Losing a single gram of fat can reverse diabetes? – T2D 9

Can removal of a single gram of fat from the pancreas reverse T2D? That’s exactly what Dr. Taylor from the UK recently postulated in his latest paper. How is this even possible?

First, a little background. T2D is characterized by two main defects. First, there is excessively high insulin resistance, predominantly in the liver. You can think about it this way. Insulin’s job is to stuff food energy (sugar) into the liver for storage (glycogen). Once glycogen is full, the liver turns excess carbohydrates into fat by the process of DeNovo Lipogenesis (DNL). If the storage bin (liver) is empty, food energy goes in easily.

However, when you already have a big fatty liver and the storage bin is stuffed until bursting, the insulin has a lot of difficulty shoving more sugar and fat into the fatty liver. That’s essentially insulin resistance. It looks like the insulin is not working properly. But in actuality, the problem is that the liver is rejecting the sugar (see last post) because it is already full.

Gradually increasing insulin resistance leads to gradually rising blood sugars. In the Whitehall study, a cohort of healthy patients were followed for many years. Some of these patients were eventually diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The researchers then went back and took out the archived blood samples of these patients to see what their blood sugars looked like before the diagnosis.

At first, the blood sugar only rises gradually, reflecting the gradually increasing insulin resistance. In response to this higher blood sugar, the body secretes higher levels of insulin.  This has the effect of bringing this blood sugar back down.

The insulin resistance is being ‘overcome’ with higher levels of insulin. Ultimately, this is a self-defeating proposition. Since the insulin shoves more sugar in the overstuffed liver, this only creates more insulin resistance. Insulin causes insulin resistance. But, in turn, insulin resistance causes higher insulin levels. A classic self-reinforcing cycle – AKA a vicious cycle.

But something happens about 2 years before the diagnosis of T2D. The amount of insulin falls from very high levels. While the overall level is still high, it is not high enough to ‘overcome’ the insulin resistance and the blood glucose starts to rise. Quickly. Soon, the blood sugars are high enough to make the clinical diagnosis of T2D. This is sometimes termed ‘beta cell failure’.

The beta cells in the pancreas normally produce insulin. It is imagined that they ‘burn out’ from having to secrete so much insulin for so long to cope with the insulin resistance. Thus, they say that T2D is a chronic and progressive disease with beta cells gradually burning out leading to worsening disease over time.

But another possibility exists. Dr. R. Taylor of Newcastle, suggests, in his twin cycles hypothesis, that the beta cells are not actually burnt out. Instead, they are merely clogged with fat. Fatty pancreas, so to speak. The insulin resistance seen in the first phase is due to the fatty liver. The fat in the liver can be exported out to other organs and some of it winds up in the pancreas.

This fatty pancreas causes the beta cell dysfunction, not failure. This is supported by the COUNTERPOINT study that used a very low calorie diet (600 calories/day) over 8 weeks. The beta cells recovered slowly in association with a decrease in pancreatic fat. This proved that the cells were not irreversibly burnt out as had always been suggested. Instead, they were merely clogged, and needed a good clean out.

This was a great start. But the mere association is not enough to prove causation. Was the decrease in pancreatic fat was simply due to overall decreased weight? So Dr. Taylor did a follow up study to pinpoint the role of the fatty pancreas.

He chose patients undergoing bariatric surgery because there was a consistent weight decrease. He divided them into two groups – one with type 2 diabetes and one without (NGT or normal glucose tolerance). Both groups were matched for age (49) and weight (120kg). Post operative weight loss was also similar in both groups (13kg weight loss after 8 weeks).

Fasting blood glucose in the T2D group drops from 9.4 mmol/L to 6.4 and A1C drops from 7.6% to 6.2%. Despite the fact that these patients are still well over 100 kg, they have reversed their T2D. Since the NGT group did not have diabetes, there was only a minor drop in fasting blood sugars. Fasting insulin drops in both groups, though, reflecting improved insulin resistance. This is all as expected.

Now things start to get interesting when Dr. Taylor measures intra-organ fat using sophisticated MRI technology. What is the difference in 2 people of equal age and weight, but one has T2D while the other does not. Why does that happen? It is clearly not only due to the weight. The crucial difference is the amount of fat in the liver and the pancreas.

T2D patients have much higher levels of pancreatic fat. (panel B). This situation is unique to T2D and not found in the obese non diabetic.

Before surgery, the first phase insulin response is also much lower. That is, the pancreas is clogged up with fat and therefore, unable to secrete enough insulin.

8 weeks after bariatric surgery, though, the pancreatic fat in the T2D patients is the same as those with NGT. The insulin response has also normalized. In other words, the beta cells had not failed at all. It was a reversible condition. Clinically, the T2D reversed.

The non diabetic group had normal levels of fat in the pancreas before and after surgery. The major distinguishing feature between these two equally heavy groups of patients is the presence or absence of fatty pancreas. This may answer the question of why somebody gets T2D and another does not. The Fatty Pancreas.

What happens to liver fat?

