My Journey

The Long Road

I am sometimes asked about my journey and how I became so interested (obsessed?) about nutrition and dietary treatments. It’s kind of a funny thing. I barely had more than a passing interest in nutrition until the mid 2000s. At the time, the Atkins diet was in full swing. It was everywhere. Some family members had tried it and were ecstatic. However, like most conventionally trained physicians, I believed their arteries would eventually pay the price.

The Long Road

So my interest in nutrition began to grow around the mid 2000s when several interesting publications started to appear in the most prestigious medical journal in the world – the New England Journal of Medicine. These papers were randomized controlled trials of the Atkins styled diet versus the standard low-fat diet that I, along with thousands of other physicians, believed to be the ‘best’.

These studies all had the same conclusion. The Low Carb diet was significantly better at weight loss than the Low Fat diet. Even more stunning was that all the important parameters (cholesterol, blood sugars, blood pressure etc.) for heart disease were also much improved on the Low Carb diet. This was a puzzle, a real conundrum. This is how my journey began.

Background

I grew up in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I went to the University of Toronto at age 17 to begin studies in Biochemistry. By 23, I completed medical school at the U of T, and began my Internal Medicine residency there.

Finishing my specialty of Internal Medicine, I chose Nephrology (kidney disease) as my sub-specialty. Each field of internal medicine draws its own personalities. Nephrologists had the reputation of being a ‘thinkers’ specialty. There are a lot of intricacies of fluid and electrolytes, and I enjoyed these puzzles. I studied Nephrology at the University of California, Los Angeles mostly at Cedars-Sinai Hospital and the VA Wadsworth. Looking back, I realize that it must have been a little disconcerting to patients in the hospital to be treated by a doctor who looked about 18 years old.

2003

I returned to Toronto in 2001 to start my career in Nephrology, where I still have both an office and hospital practice. Type 2 diabetes is by far and away the leading cause of kidney disease, and I treat many hundreds of patients with this disease. Many also have obesity. By the early 2010s my interest in nutrition, combined with my professional focus on obesity and T2D had led me directly to the diabesity puzzle.

Obesity

The studies in the literature proved that the Low Carb approach was a viable one. But this didn’t make any sense to me since I was still steeped in the Calories In, Calories Out (CICO) approach of conventional medicine. But yet, many studies confirmed the superiority of the Low Carb diet. Something was wrong.

One possibility is that the studies were wrong. This is unlikely, given that many studies all showed the same result. Furthermore, it confirmed the clinical experience of thousands of patients, who were all reporting weight loss on the Atkins diet.

So, logically, if the studies were correct, then the CICO approach had to be wrong. Much as I tried to deny it, there was no saving the CICO hypothesis. It was dead wrong. I could now see things from an entirely different vantage point. If the CICO hypothesis was wrong, then what was right? This led me a book that turned the lightbulb in my head to ‘on’. That was Gary Taubes’ 2007 best selling book ‘Good Calories, Bad Calories’. It was revolutionary. There’s no other way to describe it.gcbc

Dr. Atkin’s books were never much about science. They were written for easy consumption and did not go much into the science of obesity and weight gain. I hate most diet books. Most simply say ‘This is my diet and it works’. There is no explanation of why it works. There is no consideration for the scientific studies. Superficial. Purely superficial, mostly taking the ‘Eat this, not that’ approach. Then, because they need to fill the book, half of it is usually a cookbook.

Good Calories, Bad Calories was a completely different beast. First, thank God, there was no cookbook attached to it. Instead, it was page after page of extensively researched material. But clearly, a lot of time was devoted to putting all this research together into a tightly cohesive thesis. Finally, here was a start to puzzling out the underlying cause of obesity. Here, at long last, was some serious attempt to understand the aetiology of obesity.

