Why we’re losing the war (on Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer)

//Why we’re losing the war (on Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer)

The first step to solving a problem is to admit that one exists.

I was recently sitting in a department meeting in my hospital, where we had recently raised over $1 million to fund a Centre for Integrative Medicine (CIM) in conjunction with the University. There was great fanfare when it began, a few years ago. The director of the program stood to present to the rest of the hospital what had been done over that year.

In that time, this entire department of 4 or 5 people had managed to do a survey, and took over a program where massage students were giving free massages to patients and staff. This was a program that had already been set up and running, but CIM took it over, which wasn’t difficult, since they were volunteer students. That’s it. In a whole year, they managed one program and took a survey about attitudes. Wow. I thought. That really sucks. In a year, 4 people managed to do work that it would have taken me about 1-2 days. That really sucks. But I didn’t say anything, because it wasn’t really my business.

After she sat done, other managers made some comments. “Great job”. “Congratulations, this is very exciting”. “Excellent work”. This was the gist of the sentiments shared at the table. This is generally how any bureaucracy works. Even though it was obvious that we had just pissed away $1 million dollars, we all needed to pretend that all was great. Nobody, it seems, wanted to yell “The emperor has no clothes”. Dissenting opinions to the prespecified narrative are not welcome. Rather than acknowledge the truth, everybody just wants to pretend everything is just fine, thank you very much. This problem is not unique to my hospital, but is pervasive in all of public health. We all need to pretend that everybody (the academic research community, doctors, dietitians, the nutritional authorities) is doing just great, even as we have an obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic that dwarfs anything the world has ever seen. Nobody wants to admit there is a problem – and therefore we have not taken the first steps to solving it.

Obesity

In the ‘war on obesity’ it is rather obvious that things are not going well. You can take any statistic about global obesity and it will be bad. For example, the CDC recently released obesity statistics for the United States. Yes, it was scary bad. No state in the Union had a prevalence of obesity under 20%. Only 3 states fell below 25%. Yikes. Tragically, in 1985, there was not a single state above 10%. Now, even the best state is double that. Logically, whatever obesity advice we are doling out to the general public on weight loss is not effective. This is the calorie-centric view of obesity as an energy balance problem, as if the human body is some kind of bomb calorimeter with better hair and makeup. Perhaps the low fat diet may even be making it worse – that’s debatable, but it sure ain’t making it better. If it’s not working, then we should change it. That’s logic, but that also means we would have to admit there is a problem. No can do.

So, looking on the CDC website, what advice is being given? “To lose weight, you must use up more calories than you take in. Since one pound equals 3,500 calories, you need to reduce your caloric intake by 500—1000 calories per day to lose about 1 to 2 pounds per week.” Funny, that sounds like the same, old, tired advice that I heard, growing up in the 1970s.

Let’s look at it logically. Here’s what we know.

  1. We are giving the same weight loss advice for the last 50 years
  2. Obesity is getting worse, very quickly

So, all the obesity specialists in all the universities conclude that we should… Keep giving the same caloric restriction advice? WTF? Are these people insane? The first step to solving a problem is to admit that one exists. The problem is that our advice is not useful or effective. Let’s face that hard truth and start moving forward. Instead, there are legions of ‘professionals’ and ‘academics’ who keep screaming that “It’s all about calories”. We’ve focused obsessively on calories (the body, of course, has no actual way of measuring calories) and it’s gotten us exactly nowhere.

Type 2 Diabetes

In type 2 diabetes, we see the same horrifying epidemic. However, in our treatment of type 2 diabetes, we pretended that if only we could give enough medications to normalize the blood glucose, everything would be just fine, thank you very much. So, we did studies to prove our point. The ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, TECOS and other studies all proved the same point. Yes, you could use medications to lower blood glucose, but no, people were not healthier for it. They died at the same rate. They got heart disease and kidney disease at the same rate. Taking the insulin and other medications were pointless. Sure, the drug companies made lots of money and the doctors got to feel good about themselves. But in terms of making patients healthier, no, sorry about it.

Let’s look at it logically.

