
Hi. I am an RN and recently had a diabetic patient I was admitting to our unit. He had a wound on his rt foot that was wrapped in kerlex. I unwrapped it so I could asses it and all his toes were black and half of the top portion of his foot was also black. What surprised me the most was he seemed to not realize he would need to have his foot amputated. When he ordered his dinner I felt completely sad seeing the ADA diabetic diet our hospital provides. More carbs then he should injest in 2… Read more »
Pete
Guest

Elegantly simple as usual Dr. Fung. Thank you for selflessly
sharing your thoughts. You have had a profound effect on my wellness.

Barbs
Guest
Another great post Dr Fung, you make so much sense to a layman like me. I don’t have T2 diabetes but my mother does and I can see it on my horizon as I am overweight and had a love of starchy refined carbs. I have started these protocols and already feel much better in myself. I went to a family party last weekend and did have some refined carbs, probably not as many as I would have done at one time but this time I was able to fast all the next day and just have one evening meal,… Read more »
Laura Joan Day
Guest

Thank you once again. I have gone from prediabetic blood glucose readings, to perfect readings, by following your advice–and lost 40 lbs as well. [less than 6 months, shorter fasts 20 to 24 hrs] at my age 69 it has been working for me. We may never meet in person, but hold you in the highest regard. You have saved me from years of suffering and unnecessary drugs I am sure.

Ernani
Guest

Hello Dr Fung. If you in fact reverse T2DM this way (or with bariatric surgery like on that case of the 2g of fat loss in pancreas), one can return to a SAD (standard American diet) and be as tolerant as a kid to its damage? Or one would redevelop the T2DM very quickly? Is there any “permanent pancreas damage”? Or that person never was tolerant to that amount of sugars to begin with?

Thanks, Your blog and your work is amazing.

Geoffrey Levens
Guest
The SAD is basically poison. People vary (based on genetics, stress levels, other variables) on how fast it will kill them but it is toxic to humans. No one can eat SAD with impunity even if damage does not show immediately. You need to learn to love vegetables! And eat only real food i.e. very minimally processed, as close to as “from nature” as possible, no junk, no chems, no concentrated extracts. If you stick to it 100% for a few months your taste buds and brain will change and you will come to much prefer eating a healthy diet… Read more »
Sue
Guest
Hi Ernani, Let me start with we will never go back to the SAD diet. But I too have wondered if this disease if fully reversed then it would seem that, for a while, you could go back to eating SAD, before you ended up with T2D again. I will say this. Twice my husband and I ate a couple of things that we never do. Once some potato salad and just last week a couple of ears of corn. We both tested our blood sugar to see if my husbands (who has T2D, I do not) blood sugar would… Read more »
Leaf Eating Carnivore
Guest
Leaf Eating Carnivore

As far as I can see, T2 mostly reflects a fundamental mismatch between an individual’s present physiology and her/his diet. So at the present time, the changes usually have to be seen as permanent, although individulized and evolving.

Ahmad Luqman Alias Firdaus Bin Ab Patah
Guest
Ahmad Luqman Alias Firdaus Bin Ab Patah

Hey….
How about the insulin resistance?
What happen?

ANA
Guest
Hello Dr Jason Fung, I’m from Brazil and a great admirer, I have read your blog entirely think fantastic. I follow a lot of his advice, I have 56 years old and had severe obesity, by first removed all sugar and flour, not consumption almost nothing industrialized, do 2-3 fasts of 24 hours per week. Over time I have seen my body turn, I lost weight 25kg, got a perfect health and an array of 20 years ago. I have read and heard many comments in the media about the use of Metformin for rejuvenation, I’d love to know your… Read more »
Jenny Froome
Guest

Thank you for the protein warning / reminder. I knew there was a catch and must educate my now healthy son to cut down on these so called healthy protein options. Good information. Simple and makes sense.

Jin
Guest

Nice results Sue, well done to you and your husband.