Aetiology is a medical term that means ‘the underlying cause’. What is the underlying cause of obesity? We spend almost no time thinking about this problem. Why? Because we think we already know the answer. We think the answer is that Excessive Calories causes obesity. Therefore, if too many calories is the problem, then the answer is Caloric Reduction. But there’s an obvious problem. Caloric Reduction has been done to death. And it doesn’t work. No matter why it didn’t work, the bottom line is that we’ve all done it, and it doesn’t work.

The underlying cause of obesity turns out to be a hormonal, not a caloric imbalance. The hormone at the center of the debate was insulin. If excessive insulin was causing obesity, then clearly the answer lay in reducing insulin.

Type 2 Diabetes

But here was yet another inconsistency. If reducing insulin was effective in reducing obesity, why were doctors like me prescribing insulin as a cure-all treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Insulin is, in fact, quite an effective way to lower blood sugars, which we all thought was beneficial. In fact, several large scale trials from 2008 had already proven that reducing blood sugars in T2D was virtually useless. But why?

In considering this problem, it took me quite some time, but I finally realized that the answer was really quite simple. We were treating the wrong thing. T2D is a disease of too much insulin resistance (IR), which causes high blood glucose (BG). Yet we were not treating the disease (high IR), but instead, treating the symptom (high BG). That’s why the treatment was useless. The underlying IR was being untreated. So the T2D was getting worse.

But what caused the high IR in the first place? This was the real question. What is the aetiology? After all, we didn’t stand a chance of treating the underlying disease if we didn’t know what caused it. I still remember lying in bed one day when I realized what the answer was. Insulin caused insulin resistance. If that was true, then insulin causes obesity and insulin causes T2D. The cure for both was clear – reduce insulin!

Instead, we were prescribing insulin to patients. Instinctively, most patients knew what we were doing was wrong. They would say to me “Doctor, you have always told me that weight loss was critical in the treatment of T2D, yet you have prescribed me insulin which has made me gain weight. How is that good?” I never had a good answer for this. Now I knew why. It was not good.

Patients knew, though. They would take insulin, and gain weight. As they did, their T2D got worse and they needed more insulin. As they did, they gained more weight. As they gained more weight, they needed more insulin. It was a vicious cycle. And the patients were on the wrong end of it.

Then came the inescapable, horrifying conclusion. We, as doctors, had been treating T2D exactly wrong. And that is why I have started this journey. Because with the proper treatment, T2D is a curable disease. T2D is a disease of too much insulin, just as obesity results from too much insulin. The treatment is to lower insulin, not raise it. We weren’t just not treating T2D, we were making it worse.

So far, I have been discussing the aetiology of obesity in these posts. Now, we will start to tackle the disaster of the type 2 diabetes epidemic and how to reverse it. This should get me into even more trouble….

See the lecture “The Two Big Lies of Type 2 Diabetes

2017-10-19T13:51:20-04:0057 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Sandy
Guest

Thanks for sharing a part of your life with us…. I enjoy all of your articles.. I am applying all I have learned from you and spreading your word… Thanks again.

BobM
Guest
BobM

I have to give you credit. You were able to change your mind even in the face of everyone else’s believing something different. That’s incredibly difficult to do. I also credit you with starting my own journey in reversing my insulin resistance, mainly through intermittent fasting (in combination with a low carb, high fat diet). I was looking for a way to reduce insulin resistance, and that’s when I stumbled upon your website. While there are other IF websites out there, you have a comprehensive approach and a tremendous amount of great information. Your theories also fill holes in my… Read more »

Mike S
Guest
Mike S

Thank you Dr. Fung for sharing your story, it’s nice to know something about the person behind all that goes on here. I discovered your website about a year ago after a three year project to lose weight, and I have read every post and watched every video. At the time I was eating LCHF and thinking about intermittent fasting, and based on some information found on your site was encouraged to make a few changes in my plan which resulted in me restarting weight loss and reaching my goal. Not only that, I have found a new lifestyle. Thanks.