  1. Using medications to lower blood sugar has minimal benefits
  2. The recommended approach is to give medications to lower blood sugar

WTF?? This is the same tired advice that I gave to diabetics in the 1990s. 25 years later, we haven’t advanced a single bit. The first step to solving a problem is to admit that one exists. If we do not acknowledge the problem that our current treatment approach is incorrect, we have no hope of correcting our course. We’ve focused obsessively upon correcting the blood sugar even as this approach has been proven to fail. Time to man up, and face it. But, that would mean we are deviating from the pre-specified narrative that ‘Everything is awesome’ and that our researchers and doctors are making brave progress against a terrible disease. Admit a problem? No can do.

Cancer

The ‘war on cancer’ has gone similarly poorly. John Bailar III should know about cancer. He worked in the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was editor of the Jorunal of the NCI, statistical consultant to the New England Journal of Medicine and a lecturer at Harvard’s School of Public Health. He started wondering about the effectiveness of the entire cancer research program in the 1970s and left the NCI in 1980.  He wrote a piece in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1986 entitled “Progress Against Cancer?” From 1950 to 1982, there was not a single shred of evidence that medical advances had slowed down rates of cancer or deaths from cancer. If anything, the situation was worse than before.

In 1997, he published a follow up paper called ‘Cancer Undefeated‘ in the same journal. He made the same points as eleven years earlier, that the cold, hard fact showed that cancer as a disease was not getting any better despite the billions of dollars being poured into research.

As an insider on the cancer wars, published in the most prominent journal in the world, here was somebody who yelled out ‘The emperor has no clothes’. The response was stark. He was almost universally reviled within the cancer research community. His motives, his intelligence were routinely called into question. Vincent DeVita Jr, the NCI director called his first paper reprehensible, irresponsible and misleading while implying that Bailar himself had departed with reality. While the personal attacks were plentiful, there was simply no denying the statistics. In the past 4 decades, the crude death rate other than cancer dropped by 24%. Cancer, though has increased 14%. Cancer was indeed getting worse. But nobody wanted to admit it. The first step to solving a problem is to admit that one exists.

In cancer, the past 50 year have focused obsessively upon the genetic mutations as a cause of the problem. While there have been some major advances in some relatively minor diseases (CML and Gleevec), in general, cancer is no more defeated than it was 50 years ago. This approach has gotten us a single step in a thousand mile journey.

Part of the problem lies in how cancer drugs are approved. The FDA approves drugs based on their side effects (toxicity) compared to their efficacy – which can be defined many ways. If drugs help cancer patients live longer then it has a great chance of being approved. This is probably the most important hard endpoint for drugs. Unfortunately, from 1990-2002, 75% of the FDA approvals were given for reasons other than making patients live longer.

The biggest reason for approval to market a medication was the ‘partial tumor response rate’.  This means that the primary tumor shrank in volume by over 50%. This sounds pretty good. What’s the problem with that? Well – it’s completely useless. Cancer kills because of metastasis. Once cancer spreads, it’s far, far more deadly. You need to kill just about 100% of the cancer in order for patients to survive longer.

That’s the reason that surgery and radiation are ineffective once the cancer has metastasized. Imagine that you have a surgical procedure to remove half of the cancer. It would be pretty useless. Every surgeon in the world would refuse to operate because it’s just stupid. And they would be correct. Getting half the cancer is no better than getting none of it. That’s why surgeons always tell patients optimistically, after surgery that ‘We got it all’. Surgeons will cut huge swaths of normal tissues out of cancer patients in their efforts to ‘get it all’.

Getting half the cancer is just pissing in the ocean. It makes not even a little difference to the overall outcome. Yet, over 50% of the new drugs available for cancer were approved based upon this completely useless efficacy measure.  71 approvals were made, based on this hurdle. However, some medications are approved from multiple cancers, each requiring its own approval, so 71 approvals only translated into 45 drugs.

If you look at the more rigorous measure of actually helping save lives, only 12 medications managed to clear this bar in the 12 years from 1990-2002. The duration of life extension is generally only a few weeks or months in the majority of cases. In that same time, the phrase ‘cancer breakthrough’ appeared in 691 published articles. The strange math, according to the terrific, eye-opening book ‘The Truth in Small Doses‘ goes like this.

691 breakthroughs = 71 cancer drug approvals = 45 drugs = 12 drugs that barely extended patients lives

No. The war(s) are not going well. Cancer remains undefeated and even unbothered by our puny efforts. The emperor has no clothes. We need a new approach. Can we just face the fact that the calorie approach is doomed to failure. The ‘blood glucose’ approach is doomed to failure. The ‘cancer is a genetic disease’ approach is doomed to failure. All have been tried over 50 years. All failed miserably. Let’s us admit the problem, so that we can move towards a solution. Time to cut bait.