Sue
Guest

Thank you Jin. I have read many of your posts and gleened good information from them. It’s nice that we can share our stories here.

Deni
Guest
Dear Dr Fung. I have just finished listening to your podcast on Keyovangalist and reading this link. This is Fantastic information. I knew taking Insulin for my T2 diabetes was killing me! I was recently told I’m now functionally a T1. I recently had to have a Stent in my RCA as it was 80% blocked. I have just had a cataract removed from my left eye & in 3 weeks have cataract removed from my right eye. I have Diabetic retinopathy in both eyes requiring regular injections in both eyes so I don’t go blind. I have peripheral neuropathy… Read more »
Chris
Guest
Hi Deni, I’m obviously not Dr. Fung, but I have come to know a lot of people in the same situation as you. Going Keto was one of the best things they tell me they’ve ever done. A very low carbohydrate diet not only will help you not put in so much sugar in your body but if you choose to cut out added sugar and only get carbohydrates from green leafy vegetables, you will also rid yourself (fairly quickly, perhaps a matter of weeks) of that sugar addiction. Though my case was not as advanced as yours, switching to… Read more »
Samuel
Guest
Fortunately I have never been obese, nor do I have diabetes. There are cases on one side of my family, however. I came at this subject from the standpoint of sports performance, and affecting my lipid profile. I am 69 years old, and I ride a bicycle all day, say 50-60 miles and I never eat anything. I drink water if thirsty. I used to feed my face with starches and sugars, processed of course, from the “carb up” industry. Not any more. I have energy all day long, regardless of the difficulty of the ride. I don’t know what… Read more »
Deni
Guest

Wow Samuel thanks for your post. I am not anywhere within your realm of health or fitness. Just the opposite. But what you have posted has been very informative as I have been really seriously perusing the idea of starting a fitness campaign for myself which would include a daily bike ride.

Deni.

orit
Guest

quote: But metformin does not get rid of the sugar. Instead, it simply takes the sugar from the blood and rams it back into the liver

OMG…i was prescribed metformin today… since i am doing wonderfully fasting… maybe i shouldn’t take it?

but i thought metformin is good for improving insulin sensitivity. i am confused ?

Walt
Guest
While I suspect it is problematic to ignore a doctor’s treatment, you might want to pursue the issue with them, in light of information depicted by Drs Fung, Mosley, Taylor, Kraft. As Dr Taylor has said, these doctors are taught in medical school (to the extent they are per Dr Fung) with texts still ascribing long held medical dogma and due to that he crafted a Dr to Dr letter, explaining in doctor lingo what his research has found. He went on to say, it would take time for new texts to be cycled into medical schools. If you are… Read more »
orit
Guest

walt thanks… i couldn’t find dr Taylor’s letter. can you help me with a link. thanks again

Walt
Guest

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal.htm

and look down to “Information for your Doctor”

Ben Wagenmaker
Guest
Orit, When I was diagnosed with T2D back in late January, my doc also prescribed Metmormin. I chose not to take it, since I was told I needed to take it with food, and I wanted to fast. My plans to fast would have been hampered by having to take a medication that requires food. So I chose fasting instead. Five months later, here I am with normal blood sugar and 55 pounds lighter. I eventually told my doc that I chose to fast and go LCHF rather than medicate, and I told him why, and told him my results… Read more »
Sue
Guest
Hi Ben. Great post. My husband’s doctor told him to take 2000 mg of metformin a day, put him on a statin, a kidney medicine and low dose asprin. His A1C was 11.5 at the time. (YIKES) His fasting blood sugar was well over 300. His doctor told him that his goal was to have an A1C of 6 in 6 months but that he probably wasn’t going to be able to achieve that. He took all the meds for about 3 weeks until I found Dr. Fung. We were already NOT doing the recommended diet. We immediately went to… Read more »
orit
Guest
thank you so much for your example and warm words. when i talked to my husband about the doctor”s indications… my husband almost begged me not to listen to him and give fasting a chance. he reminded me that we are looking for a solution and although he understands that i am afraid… i need to give fasting a chance. i think he is right and you are right and i decided to wait with the metformin. i have been fasting for three weeks but i feel wonderful. less hungry. i am starting to lose weight. there is always time… Read more »
donny
Guest
I think you are right to be confused. Even at the beginning of this article, Dr Fung says; “Other medications such as metformin or the DPP4 drug class are weight neutral. While this won’t make things worse, they won’t make things better either. Since weight loss is the key to reversing type 2 diabetes, medications won’t make things better. Medications make blood sugars better, but not the diabetes.” Which makes it sound like metformin is insufficient to reverse diabetes it’s otherwise harmless. As in “won’t make things worse. But the later description of metformin; “But metformin does not get rid… Read more »
Peter Szombati
Guest