Dr. Sergio Castorena
Guest

Dr. Fung, It’s such an inspiring story you’re sharing with us today. Everytime I read you, since I got to know your blog, I feel more and more excited and encouraged to learn everything you know about T2D and the IDM, which makes me wonder if there’s a chance to visit at your clinic in Canada sometime, in order to be one of the few doctors who treat diabetes the right, but denied way. Thank you very much Dr. Fung for your vast information. And since you said that “this should get you into trouble”, as you stated once: Treating… Read more »

DebbieC.
Guest
DebbieC.

Great story, I need to copy and paste much of what you say about insulin and blood sugar. My own blood sugar has been creeping up in the last couple years and when I had blood testing done by my new doctor my fasting FBG 260. They called and left a message on my phone that they wanted me to come in immediately! However I was out of the country (up in Canada in fact) for 6 weeks so could hardly come in, and my fear was that they wanted to do something like insist I needed to start taking… Read more »

Michael
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Michael

Very good article Dr. Fung. I started following you sometime ago regarding obesity and diabetes. 12 weeks ago, I started a ketogenic diet because I was just getting fed up with the doctors and INSULIN!!! Prior to my changing my diet, my sugars with insulin eating an ADA Diet would run from 55 to over 300 with a 60 day average from 155 to 170 while I was injecting insulin up to 6 times a day (novolog) and 1 times per day (Lantus) and had even been on as much as 2000 mg of metformin a day (Got taken off… Read more »

Cheema
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Cheema

Michael, It is heartening to know that you are off your heavy doeses of insulin. I am in the same situation and sfter reading the articles of Dr Fung, I intead adapting LCHF diet lifestyle. Michael I will be really great full to talk to you, if you you leave your contact number or skype lD etc. I need to get guigdace about your meal plans. Thanks in advance to you and hats off to Dr Fung’s free services for humanity to reduce the sufferings of so many people.

matt20
Guest
matt20

I had my DNA analyzed and have a variant in the FTO gene (C;T 1.67 risk): 60% of the population, on average, have a genotype (C;T or TT) predisposing to obesity: Geno Summary (C;C) average (C;T) 1.67x risk for obesity (T;T) 2.76x risk for obesity Link: http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1121980 Here is a recent finding from MIT and published in NEJM: “Now experiments reveal that a faulty version of the gene causes energy from food to be stored as fat rather than burned. Genetic tinkering in mice and on human cells in the lab suggests this can be reversed, giving hope that a… Read more »

Kelly C
Guest
Kelly C

Thank you for this blog post! Since being introduced to your blog by my dietitian, I have been able to fully understand IR and follow your teachings to start turning mine around! BTW, I haven’t felt this good in over 5 years. You are a blessing Dr. Fung and there isn’t enough thank you’s for all that you do and have succeeded in doing!

Doris
Guest
Doris

Hi Dr Jason Fung,
There is no word that can describe how I feel about your work, picture says it all ????????????????????????????????????

Pat
Guest
Pat

??????????????? what is the picture??????

Samuel
Guest
Samuel

Fortunately I have never had a weight problem, and I do not have type II diabetes. My reason for reducing carbohydrates and eventually a ketogenic diet was an improvement in lipid profile. At about 30-50g of carbohydrate per day my blood serum ketone level varies from .5 to 2.5. What makes the low fat claims such a big fat lie for me is the huge and persistent changes in lipid profile. Triglycerides dropped about 60%, HDL-C went up 50%. The particle concentrations went down, and the particle sizes went up. Once I moved into the very low carb ketogenic diet… Read more »

akkamaan
Guest
akkamaan

Samuel!
Here is an amateurs input on a very interesting subject…
Maybe the increase of BG level is because your LCHF diet made your insulin level drop to “all time low”…
Carbs to a certain level may just make a good balance between insulin and BG levels. Dropping carbs below that level might make insulin drop so the bodies natural production of energy (blood sugar) increases a bit. Do the natural sugar production trig the insulin production?