 

2017-10-11T18:28:20+00:00 62 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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62 Comments on "Why we’re losing the war (on Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer)"

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Roger Bird
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“Come on, Jason. With the kinds of money I’m making with cancer, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease, how can you say that it is a failure?” signed: Dr. Goofball

sean owens
Guest
Terrific piece Dr Fung. I’m reminded of Erasmus who said “prevention is better than cure”. Modern medicine is devoid of cures, only expensive management of complications. Prevention is too difficult to consider as it involves not only change, but as you correctly state, an admission of the current problem. So on we go. The Blue Zones have laid it out quite nicely as to how we should be living, what we should be eating and when we should be eating. A pragmatist would simply look over their neighbors wall to see what they are doing thats working for them, but… Read more »
Bill
Guest
Sad to say, for some reason MANY ‘health’ authorities seem to be stuck in the dark ages. Even worse, when anybody can simply go online to educate themselves, the professionals are apparently too busy. I attended a seminar at my health club, and another at my insurance office. The first was conducted by a registered and accredited dietician and nutritionist, the second by a registered nurse. They both read out of the same book, and neither seemed to have any real knowledge about weight control. The books that they followed verbatim were written in 2006, and you guessed it, pushed… Read more »
Samuel
Guest
I used to be puzzled about the lack of response from insurance companies. Why wouldn’t they be interested in a different approach to obesity and type II diabetes? It would reduce their claims, and provide an easier road to profitability, right? In fact, why wouldn’t Kaiser which is my HMO be very interested in reducing obesity and a different approach to diabetes? Large insurance companies and large HMO’s function more like large government entities, not businesses that sink or swim based on their performance. The more disease, the greater the cash flow, and the greater the cash flow the bigger… Read more »
Tiffany
Guest

“The job of these organizations is to look for a cure, but never to find one”…spot on!

Stephen T
Guest

Too true, Samuel.

We have a health industry, selling ever more products and not overly concerned about which ones work.

MuddyGurl
Guest
Stanford has ‘pilot’ program running for years now in CA, teaching veterans and others about the SAME tired approach, but this is for chronic pain control!!l..so we are to LOAD UP on carbs, despite joints are inflamed by that diet, eat 3 meals and snacks. in one class series I attended they served cheap dry cookies and other sugars as a snack ( at 1PM, right after lunch) this is a class on “GOOD nutrition for pain control” right? .. the woman leading it claimed in a huff”she would not have “hungry adults in her class!!!” what? if they aren’t… Read more »
Roger Bird
Guest
“even as we have an obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic that dwarfs anything the world has ever seen.” Yes, yes, yes. I love Jason for this sort of truth talking, and it is probably why he isn’t all that popular with other health authorities. 52% of adult Americans have pre-diabetes or diabetes2, and this is the the biggest epidemic in the history of the world, percentage-wise and in absolute numbers. And “pre-diabetes” is code for “soon to be diabetic”, “death”, or “doing something about it”. But the truth is that this sort of metabolic malfunction results in all kinds… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest
Roger, we need to keep reminding ourselves that it hasn’t always been this way. There’s some fascinating historical background to diabetes in Gary Taubes book ‘The Case Against Sugar’. According to Taubes, in the mid-nineteenth century diabetes was a disease known to doctors but rarely seen. The mortality records in early nineteenth century Philadelphia show that residents were as likely to be murdered as they were to die of diabetes (page 6). Things have changed. All these medical brains and they don’t seem to be asking why something so rare is now so common. Could it be something to do… Read more »
Roger Bird
Guest
Perhaps it is their pride with regard to being scientific, when “scientific” means being materialistic, reductionistic, and objectifying people. Science has a way to wanting absolute certainty, the absolute certainly that can be found in chemistry and physics, but how do you get that kind of absolute certainty with a statement like, “I think that industrial pollution may be causing autism”, for example. There is no freaking way that absolute certainty of the kind that we can get with chemistry and physics can be gained with really big picture and important issues. So they just say “There is no scientific… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest

Roger, when they agree with the result, they call anecdotes ‘case studies’.

We’re all probably influencing a few people we know, but what a long process that’s going to be, unless there’s some sort of breakthrough.

