LCHF Summit of Hope

I just returned from Cape Town, South Africa speaking at the world’s first Low Carb, High Fat (LCHF) Summit organized by Prof Tim Noakes and Karen Thompson.  It was truly the best conference I have attended by far.  There are several reasons for this.

First, the lineup of speakers was terrific.  Everybody approached the issue from a slightly different angle and we all learned from it.  For instance, I approached the issue of obesity and diabetes mostly from an insulin resistance standpoint.  Dr. Gary Fettke approached it from a metabolic standpoint, with emphasis on cancer.  Jimmy Moore approached it from a patient’s perspective.  Dr. Aseem Malhotra approached it from a public policy standpoint.  Dr. Andreas Eenfeld from an insulin standpoint.  Dr. Jeffry Gerber and Zoe Harcombe from a  cholesterol standpoint.  Dr. Ann Childers from a mental health standpoint.  Drs. Steve Phinney and Tim Noakes looking at the high performance athlete.  Dr. Eric Westerman from a clinical standpoint.  Dr. Jay Wortman from a native population standpoint.  Christine Cronau from a practical management view.  Dr. Robert Marwan from a bariatric physician standpoint.  Dr. Michael Eades from a protein standpoint.

These were absolutely riveting talks and it was terrifically interesting to me to learn how all these different viewpoints all merged into the concept of proper human nutrition. All the speakers were clearly knowledgable, but more than that, deeply passionate about helping to change the world.  The inspirational Prof Tim Noakes has been leading this charge in his home country of South Africa and wants to lead it across the world.  For that, I congratulate and deeply admire him.  Most speakers heard the bugle call and came at their own expense on their own time to lend a hand.

Karen Thomson

The main reason that I found it such a compelling conference was that throughout these talks there was one over-riding message.  It wasn’t truly about LCHF nutrition.  It truly wasn’t about type 2 diabetes.  It wasn’t truly about surgery.  It wasn’t truly about cholesterol.  More than anything else, this was a message of HOPE.  This was a series of talks that were about how to help patients take their health into their own hands.  Type 2 diabetes is not a lifelong sentence.  Cancer is not unbeatable.  We talk about medicines, drugs and surgery as if they are about health care.  This is false.  They are how we treat illness.  Not how we stay healthy.

This was a conference about empowering people to understand, to learn, and to truly be healthy.  We start with diet because ‘We are what we eat’.  Hippocrates once said “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food”.  That is where we start.  These are the seeds of the real meal revolution.

This was a conference about changing the world.  Prof Tim Noakes started the conference with that pledge. We have only begun.

When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes.

The lectures will be available as an online summit.  I don’t know the price, but it almost certainly will be worth it.  Look for more details to be available on the website at https://www.lowcarbhighfatexperts.com/.

2017-10-30T20:14:43+00:000 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of
Audrey
Guest

Jason can you sort out a query for me. To my understanding only carb intake and resulting insulin causes fat gain. But I heard tim noakes say that some people might need to watch their calories from fat too if they want to lose weight and it’s not happening by lchf. How come? Biochemics of how fat causes people to be fat….?

kfacwpup
Member

LCHF explains some of the question of “What to Eat” but does not address the question of “When to Eat”. This is an entirely separate but equally important part of the equation. If you are eating continuously “grazing”, then that will undo some of the benefits of the LCHF diet. I suggest trying to reduce eating ‘window’. Also, carbohydrates are not the only thing that increases insulin. So do proteins and to a lesser extent, fat. So excessive eating can also lead to weight gain. But they are not all equal. See the series “Hormonal Obesity” for more discussion –… Read more »

Angela Staniford
Guest
Angela Staniford

Hi, I’m signed up with Zoe Harcombe and I know that she thinks fat should not be eaten at the same time as carbohydrate. The insulin that is produced as a result of carb eating will carry on and pack away the fat which is floating by. For that reason many people seriously reduce carbohydrate to minimise insulin production.

Peter Lawton
Guest
Peter Lawton

Jason, I came upon your work just a a few weeks ago (some of your video lectures), and thought how good it would be for you to participate in Capetown; that you have enjoyed the experience, as have the other participants, is great. I hope that you all draw strength and mental stamina from the reciprocal learning. For me, as an enthusiastic amateur, who has been examining the thoughts and papers of most of the participants, this vindicates the time spent understanding how the wheels fell off our collective well-being since I was a young fellow. (A pity some others… Read more »

Bridgette Allan
Guest
Bridgette Allan

Hi Jason
I think you are right about the message being one of hope. What is hopeful is seeing so many skilled medical professionals passionate about healing and passionate about making changes to a failing system.

Thank you for your 2 fantastic presentations . Your approach to reversing diabetes has been a light bulb moment for many. We will certainly be taking it forward in a message to other medical professionals , to our patients and as the preferred method of treatment for diabetics.

It was a privilege to meet you and benefit from your extensive knowledge . Thank you !

Dr M E Moolla
Guest
Dr M E Moolla

Had the good fortune to be present at talks……Excellent+++++
Pity opposing scientists not present for debate……such conventions should be held every 2-3 years

John C
Guest
John C

Thanks for another inspiring post. I would love to hear of any progress that you or any of your readers have had persuading other healthcare professionals and politicians to wake up and take you seriously. I’ve recently had a doctor and a nurse practitioner look at your website while I was in their consulting rooms because they were impressed by my progress, but others seem to bury their heads in the sand. The science seems pretty conclusive to me. Zoe Harcombe’s and Nina Teicholz’s demolitions of Ancel Keys’s work is thorough and plausible. His peer reviewed papers were no better… Read more »

Neville Wellington
Guest
Neville Wellington

Hi Jason
It was such a pleasure hearing you at the conference and confirming all I have been putting into practice with my diabetes patients. Your explanation of insulin resistance was fresh, compelling and accessible and I’ve used it a few times in explaining the issue to patients.
Thank you for coming over and I really hope to see you again at the next conference.
Kind regards
Neville

Dr. Alister Frayne
Guest
Dr. Alister Frayne

Jason, I enjoyed your twin cycle talk – driving both fatty liver,,and fatty pancreas and I echo your comments regarding the calibre of the speakers – absolutely outstanding. It’s certainly shocking that the western world’s dietary authorities have (and continue to) offer nutritional advice advice to their patients based on incoherent and contradictory evidence, including the erroneous calorie in/calorie out theory (otherwise known as the “burn off your fat” theory), and the apparently very tenuous link between cholesterol in the diet, and cholesterol in the circulation – when no casual link has been established between the two, much less with… Read more »

Joy
Guest
Joy

As a Dietitian of many years, this is the first information I have come across in 20 years that finally makes sense of the conflicting recommendations we have been taught / encouraged to support. I have been recommending higher mono and polyunsaturated fat diets (35%), lower carb mostly as high fiber starchy veggies, higher dairy (no low fat) yet perpetuating the 3 meals / 3 snack and “must have breakfast” paradigm. There is hope. If I can see this clear, well presented, physiologically rooted approach and change, other Dietitians and physicians can too.

trackback

[…] in the first Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) convention in CapeTown, South Africa. I wrote about it in a previous post, and I’m happy to say that all the lectures from that historic convention are now available […]