donny
Guest
donny

“Accuracy is relative, however, when it comes to A1C or even blood glucose tests. The A1C test result can be up to half a percent higher or lower than the actual percentage. That means if your A1C is 6, it might indicate a range from 5.5 to 6.5. Some people may have a blood glucose test that indicates diabetes, while their A1C is normal, or vice versa. Before making a diagnosis of diabetes, your doctor should repeat the tests.” http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/ac1-test Your A1C “change” is within the normal variability of the test. So no need to explain a change in blood… Read more »

Sondra Rose
Guest
SWOT
Guest
SWOT

VLCD can cause peripheral (muscle) insulin resistance to preserve glucose for the brain. The brain can only get about 60% of it’s energy needs from ketones; it needs the remaining 40% from glucose which comes from gluconeogenesis in the liver from protein and glycerol from triglycerides.

Maria Czesznak
Guest
Maria Czesznak

I’m so glad you shared this information. I’m a nurse and I do advised some of my patient who are ready to significant changes in their lifestyle and desperate to reverse, manage their condition with no medication to see you. I know GPs are not happy when their hear about your ideas but they should see what they doing does not work at all and my patient within a few years ending up taking more medication than ever before. Thank you for shearing all your knowledge .

Bo Olsson
Guest
Bo Olsson

Very good Dr. Fung.
I have also followed all you lectures at youtube. Thank you very much.
What we are missing now is a complete list of insulin index for food which also shows GI values.
Best regards
Bo

Jerilyn
Guest
Jerilyn

Dr Fung, I have loved all of your videos and articles. Thank you for sharing. What I want to hear but haven’t is about kidney damage due to untreated diabetes. My GFR was 42 and through ketogenic diet went up to 65 but I still eat too much protein. I would like to know what diet and how much protein can I use to reverse my chronic disease. Also, is a water only fast feasible if I take 3 medications for hypertension with this chronic kidney disease?

Bob Briggs
Guest

Dr. Fung, I believe you are the person at the very top of this issue, keep going!!! It was Gary Taubes book that changed my life too. I have read it over and over, highlighted page after page, went ti the local university library to check references, got it on audible to listen to in the car and while walking. I too, remember the day I woke up understanding this issue for the first time and I’ve never turned back from that answer. I lost a 150 pounds because of Gary Taubes, but I never understood the topic fully until… Read more »

JW
Guest
JW

Your page is an inspiration as well Bob. I love the passionate heartfelt way you get your message out, It’s obvious your motivation is to genuinely help people, same as Dr Fung. Both of you are helping people in a way that it doesn’t cost a fortune in supplements/tests/expensive gourmet foods; with plain simple old fasting, butter, fats (the pic of Bob holding the big tub of lard comes to mind 🙂 giving anyone the tools and knowledge to improve their life. Thank you both for your generosity and passion.

Bob Briggs
Guest

Thanks JW, I’m just a avetage guy who tries to explain the works of the real leaders of our movement (like Taubes, Fung, Westman, etc.) in everyday simple terms. The vast majority of people who need this information are salt of the earth, simple hard working people, who if it is explained to them in a way they can relate, will change the world. I try very hard to keep my stuff in the solid science zone, but with humour.

akkamaan
Guest
akkamaan

Samuel!
Here is an amateurs input on a very interesting subject…
Maybe the increase of BG level is because your LCHF diet made your insulin level drop to “all time low”…
Carbs to a certain level may just make a good balance between insulin and BG levels. Dropping carbs below that level might make insulin drop so the bodies natural production of energy (blood sugar) increases a bit. Do the natural sugar production trig the insulin production?

Nate
Guest
Nate

So, you had your epiphany while in bed….maybe you should take a nap once or twice a day as part of your studies???

Anyway thanks for the story and your work.