Thomas
Guest

It is high time that patients start to take these “establishment” to court with a class action! Let them hear our voices in their purses, pockets and reputation! Let us SHOUT so loud, that no-one can hear their old out-dated advice any longer! TIME TO TAKE ACTION, NOTHING ELSE WILL WORK!!!!

Adele
Guest
It just occurred to me that some forward thinking lawyers should go into this field! There is potential for big payouts from the pharm companies, and once doctors find out the general public will be doing their own research, maybe they will start brushing up on preventing instead of treating! I for one, was diagnosed with breast cancer, and had surgery and 33 radiation treatments. What I have since read compels me to believe my “cancer” most likely would not have spread and very well may not have been life-threatening. So I was subjected to a treatment that now makes… Read more »
Pixie A Vincent
Guest

Taking people to court doesn’t fix anything. It has to begin with individual choices. What goes into your shopping cart? What research have you PERSONALLY done on health issues? Have you been telling everyone you can about what you have found works?

Thomas
Guest

You will be surprised to see how quickly Doctors change their advice once a successful court case has been won in a Supreme Court! In ANY other industry, this kind of negligence would NOT be tolerated! How many life’s have been lost as a result of the current dietary guidelines in the USA,- based on bogus science?? No, TIME FOR A CLASS ACTION LAW SUIT I SAY!!

Tina
Guest

Wrong.

Taking people to court would spread the word, inform people, make them question authority.

Roger Bird
Guest

If we count all of the deaths caused by medical intransigence, the medical authorities in the modern world and perhaps only in North America are approaching and may even have surpassed the numbers of deaths of the greatest mass murderers in the history of the world, including the Soviet Union, Communist China, and Nazi Germany.

Sarah
Guest
Jason, I am an RN in Aus and I just LOOOVE your articles, I have been following for a few years now. To me, you’re bigger than any celebrity. What you’re putting out for all to see is simply amazing. Thank you for helping people to take control of their own health and futures. If only I could give advice in my work that is in line with what you write about, unfortunately I would end up like Dr Fettke – only worse, I’m sure of it. I had a patient the other week who was a young guy and… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest
Sarah, Dr Fung has a chapter in a new book called ‘Diabetes Unpacked’. It’s an excellent book. One of the other chapters is written by Dr Ian Lake, who was diagnosed as a Type 1 diabetic. Although he tried very hard to follow the conventional advice, Dr Lake was frustrated by his fluctuating condition. He must have built up a decent relationship with his diabetes nurse because one day she whispered advice in his ear to look up Dr Richard Bernstein. Dr Lake did a Google search for Dr Bernstein and now says, “He changed my life, he almost certainly… Read more »
Nina R. Johnson NC, CPT
Guest
Nina R. Johnson NC, CPT

Wonderful, honest, courageous…thank you for sharing the obvious in such a succinct manner. I appreciate your work, Dr. Fung, so very much

Hannie Truijens
Guest

I wholeheartedly agree,

Steve Ruis
Guest

Be careful. You know the fates of truth tellers in the face of massive economic interests. Big Pharma is more than willing to accept 70 American deaths per day due to legal opioid abuse as reasonable collateral damage in support of their obscene profits,

Lucille Hollander
Guest
When one doesn’t understand something, the reason is usually money. Nothing is going to be done because doctors, big pharma, hospitals, insurance companies, etc. are making plenty of money with their ineffective approaches. Why would they change? There is presently no incentive to admit failure and cut bait. Dr. Fung is refreshing and rare, someone who wants to actually help humanity and get things done. But his article paints a valid picture of the status quo, and as he has pointed out himself with his story about Bailar, painting a picture of the truth is not an adequate incentive to… Read more »
Michèle Wilcox
Guest
The progress report about the CIM made me laugh! Sorry, I know it’s not funny. I guess all of us who have worked in a hospital get the joke. Dr. Fung’s most recent blog posts have reminded me of something Nina Teicholz wrote in “The Big Fat Surprise”: “Despite his other successes, being on the unpopular side of the cholesterol debate made a bitter man of George Mann. As he approached retirement in the late 1970s, a tone of torment crept into his papers. An article he wrote in 1977 began: ‘A generation of research on the diet-heart question has… Read more »
sherm
Guest
I have been watching a series about the Viet Nam war. The interesting thing about it is how small and thin the soldiers are. The American soldiers. A while back there was a series of photos in the NYT about the large swimming pools in the city pre wwii. It showed maybe 20,000 New Yorkers in swimming apparel. Extremely few fat ones. It goes on. I think people are fat because an industry produces a certain amount of food per person and then another industry, the persuasion force, makes sure they eat it all. I think if you track the… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest

Sherm, you’re quite right. I read a lot of history and I’m struck by how slim the soldiers were in the Second World War. The Allied soldiers were fit and well fed, yet they were very lean.