Great Post, as usual, thank you for putting my pictures as example, I feel honoured for it. I just hope that many people get to read this.
Greetings, Peter

Maura G
Guest
Dr Fung’s including the photo of a gangrenous foot as an example of the ‘end game’ of diabetes is extremely eye-opening. I have never read a description of diabetes as clear, nor as sobering, as this one. I understood that diabetes affects circulation, but I could not visualize the consequences until seeing that photo. The juxtaposition of that foot photo with the idea of a soda + fries, or a cake lathered in frosting, is more than my mind can manage without serious cognitive dissonance. I’m confident that recalling that image will make it far easier for me to pass… Read more »
Vi M
Guest

That was you in the before and after? Great job, Peter!
Do you have your success story posted somewhere? I’m wondering how long it took you to get to the after picture and how much IF you did?

Diana
Guest

Thank you Dr. Fung. So many people will be helped and so many more need to hear this!

James
Guest
Thank you Dr Fung, 49 years old, 4 weeks in, fast 24 hours every day so just eat an evening meal, which is Mediterranean style and tastes sooooo good after not eating all day and really easy to do. Dessert is a few squares of 90% chocolate and green tea, all done in less than 60 mins. Lost 10kg and cycle 40k 4 times a week easier than ever. My A1C was 6.0% which shook me up, so looking forward to next test in a few months. Thank you once again for not being a money grabbing drug pusher. May… Read more »
Walt
Guest
Good analogy Dr! I use another one, with regard to ‘reverse’ vs ‘cure’ vs ‘manage’. As I asked you once, the use of ‘reverse’ seems odd. One does not reverse a strep infection or a staph infection, or an STD. Nor do they manage it. I’ve had strep throat, likely several times in my life. If I saw a Dr that asked had I ever had that and concluded, it didn’t get cured, rather I’ve been successfully managing it for oh these many years, I’d laugh then leave. Even more pronounced for those that ever had an STD. Nope, still… Read more »
Walt
Guest

Perhaps not diabetic anew but prediabetic anew.

Walt
Guest

A point of clarification please. Cheese, specifically, either cheddar or swiss, as I understand American cheese is the worst, dietary speaking. It was my understanding cheese, as it is largely fat based actually had protective properties, like whole fat milk vs skim, full cheddar/swiss vs low fat frankencheese. Am I understanding the Fat Phobia chapter (and blog post) correctly?

I had assumed, given the low GL of Triscuits (actual true whole wheat grain) and a slice of cheddar was a low cost ‘healthy’ snack or ‘desert’ post dinner.

Walt
Guest

Similarly, half and half in morning coffee vs skim milk. I believe I am interpreting what you said and Dr Mosley said regarding cream/milk in morning coffee being acceptable.

Maureen
Guest

I have predawn phenomenon, I go to bed with healthy blood sugar but am higher then I should be after fasting. I am 10-15 pounds over weight. Usually only my morning reading is high. I have been told I am type II. Is there something else I should be looking at?