The T2D group at baseline has a much higher level of liver fat. By 8 weeks after surgery, it has decreased to the level of the pre-surgery NGT group. Insulin resistance essentially normalizes and clinically, the T2D also goes into remission.

So what is the difference between 2 equally obese persons, but one has T2D and the other does not? It’s all about the fatty liver which causes insulin resistance, and fatty pancreas which causes the beta cell dysfunction. It’s not simply about total weight.

There are 2 problems in T2D – insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. In the standard understanding of T2D, they are two entirely different pathophysiologic processes. First, you get insulin resistance. This causes over secretion of insulin resulting in beta cell burnout. So these two problems have two entirely separate and distinct causes. And this can all happen in a few years, since children are now being diagnosed with T2D.

But since when does over secretion of a hormone cause burnout of the organ? Does hyper secretion of thyroid hormone cause thyroid burnout? No. Does over secretion of cortisol cause adrenal burnout? No. Does overexercise of muscle cause muscle burnout? No. Does over thinking cause brain burnout? No. In fact, over stimulation usually leads to hypertrophy, not atrophy. That is to say that increased exercise leads to growth of organs, not fibrosis. Even if there was ”burnout”, this process often requires several decades.

The twin cycles hypothesis makes much more sense. This means that there are not two separate processes that result in T2D. There is only 1 problem – excessive intra-organ fat accumulation (due to hyperinsulinemia). As Dr. Taylor shows, once you remove the intra-organ fat, the insulin resistance and beta cell failure disappears. In that sense, the removal of a single gram of fat from the pancreas can reverse T2D!

Looking at T2D from this vantage point also clears up another so-called paradox. Insulin is an energy storage hormone. So two of its effects are to reduce hepatic glucose production (HGP) and to increase storage of fat via DeNovo Lipogenesis (DNL). So some researcher have called a paradox in T2D that the liver is insulin-resistance because it does not shut off HGP, at the same time that it is insulin sensitive because there is plenty of fat in the liver via DNL.

Of course there is no real paradox, merely a fundamental mis-understanding of insulin in th conventional view. Remember that that liver is like an overinflated balloon. Insulin has a hard time shoving more fat and sugar into a fatty overstuffed liver. So, it tries to relieve itself by pushing out glucose (HGP). That is how you have co-existent effects. Notice how bariatric surgery reduces both fatty liver and hepatic glucose production?

The clinical implications are simply mind-boggling. First, it demonstrates that T2D is not a chronic progressive disease. The two problems (hepatic IR and beta cell dysfunction) are fully reversible conditions and caused by the same intra-organ accumulation of fat. That is amazing news. This means there is hope for all those millions of T2D patients despairing that they have been given a life sentence.

Second, it means we need to focus much more closely on what causes fatty liver and pancreas. We can cure diabetes by removing a single gram of fat. But how do we get that single gram of fat out of the pancreas? Well, we know that bariatric surgery works. But there’s so many complications and risk? What about just doing medical bariatrics – fasting? It’s free, simple, and effective.

2017-10-27T18:48:06+00:0056 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Dev
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Dev

Dr.Fung

Thanks so much.Thanks indeed for bringing latest information every week. Fasting….Fasting & Fasting is the key to unlock the puzzle & clean the clogged pancreas.You rightly said :This means there is hope for all those millions of T2D patients despairing that they have been given a life sentence.

Thanks.

Dev

Dave
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Dave

Thank you doctor Fung for taking the time for helping me, a T2 diabetic learn about and treat this condition. I really appreciate all the information that you have on your blog. Thank you. I was diagnosed with a HBa1c of 9.1 two years ago. My Hba1c dropped to 5.5 by the next blood test (3 months latter) and has stayed there. Also, the fatty liver returned to normal and the kidney stopped leaking protein. My fasting glucose has been more stubborn but longer fasting (7-10 days) is working to normalize that value as well. Thank you (wiping away tear).

Pat
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Pat

hi Doctor Fung, what exactly I need to do in fasting..? is that complete fasting for days or eat once or twice a day and skip Dinner..? I too have fatty lever and T2 diabatic. I am quite hopeful to reverse my diab condition after seeing your video and blog but need to know more on diet and fasting. Please suggest.

Will
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Will

hey Pat, get and read Dr Michael Mosley’s book 8 weeks blood sugar diet. It is based on Dr Taylor’s study mentioned in the article. If low calorie diet for 8 weeks is too much for you, you can also try Dr Michael Mosley’s 5:2 Fast Diet. Also suggest his Fast Exercise book as well. I am T2D and just 1 month on Fast Diet, my H1Ac was down from 9+ to 7+. Fasting sugar was down from 10+ to 6+. BP was down from 160+ to 120+. Weight has gone down from 88+ to 75+ in 13 weeks. I… Read more »

BobM
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BobM

So, if you’re practicing IF, do longer fasts make this process (of removing fat from the liver and/or pancreas) faster or better? That is, is a week of fasting better than 7 days of fasting spread over say three weeks, with “normal” eating between each of the 7 days of fasting?