My children don’t notice obese and overweight people because it’s normal to them. I was a child in the 1960s and I rarely saw a fat child. The rare fat kids were from wealthy families who ate fancy stuff like pasta and had lots of sweets (candy).

sherm
Guest

That’s another thing. We used to call my cousin fat when we were kids. My wife used to call her sister fat. But when we look at childhood photos of them, no one would call them fat today. Yes, we were cruel, but that’s a whole other subject.

Teresa Blackard
Guest

When are people going to wake up to fasting? I understanding your frustration, and appreciate all you do!

Ron Reed
Guest

“Do you know the definition of insanity?” My 15 year old teenage granddaughter asked me this question several weeks ago. And this is exactly what Dr Fung is hitting on. “The first step to solving a problem is to admit that one exists” and “The emperor has no clothes” are all suggestive of identifying and fixing the problem, the real problem.

Beppy Michel LMFT
Guest

I love the moral and courageous person you are in this world Dr Fung –I so love the TRUTH of you and believe me many of us are listening and HEALING 💥

Adrienne Boullianne
Guest

you are a pioneer, dr. fung, and i hope you can work against ‘the machine’ to continue to make the world a healthier place.

Linda Bergersen
Guest

Dr. Fung, you are amazingly remarkable, brave, and informative with this article. So many kudos to you. This article needs to be read by all, and unfortunately will not be. Our medical force sucks (not to mention the money-hungry pharmaceutical industry), and needs more and more doctors like you to break the mold.

Milton Alvis, MD
Guest

RIght on Jason!

The media, government (rulers) and money accumulators (so called “insurance”) have long marketed “HealthCare” despite the reality that humans have only created a DiseaseCare system, http://goo.gl/Blh6rW, a system which largely focuses on only symptoms and financially rewards failure, NOT human success(es).

Is there a better alternative?
Absolutely! What I have envisioned, and worked on developing, for several decades.

Terry Henrie
Guest

Please focus an article on T2D that lost weight, eats right and still has acutely high blood sugars without medication.

Glenn Sundbakken
Guest

I love the reports from Jason Fung! But It is all about US. Why Not see the bigger Picture? What is happening in the World? Same problems with Obesity, Cancer and Diabetes type 2. But some Countries are Changing! Canada, Changing the official food pyramid. Sweden wit LCHF / Ketose diets and more and more Fasting. http://www.dietdoctor.com Look at the big Picture! China is probably now surpassing US with Obese and diabetic people. Are Big Food and Pharma moving their focus too Asia? The Cigarette companies are!

Diana
Guest

Thank you for an excellent and honest appraisal of the situation!

Cory
Guest
Healthcare in this country isn’t really ‘health’ care it is more sick care. If you ever expect to see a change with our current epidemics than care needs to shift from reactive to proactive care. Prevention is the only plausible scenario. The problem with prevention is that now the blame and responsibility is on the patient. They need to admit their lifestyle choices (many of which may have come from bad advice from our government or healthcare providers) led to their current state of health and no magic pill will correct it. It takes some hard work and making a… Read more »
Anne Schnedl
Guest
This goes triple for vaccines. Science by proxy is not science – whether the issue is cancer or weight loss or vaccines (and this is a short list of issues for which the politics of science overrides the search for truth). The endpoint for vaccine is antibody generation – not whether it keeps you from getting sick (either from the target infection or as a side effect of vaccination itself). The “safety” data on vaccines is equally dodgy since it is **exceedingly** unusual to have a vaccine tested in a RCT against a **true** (ie: biologically inert) placebo. Most of… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest
Anne, thank you for an excellent contribution. When doctors ask me why I’m sceptical about vaccines, I tell them it’s because of the refusal of drug companies to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated children. This would be easy to do, and, if done properly and transparently, would effectively close the debate. Pharma has a good idea of the harm it’s doing, so this trial will never be done. I refuse all vaccines and encourage other adults to do the same. Despite pressure and financial incentives, large numbers of NHS staff refuse to have the flu vaccine. I’ve seen the adverse effects,… Read more »
Harold Shim
Guest
Hi Jason. Sound like you may have read Travis Christofferson’s “Tripping over the Truth”. Your views exactly summarize the start of his book. In fact much of his book suggests that the tampering of our foods that have existed over 5 or more decades may have fuelled the rising incidence of cancer. In a addition LCHF/IF maybe hopefully part of the strategies to reverse and cure not only obesity and T2DM but also Cancer. I am hopeful but it will be an incredibly difficult journey to fight against the food industry, big pharma as well as the ill informed medical… Read more »
David
Guest