Mark Leone
Guest
Mark Leone

Thank you, Dr. Fung for your thorough and well-researched teaching on the aetiology of obesity. I read through all your blog posts from Calories I to the present, and your approach of getting to the root cause IR through IF seems to me the link I’ve been missing in 3+ years of LCHF eating with limited success. I do have one question, which I hope you can address. You show that calorie reduction induces the body to slow the metabolism by reducing TEE, etc. And IF induces the body to produce less insulin over time as the body moves toward… Read more »

JW
Guest
JW

I’m happily boarding the Fung “even more trouble” train ride journey; it’s going to be an interesting ride 🙂 I’m wondering what is so bad about Metformin for people with IR/T2/family history, metabolic issues/PCOS/weight reduced. It seems to have many Pubmed articles behind it regarding anti-cancer/anti-ageing benefits. Many of the longevity people take it for this reason alone. Yes it’s a drug, but it’s cheap, been around a long time, a fairly good safety profile considering. It has the same effect on the body as fasting; some people cannot fast for various reasons. Fasting and a LCHF diet have a… Read more »

JW
Guest
JW

Oops typo I mean LCHF haha sorry..that dogma is so entrenched…

Bo Olsson
Guest
Bo Olsson

I think I have found what I was looking for:https://optimisingnutrition.wordpress.com/tag/insulinogenic-foods/
Can I trust the figures in this articel? Are they relevant to Dr Jason´s strategy?
Best regards
Bo

JW
Guest
JW

Yes the author of this site is Marty Kendall who often comments on this blog. He’s done an incredible amount of work putting all those figures together which originated from Australian researchers, and his wife is a Diabetic Type 1. At this point in time his list is the most useful available.

Marty Kendall
Guest

Thanks JW!

Bo, there are some other lists here that are tailored to different situations and goals.

https://optimisingnutrition.wordpress.com/2015/03/22/cheat-sheets/

I’ve been blessed that Jason has been generous in sharing the blog on his site.

Fasting is the ultimate low insulin dietary approach though! 🙂

Helen
Guest
Helen

Hi, Dr Fung. I am a GP from Hong Kong. I’d just like to thank you for your great youtube lectures. I definitely enjoy them and they are true eyeopeners.
I also started my journey with Gary Taubes’ books. I read “Why we get fat” then “Good calories, bad calories”. I’m reading up extensively right now, but I’m still not brave enough to bring all the new(or old?) idea to my work. Because I am afraid of getting into trouble. You are really doing a remarkable job to actually start fasting your DM patients for good!
Best wishes,
Helen

BobM
Guest
BobM

Helen, if you want to continue crossing over to the Dark Side*, I suggest these books:

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Cholesterol-Con-Really-Disease/dp/1844546101/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1440694717&sr=1-2&keywords=malcolm+kendrick

http://www.amazon.com/Doctoring-Data-medical-advice-nonsense/dp/1907797467/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1440694717&sr=1-1&keywords=malcolm+kendrick

http://www.amazon.com/Fat-Cholesterol-are-Good-You/dp/919755538X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1440694752&sr=1-2&keywords=ravnskov

* If you’re not familiar with the Star Wars movies, there was supposedly a “force” that ran through everything. People who used the force for evil supposedly embraced the “Dark Side” of the force.

Once I realizes that the low fat paradigm is really not supported by scientific evidence and likely is doing more harm than good, then I started realizing this occurs in many other areas, too.

Helen
Guest
Helen

I’ve been reading Dr Ravnkov’s book(another one on Kindle called Ignore the awkward) and some other cholesterol myth books. The main problem for me is not to learn about the dark truth but to convince other people. Many patients(and also my co-workers) had been brainwashed by the mass media and drug company. It is difficult to convince them within 10 minutes or so. Many laypeople believe that calcium, vitamin supplements and statins are good and they would actively ask for such things during consultation.