Lyn Thompson
Guest
HI Maureen, My response is very late to you but I notice that only some of the questions are answered or advice/help given. I have this same syndrome as many diabetics do, about 85%, so I find it hard that no one has talked about this or tried to address it. Here is what I know; during the night when we do not eat our liver dumps out glucose into the blood. The reason is not fully understood but many theories point to us not eating and the liver is delivering glucose to the cells for the mornings bout of… Read more »
AJ
Guest

Assuming you are not diabetic, do you have to be on a low carb diet for fasting to be effective in weight loss?

Or during feeding days can you still eat occasional rice / pasta?

Walt
Guest
If I could, at least in part, answer your question. From Dr Fung’s book and 6 part You Tube series, and blogs, there are two components required for insulin resistance, the precursor to (pre)diabetes, 1) high insulin levels and 2) persistent insulin secretions. Processed wheat, white bread, pasta, rice, especially minute rice, are the worst, short of pure sucrose, in rising insulin secretions. A fast breaks that persistent component of persistent and high insulin secretions/levels. However, the one-two punch is fasting, which addresses the persistent level, to a degree, and no white food (sugar, flour, bread, rice, pasta, potatoes). Where… Read more »
AJ
Guest

Many thanks for taking the time to reply Walt.

RF121
Guest

Fasting is easier when you are fat adapted. If you are on a SAD diet after four hours of eating you will get hungry making a 24 hour fast difficult. Not just the mental battle but your body begging for glucose. That is why being low carb, actually very low carb is best as your fat stores can be accessed keeping the hunger away.

Joanna
Guest

Dr. Fung,
What do you think about Victoza for weight loss and sugar control?

SDP
Guest
I am a little disappointed in this post. I am one of the so-called “evil” dietitians you reference, who see people with Type 2 diabetes every day. I coach and implore them to change their diet and exercise. We show them all the benefits of adopting vegan/vegetarian lifestyles or at least more plant based foods. I wholeheartedly agree that the majority of patients with Type 2 DM can at least delay abnormal lab values. I take issue with some of your wording though: 1. Lifestyle change does not reverse diabetes- as I tell patients, you always have the “potential” to… Read more »
Mr luqman
Guest

How to measure insulin deficient?

Walt
Guest
No, lifestyle changes do not reverse diabetes. Becoming insulin sensitive again does. This is not new. I encourage you to research Dr Joseph Kraft, Dr Roy Taylor (New Castle Magnetic Resonance and New Castle University) and Dr Michael Mosley. Dr Taylor at New Castle has conducted several, of various sizes clinical trials that prove T2D is, in most cases, reversible. If you aren’t on medication and an A1C is in the low 5’s, consistently, what would you call it, reversed, cured, in remission? It’s as I said above, in remission implies the original cancer is still there simply not spreading.… Read more »
Walt
Guest
Isn’t lack of insulin Type 1 diabetes? My understanding, from researching the above 4 Drs is T2D is too much insulin causing insulin sensitivity which, can itself, cause persistent and high insulin levels w/o the presence of fattening carbs. In fact Dr Kraft’s research over 30 years on subject indicate by the time the diagnosis is made via elevated blood sugars, the patient had been ‘diabetic’ for a very long time, decades perhaps, and the only sane test for diabetes is the glucose tolerance test of only if the pattern matches the type 1 (he defined four gtt patterns) was… Read more »
Daryl
Guest
To the “evil” dietitian (SDP) I would like to tell you that I don’t regard you as “evil” in any moral sense, but like you said, I too am a little disappointed with your post, and with most “dietitians” who present the objections you do. When I was diagnosed as a type 2 diabetic, I was very, very afraid. My endocrinologist referred me, as per his usual practice, to a PhD. nutritionist, who asked regarding my food choices. When I told her about my love for healthy granola, she said you don’t have to quit morning cereal, just make healthier… Read more »
David
Guest

There’s little scientific merit to this vegan/vegetarian stuff you’re pushing, it’s more of a religion. There are ethical and environmental arguments against meat consumption, but to present veganism as the solution to diabetes is not scientifically warranted.