The first step in problem-solving is to recognize the existence of a problem. The second step, which is the equivalent of the portion of the iceberg below the surface is to acquire a thorough and complete understanding of the problem. Acting before the problem is understood runs the risk of causing and layering new problems on top of the original problem.

Greg
Guest

It may be still too early for statistics but surely the HPV vaccine was a breakthrough and promises a significant reduction in several types of cancer. This is the type of research that has yielded a preventative. I hope more reseach will bring similar results.

Stephen T
Guest

Greg, I’m afraid I don’t think that’s right. I’ve seen too many interviews with parents of HPV vaccine damaged children. If we’re barking up the wrong cancer tree, as Dr Fung suggests, these vaccines are simply generating money for pharma and harming some children.

trackback

[…] Nurse Angry admires Dr. Jason Fung https://idmprogram.com/losing-war-obesity-type-2-diabetes-cancer/, and was moved to comment on his most recent blog post, so here it is. She was reminded of […]

Stephen T
Guest

Every doctor, researcher and regulator should read this important article.

How effective are current cancer treatments? How much true consent is there to chemotherapy? I do think people are told the truth or receive good advice. The attached article called ‘Too Much Chemotherapy’ appeared in the British Medical Journal but the medical machine just grinds on.

http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i6027

Peter Hill
Guest
Excellent piece Jason. Just a couple of thoughts: we need to desist from using the term ‘pre-diabetes’ as it makes about as much sense as ‘pre-pregnant’; after all, one either is or isn’t in both instances. Also, we have taken a largely biomedical approach to chronic conditions which are largely the result of aberrant lifestyles, while almost completely ignoring the obvious and dominant self-care element. Self-care speaks to personal responsibility and we don’t like being told that we must bear most of the responsibility for lifestyle-related diseases. And of course, lest we forget, there is no money to be made… Read more »
Brenda
Guest

Sounds like the drug companies are the only ones benefiting from “cancer research”.

thebigpicture
Guest

I like you, Dr. Fung, but you aren’t going to win. Yes, it may be worthwhile helping a few people.

I’m an internal medicine physician who has largely quit. Why be the German soldier at Stalingrad. I, like everybody else, have one life to live.

Ken Stephens
Guest
We are losing the war indeed but it’s important to realize why. Those who we seek help and advice from are actually fighting on the other side, the side that profits more and more as we become more ill. We’ve been subject to an enormous amount of brainwashing here and people have been conditioned to just obey and not ask questions, and it’s working beautifully. Now we’re in the information age and we have ways to access other viewpoints such as those on this site. A relatively small number of people are starting to question the establishment more and it… Read more »
Brad
Guest

Love your writing Dr. Fung. Officially a fan. Would love to see you do an article on why hydrogen peroxide is dismissed by doctors all over the country, taken from the book “one minute cure”. Food grade hydrogen peroxide gives the body oxygen, killing cancer. A doctor won the noble prize in the 1930s proving cancer cannot exist in an oxygen rich environment and instead we devised chemotherapy, which kills red blood cells, blood cells that provide oxygen…

corrie
Guest

*****PLEASE look at the prior posts by Dr. Fung covering obesity and calories etc. Those posts did NOT transfer to this new site correctly***** All charts and graphs are error messages!!! Please do something about this !!!!!