Tomson
Guest
Tomson

Hi Helen, are you still practicing in HK? I’VE BEEN trying to find a doctor to help me go onto LCHF. If you’re willing, I could send you my e-mail address or whatever’s possible/ convenient

Cassandra Cavanaugh
Guest
Cassandra Cavanaugh

Thank you for sharing these personal reflections, and even more for your willingness to rebel against received wisdom on patients’ behalf. Can you do this because your specialty affords you some protection? Dieticians and endocrinologists, I’ve heard, have to prescribe according to the prevailing paradigm or face professional censure. What a disaster. You are the start of the solution.

Dr Pierre de Villiers
Guest
Dr Pierre de Villiers

I remember listening to your presentation in Cape Town hearing “insulin causes insulin resistance” and “its like drugs or alcohol, the more you take, the more you need to take for the same effect – its called tolerance” – then the penny dropped for me as well. Ive used that example to good effect with colleagues and patients. Everyone understands tolerance.

Gunnar Isaksson
Guest
Gunnar Isaksson

Thank you Dr Fung for another great article. Your articles have given me a deeper understanding how LCHF and fasting really works. By using LCHF and fasting, my blood circulation has improved so it’s like when I was a child. My diabetes has also vanished. I know that fasting stimulates healing processes in the body by producing enzymes. You have had so many patients and great success with your protocols and as a nephrolog clearly checked kidney functions, blood circulation and liver function. Regading that, It would be interesting to learn what you have experienced from your patients. It would… Read more »

Claire Lee
Guest
Claire Lee

Thank you Dr. Fung for creating such a wonderful blog. I’m a long-time reader.

Do you have any thoughts on the recent study by Dr. Kevin Hall?
Calorie for Calorie, Dietary Fat Restriction Results in More Body Fat Loss than Carbohydrate Restriction in People with Obesity. Cell Metabolism, 2015; DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.021

I understand a lot of people are saying that this study was too short, or it wasn’t low carb enough, but one thing that surprised me was that while the low-carb subjects had a 22% reduction in overall insulin secretion, the low-fat subjects didn’t. And yet the low-fat subjects lost more fat.

BobM
Guest
BobM

I’m not sure where to start with that study. I have many questions about it. For instance, in the insulin line (see http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131%2815%2900350-2), the number N seems to change from 19 (for the baseline) to 18 for the RC diet to 17 for the RF diet. Are they saying they used data from 19 people for the baseline, but 18 for the RC diet and 17 for the RF diet? If so, how is that even a valid comparison? Also, there was a baseline diet period, then a RC diet period, then another baseline diet period, then a RF period… Read more »

John
Guest
John

Your are referring to “24-hr urinary excretion of C-peptide” which – if I’m not mistaken – is only reported in terms of % change not absolute values and is diagrammed as Figure 2B. However, if you look at fasting insulin which is reported in Table 4 you find that there was a statistically significant decrease compared to baseline in both groups: Insulin (pg/ml) Baseline: 12.6 ± 2 N=19 RC diet: 2.76 ± 0.77 p=0.0024 N=18 RF diet 2.04 ± 0.8 0.021 N=17 The difference between these two changes from baseline was not significant (RC vs RF): p=0.48. They just didn’t… Read more »

Wonnie
Guest
Wonnie

Thank you so much for your work and sharing your knowledge!

Today I came accross Dr. Kendrick’s blog
http://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2015/08/04/turning-diabetes-upside-down/
where he explains a bit more about the glucagon/insulin workings, I believe it is based on dr. Unger’s work. I wonder if I may ask how that fits into the knowledge about diabetes shared here. I am sure it fits, I just am not sure how. Would it be just a matter of rephrasing: eating causes glucagon to rise (rather than insulin), therefore there is more insulin produced, and insulin makes you fat?