Gary
Guest

I agree with you here. Coming from this so called vegetarian society , I know that it is not the bloody solution. Eventually I have become meat eater, pure protein means less carbs and help controlling the sugar level. This all vegetarian food this and that is total nonsense and in fact it has bad effect on health, especially those beg curries.

Gary
Guest

I mean veg curries

Myrto Ashe
Guest
SPD, thanks for reading and questioning. This is how we all move forward. I am an MD, and did not know how to roll back diabetes until I began to study functional medicine (a systems-based approach to chronic illness). Now I measure my patients’ insulin and glucose both, and I agree that many people (some prediabetics too) have a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. For example, the fasting insulin is 12 (ideal would be under 7) and the fasting glucose is 112. So why does the pancreas not do more to get the blood sugar to normalize??… Read more »
Emile
Guest

Joanna; do you want the side effects that come with taking Victoza. For the weight you lose; the side effects are far worse

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Paula
Guest

Any advice for someone with T2 and gout? My husband is attempting fasting and LCHF but has gout flare-ups. His Indomethacin intake is beginning to worry me. And, we are currently living overseas in an area where medical care is strictly conventional.

Thanks!

Robin
Guest
I love this website and have been practicing IF for the past few months. I don’t have T2D but have gained some weight over the past year. The weight is coming off slow and steady. Fasting is much easier than I thought it would be. My FB friends now think of me as “that crazy fasting woman”. 😉 But just to play devil’s advocate, I could see someone asking if the weight loss achieved during the fast wouldn’t be offset by fat storage afterwards. In other words, if the body gets more used to burning its fat, would it also… Read more »
Walt
Guest
Robin, look into Precision Nutrition and their blogs. They make the case determining the caloric content of food I’d imprecise, the thermic expenditure of food varies, one metabolism varies due to adaptation it is difficult to pin down exact protocols. Much of the a that was my wording. So can they broke it into simply!e terms like one fist-full of the per meal and two fist-fulls of that per meal. How does one model ‘fist-fulls’? And is that a woman’s fist or a man’s fist. But, to your point, I totally agree. I did, however, happen across a ketone diet… Read more »
Wendy
Guest

Anyone know how to break a long fast, such as 30 days for example, without complication? I’ve read that it should be with fruit or juice. That doesn’t really make sense to me though because wouldn’t that spike insulin like crazy? I am actually very concerned because I don’t want to get sick or die or end up in the hospital. Anyone know what to do? Dr Fung?

Sue
Guest
Hi Wendy, You kind of sound like me. All or nothing. 🙂 Have you ever fasted before? Are you following a LCHF diet? Why do you want to fast for such a long time? So here is my uneducated advise. Do some small fasts first. 24, 36, 3 days. Follow the diet. The couple of longer fasts (5 days) that Tony and I did we ended the fast with a little bit of cream of broccoli or asparagus soup. Maybe a cup. We waited a couple of hours and had a small meal. Maybe a pork chop and a small… Read more »
BobM
Guest
I’ve fasted 4.5, 5, and 5.5 day fasts and many 3.5 day fasts (e.g., stop eating Sunday night and don’t eat again until Thursday at lunch). Every time, I ate something to end the fast. i typically eat a full meal. I never get “sick”, but I do go to the bathroom many times the following say 8 hours or so. And it’s all water. After that, I’m OK. My wife has less problems with this, but eats the same as I do. Personally, I would find it difficult for these “shorter” fasts to not eat at the end. Once… Read more »
RF121
Guest
Wendy, you need to read up on breaking a fast of that duration as complications can develop. Your digestive system has totally shut down by then so dumping in a bunch of food is not good. You always read that you should be medically supervised on a fast that long but try finding a doctor that has a clue about fasting. You could watch some You Tube videos by Dr Alan Goldhamer of TrueNorth Health Center which is a fasting clinic in northern CA. Fasting cures were popular in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s but never became main stream.… Read more »
Marlene Zwiebel
Guest

This was very good to hear how other people are trying to improve their lives with this new method of fasting. It was great to hear how success it has been for many. I working my way through Dr. Fung’s book. It great to know it will make such a difference in my life.