Pixie A Vincent
Guest
The average person out there is not very interested in any lifestyle change that will bring health, or doesn’t “have the time” to figure out what that might look like. It is easier to eat the garbage in the stores and restaurants blindly and feel miserable, but not know why. I work at a hospital and tell as many patients as seem receptive about the documentaries Forks Over Knives and Eating Yourself Alive. Many people are having wonderful results from simply eating a whole-plant-food-based diet, simply. If you add fasting to that, things would like go even faster for the… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest
Pixie, I’m with you completely on advocating a sugar and junk-free diet. I’m glad your diet is working so well for you, but sticking to a plant-based diet didn’t work for me and I usually felt hungry, something that is almost unknown on LCHF. It’s an approach that facilitates fasting, although mine aren’t long by some standards (12 – 16 hours a day). A friend’s teenage daughter has gone entirely vegetarian and it’s been disastrous. She’s gone up two dress sizes in her first year at university and is very unhappy. She knows that sugary food is junk but she… Read more »
Pixie A Vincent
Guest

She probably isn’t getting enough healthy fats and proteins, or she’s not eating whole grains (as compared to whole wheat breads, etc.) I’m rarely hungry. My 20-year-old son does fine on this, too. Too often vegetarian/vegan doesn’t mean a healthy diet. You need the bulky weight of the fiber of plants, as well as healthy fats, like nuts, avocado, and seeds.

BobM
Guest
You don’t need fiber, in fact, reduction of fiber helps with things such as irritable bowel syndrome. I eat very little fiber, no grains whatsoever, few nuts (too high in Omega 6 fats), no seeds (too high in Omega 6 fats). For years, I ate pasta, brown rice and beans, and whole wheat/oats for breakfast thinking this was healthy. I had horrible mood swings, depression, was constantly hungry, felt terrible. Just because you think this is healthy does not mean it’s healthy for everyone. I’m much, much better off eating basically 100% meat diet than I ever was on a… Read more »
Pixie A Vincent
Guest

I would suggest you read the 20-year study condensed for the general populace in the book The China Study. It discusses health issues with animal products.

Stephen T
Guest
Pixie, I agree about the lack of natural fats and I suspect it’s beginning to affect her mental health and energy levels. However, if she adds fat to her current diet she’ll just be adding more calories that don’t ever get burned. She’ll just get fatter faster. She needs to massively drop her carb intake to begin allowing her body to access her stored fat. Unfortunately, I think she’s eating way too many grains of all kinds. I’m sceptical about the supposed difference between ‘healthy’ whole grains and others. It’s grass seed and I can’t see that we’re well designed… Read more »
Pixie A Vincent
Guest
I agree that many of the whole-plant-food-based proponents recommend little fats. I think you need to have a balanced approach to that with a little olive oil and coconut oil here and there, as well as healthy natural ones. However, if eaten with abandon, it can really backfire on the weight! It is a hard thing when kids go off to college and either don’t know a THING about nutrition, or dump everything mom/dad taught them for years. If she is eating the typical American college diet, it’s also typical to gain 15 lbs the first year! The cafeterias aren’t… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest

Pixie, that’s not my experience with eating natural fat. When I reduced my carbohydrate intake and began eating natural fats freely, I found it easy to control my appetite and lost weight without effort. Leptin (the off switch) has a chance to kick in and isn’t overidden by the sugar rollercoaster. I can’t help contrasting this natural control with the seemingly endless hunger of my young vegetarian friend. I do appreciate that she could do it better, but I don’t think she’s unusual in being a bread and pasta fiend. It’s all very sad.

Poha
Guest

Aye, watching the Kona IronMan Triathlon live (NBC) and am “woke” to the announcers’ noting the carb gels. Not so, for the truly elite athletes now: they are fat-adapted and cannot consume those! The one year, a decade or so ago, that GatorAde was not a sponsor, Dr Tim Noakes was invited over to Kona and did a massive study of the process, Keto rules if I reember correctly.

Stephen T
Guest

Chris Froome won the incredibly exhausting Tour de France again this year on a low carbohydrate diet. Endurance athletes are increasingly moving in that direction.

Bruce
Guest
I don’t blame the medical establishment so much as the mainstream media. Who more culpable than those in the news and entertainment industry who gladly accept advertisements of junk foods, allowing them to perpetuate over and over and over and (you get the point) constantly on the boob tube, movie screens, sports events, on and on and (you get the point). Unfortunately marketing works, marketing has gotten better and more pervasive (boob tubes everywhere via cell phones and mobile devices)… I see a ray of light with such “protesters” like Dr. Fung. Funny how someone mentions Erasmus in the comments… Read more »
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