Devialini De Souza
Guest
Devialini De Souza

Dear Dr. Fung First and foremost, I would like to express my deep gratitude for your work. Reading your blog has made me understand the nature of diabetes. I have struggled for years, sometimes reduced to tears and mostlyjust felt great disappointment at not being either able to lose weight or if I lost it then not being able to maintain the weight. Your blogs answer so many questions with answers that actually make sense. I am in the process of consulting with my physician and I hope to enrol in your program by next month. More so for my… Read more »

J stokes
Guest

I feel very privileged to have stumbled across Dr Fung, I have stopped all medication and started fasting, this is my second day and I’m feeling better already.
Were I go from here is not clear, when I break my fast I’ll eat my usual vegi food with butter until I gain a greater understanding. Thanks. Fifteen years ago I did a search on metformin and learned it was withdrawn from sale in 1964 because it killed 60% of patients, and then was re-released in 1993 for lack of anything better. I became a rawfoodist.

jw
Guest
jw

You are confusing Metformin with Phenformin,

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Peter Ingemann
Guest
Peter Ingemann

Dr Fung Thank you for your valuable work. My T2D was discovered in 2007. Since then I have been buying tons of drugs including Metformin, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, and injections of Victoza. I obviously changed my lifestyle and diet following the Governement of Denmark Health advise: Preferring slow working Carbohydrates i.e potatoes, rice and non-white bread. Over the last seven years I managed to reduce my weight with some 10kg and was of the opinion that my T2D was under control. In recent consultations with my GP – she however started introducing higher doses of Metformin and Victoza and explained to… Read more »

waleed mahmoud
Guest
waleed mahmoud

A little comment on the phrase ” insulin causes IR”. I think IR develops for a better reason and actually for the good of the human body. I couldn’t understand why it is easy to understand that the human body goes into a starvation mode when deprived from carbs ,and yet we could not envisage the concept of a mirror image storage mode. It makes complete sense that when the body senses the abundance of food that it will try to conserve the newly stored fat for as long as possible. And the best way to do that is by… Read more »

Marjorie
Guest

I’m type 1 how can I fast pls

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Beverly
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Beverly

“Then came the inescapable, horrifying conclusion.” Horrifying. Yes…thank you for feeling your feelings…thank you for speaking your feelings…good mama!!!!

Mike G.
Guest
Mike G.

I had a kidney transplant in 2007 and was diagnosed with NODAT TD2 within two years of my transplant. I am on daily prednisone 7.5 mg as past if my ati-rejection regimen (also CellCept and Sirolimus). My diabetes was controlled for a time by metformin and diamicron-MR. They later added Levemir and Victoza. They had to d/c the metformin because of negative impact on my GFR. Recently they added NovoRapid at mealtime. My insulin is now: Levemir 80 IU in a split dose (40 IU in the morning, 40 IU before bed) plus NovoRapid 8 IU at mealtimes. I recently… Read more »

Marco Adreani
Guest
Marco Adreani

Hi Mike, how are you doing with your transplant? Did you find a way to eat and live better? My father is waiting for a kidney transplant again and I would like to know more when it happens, if it happens…. it’s already been almost three years of waiting now… anyway good luck and let know

Marco

J Davis
Guest
J Davis

I have thought a lot of these things about diet and type 2 diabetes, but hadn’t figured it all out like you did. Great job.

I left the academic science world because it seemed like if you thought outside the box of current theory you would get shot down. The world of doctors seemed even worse. Glad to see you were able to stand up to the establishment, test your theories and spread the word, unlike me.

J Davis
Guest
J Davis

Been thinking that if fasting does increase programmed cell death, clearing away defective cells, maybe the mechanism that makes fasting work for diabetes is to clear cells that are “broken” in the sugar uptake pathway (bad receptors or whatever). I am trained as a molecular biologist and not a specialist in diabetes. However, I was reading how stem cells are believed to cure diabetes by renewing cells, so that is what triggered the connection.

Also was thinking maybe that the main effect of cancer drugs was to make you throw up and fast, but maybe that is a reach.