Marlene Zwiebel
Guest

I am learning a great deal by taking my time to read the book and let it soak in.

Marlene Zwiebel
Guest

I am working at changing my soft drinks and not eating cereal or white flour and sugar.

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[…] How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes:  https://intensivedietarymanagement.com/reverse-type-2-diabetes-the-quick-start-guide/ […]

Tamara
Guest

During the fasting period can you have water and/ or bone broth?

Sue
Guest

Lots of water! And yes some bone broth… makes fasting very doable!

charles grashow
Guest

Dr Fung

What about studies showing reversal of T2D with a high carb low fat macrobiotic diet?

joe
Guest

Plase provide a link to those studies.

BobM
Guest

He’s a resident troll. Sort of like “carbsane”.

Etienne Juneau, PhD
Guest

One of your best pieces so far. I read your blog regularly. And your newsletter. Keep up the good work.

Cheers,

Etienne Juneau, PhD
Doctor of Public Health

Gary
Guest

My problem is beer. I genuinely love beer. I can do fasting on lime water but its beer that is casing me a problem. How do I manage it?

Sue
Guest

Gary! Haha…. mine is wine. My husband drinks Mich Ultra…. 2.3 carbs. It’s hard to give up so much about what we love! But I do believe in short term sacrifice, long term goals…. Here’s to good health~Cheers!

Gary
Guest

Sue, exactly and I very well understand what you mean. I am still in early 40’s and just now got detected for T2D so all of a sudden doing all these changes to lifestyle is kinda getting overwhelming. Moreover here in Canada we hardly have Summer so much harder to stay away from beer and BBQ. But as you said perfectly “Short term sacrifice, long term goals for good health”
Cheers

Sam
Guest
“If you don’t eat, will your blood sugars come down? Of course. If you don’t eat, will you lose weight? Of course. So, what’s the problem? None that I can see.” Hmmm. I’m pre diabetic, but NOT overweight. In fact, i need to increase my weight (in terms of muscle mass)! So my problem is that if i don’t eat, i will lose weight which is precisely what i don’t need or want to do. Also i need to eat plenty of protein to both maintain and increase my muscle. I would be interested in knowing what Dr Fung would… Read more »
Boris
Guest

Thru the years I went from trim to obese and developed d2.

With Dr. Fung’s fasting protocol I got rid of my d2, now have healthy blood markers, got skinnier, reached my 8th grade weight and I’m loving it.

I’d rather be skinny and healthy than d2 and sick, which is deadly. It’s your call.

Moni
Guest
Sam: You don’t mention your age, but weight per se is meaningless. I haven’t had a scale because of that most of my life. The important thing is the proportion of muscle and bone versus the percentage of fat within the body. I am only about 6 kilos overweight and it doesn’t show a lot. However, as we age, even if someone weights what they should, fat tends to deposit towards the inside of our body, towards the organs. You may see nothing but it could be there. If you want to increase muscle mass the path is exercise. I… Read more »
ANA
Guest
Hello Dr Jason Fung, I’m from Brazil and a great admirer, I have read your blog entirely think fantastic. I follow a lot of his advice, I have 56 years old and had severe obesity, by first removed all sugar and flour, not consumption almost nothing industrialized, do 2-3 fasts of 24 hours per week. Over time I have seen my body turn, I lost weight 25kg, got a perfect health and an array of 20 years ago. I have read and heard many comments in the media about the use of Metformin for rejuvenation, I’d love to know your… Read more »
cobina
Guest

Dear Dr Fung, I am biochemist and I have been following your post and videos on the subject. There are people who loose weight unintentional as type 2 diabetics. recently I read somewhere that if you are able to loose 0 .6g of fat from the pancreas it will start to reproduce insulin. my question is, why is it that people who loose weight unintentionally not reverse their diabetes automatically.

Thanks for your insights

Vi M
Guest
Great article – it really gives me a simple way to look at getting rid of sugar. I am forwarding it to people I think will be helped, and I actually linked to this particular article in a book review of The Obesity Code I just posted on my book review blog (I link the review below). The picture of the blackened toe – I wish I could un-see that. I’ve been steadily losing weight after reading articles here that demystified IF. I skip breakfast, drink coffee with butter instead. I don’t have T2 but it runs in our family… Read more »
Robbo
Guest
I have been struggling to manage T2 Diabetes having been diagnosed several years ago at a young age. I find the vast amount of information and advice provided from Dieticians, Doctors and the web extremely confusing. My father whom is T2 has practiced various forms of fasting which for over 18 months had a positive effect on weight loss, insulin levels and blood sugar levels. However he recently experienced elevated levels of Cholesterol which was impacting and elevating his blood sugar levels. Dieticians and medical staff put down to his liver creating cholesterol and said it was reacting to the… Read more »
ronny
Guest

I’m old, and I work out intensively. I have a congenital back misalignment condition that depends on strong body and back muscles for me to function. I don’t have Diabetes 2.

Will fasting be safe for me? I don’t want to deplete muscle.

Richard S Stone
Guest
Ronny: I’m 71, and I’m not sure if that qualifies me as old or not, but I think you should read more of Dr. Fung’s posts and listen to/watch more of his lectures. The idea is that fasting does a number of things, only one of which is to minimize (stop?) insulin production. There are other hormonal and different changes caused by fasting, also known as “not eating.” As Dr. Fung points out many of these changes relate to the body trying to deal with nutrient deprivation and the meaning of that deprivation. Thus, as he points out, if fasting… Read more »
Larry
Guest

What do you do if (1) you already lost 40 pounds, (2) eat a low-carb diet, (3) run 60-70 miles a week, and (4) still have an A1C in the low-mid 6s and fasting sugars up to 130 and never below 100?

kc
Guest

i was wondering the same thing….fasting morning numbers are always the highest for me due to the so called dawn phenomenon. i checked my glucose level for 2 days at 2:30 in the a.m. and they were 101 and 103, normal at that time. when i got up 3 hours later they were higher. by the way i am not overweight.

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[…] That doesn’t mean eat anything you want. He clearly says (How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide): […]

Erik
Guest

Dr Fung – the enemy of Big Pharma, Big Drug Store, Big Food, Big Endocrinology, and the ADA. A menace to society!

SUSHRUT CHAUDHARY
Guest

i am a diabetic since last 20 years ,started eating one meal a day at 8pm everyday,i have discountinued my diabetic pills my ketones in urine are high i lost 13 pounds in 20 days my post meal sugars are 125 with LCHF AND FASTING SUGARS ARE 120

I AM CONCERED HOW MANY CAN I GO ON WITH ONE DAY MEAL ?

Kok-Hong Wong
Guest

Dr Fung,

I look forward to you publishing statistics of T2D patients that your practice has helped to achieve HbA1c < 6% 😀

Raj
Guest

Hi, what about people who are not overweight?

My mom has been taking insulin for over a year now, and the dosage has increased over the past year. I’d like her to give fasting a try and see how it affects her sugar levels.

How do you recommend fasting for people who are not overweight or almost in the category of being underweight? How do we manage energy levels for such people?

Any advice ?

kazi md. akbar hossain
Guest
kazi md. akbar hossain

i love it and i read almost all of your article and i listen most of you lecture and I love it if I get what should I eat and how I start my fasting then I am highly satisfied on you . So please give me the guide line where I get it thank you

Jane
Guest

How much carbs can I eat a day? Can I drink carrot juice? or carrot apple juice? or eating raw carrots? how much carrots can I eat? Thank you!

vishnu budhu
Guest

Hi Dr Fung can i drink water during fasting

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