Can you take any tests to quantify the fat being lost or improvement in operation of the liver or pancreas?

BenG
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BenG

@Bob m — high triglycerides, elevated ALT and low Hdl often point to fatty liver. I wish the researcher measured subcutaneous vs visceral fat… I’m pretty sure the diabetics had higher visceral fat, compared to the non t2d obese.

erdoke
Guest
erdoke

It’s not about visceral, but about hepatic fat (TG) and they did measure that.

SWOT
Guest
SWOT

Except visceral fat is “intraabdominal” includes fatty on the organs… liver, pancreas, intestines, etc.

Seetha
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Seetha

Dr. Fung, Thank you for the great work you are doing to help the diabetics reverse the disease. Im 53 and have been having diabetes since I was 36. Im on insulin for past 14 years. 6 years back in 2010, I had ” corrected ketoacideosis” and was termed as type 1 diabetic. I tested for fasting insulin resistance and C peptide. The results : Fasting insulin is 11.5 and insulin pp is 37.2; Cpeptide is less than 0.01. I started on L carb- high fat diet and have been experiencing very high sugar levels, I have also lost a… Read more »

BobM
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BobM

Thanks, BenG. I find those markers to be confusing. For instance, my HDL has gone up since I’ve been performing IF, BUT when I got a test taken while fasting for 5 days (got the test done of the fifth day of a fast), my HDL went DOWN from where it was previously. The same occurred with triglycerides (went down while normal IF, but went UP — way, way up — on fifth day of fast). So, the short term effect of actually fasting seems to cause (in me) worse values for these markers, but the overall values appear to… Read more »

SWOT
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SWOT

could be a lot of FFA being released from visceral fat when fasting for prolonged periods. First few days, you burn off dietary protein, later it’s more ketones from FFA. Only way to be certain is get a scan to measure. I read for every 10% weight loss, visceral fat decreases 30%

LWC
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LWC

Taylor’s program is for a low calorie (600-800 calories) diet for eight weeks. In his presentation he notes that the liver clears first, it takes longer for the pancreas. Complete stoppage of food might work as well, but most people can’t completely give up food for eight weeks. The question is (what you would need to measure) how long or what intermittent fasting-eating protocol would people need to follow to clear the pancreas of fat. Taylor has shown that eight weeks of a 600 calorie liquid diet plus a bit of fiber (plants like cabbage) get the job done. I’m… Read more »

BobM
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BobM

I do both low carb and fasting. Low carb helped me lose about 25 pounds in a year; fasting (with low carb and increasing my fat content) has helped me lose another 25 in 9 months or so. It also appears to me that fasting has reduced my blood pressure and other markers faster than what occurred using solely low carb. I’ve done many 3 day fasts and one 5 day fast (ate Sunday night, ate again Saturday morning). Had to stop the 5 day fast because my blood pressure got too low. My guess is that T2D could be… Read more »

Margie
Guest

Bob, I have been eating low carb for 35 days now, and my morning sugar level is right at 300 now. I cannot get it down at all. H0wever, I am down 10 pounds in this 35 days, and lots of inches down. I will NOT return to my insulin, as I feel it was killing me with weight gain, and I refuse to weigh 425 pounds, in a wheelchair, with great blood sugars!! I am not one for fasting; never have been, and I feel that eating 600 calories a day would only slow my metabolism even further, so… Read more »

Monica
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Monica

Margie, great job! keep going it is working. I have reversed my type 2 diabetes and gone off my blood pressure medication with low carb and fasting. I have to tell you though I was totally stuck for a year, unable to budge a pound or blood sugar. That is when I discovered fasting- and boom- I’m moving in the right direction again. It’s like adding jet fuel to your car-please don’t dismiss it quite so quickly.

Shelley
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Shelley

Dr. Fung, Many thanks for all your time and energy to explain the nuances of this disease and how to reverse it. I am eternally grateful. Of the group of bariatric patients in the study you describe, I cannot help but wonder…….why do some of those patients at that level of obesity develop T2DM and some do not. It is puzzling that fatty liver and insulin resistance do not automatically follow obesity in general. So, I wonder if it simply comes down to genetics. For now, LFHC and fasting are the way to reverse disease in most T2 diabetics it… Read more »

erdoke
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erdoke

I think you are mostly right about dissecting the course of the disease. The only thing that still stands out is misunderstanding insulin’s actions… I believe that insulin is not really a storage hormone, but rather a catabolism inhibiting one, therefore storage is the consequence. Also, what is measured as hepatic insulin resistance might not be hepatic at all. First of all, hepatic glucose production is also regulated by two inhibitory effects of insulin localized outside of the liver: reducing glucagon production in alpha cells and reducing lipolysis in white adipose tissue. Mechanistically failure of inhibiting either of these results… Read more »

erdoke
Guest
erdoke

Well, in case of fat storage, the same receptor is responsible for inhibiting hormone sensitive lipase and activating lipoprotein lipase, so insulin is both an anti-catabolic and a fat storage hormone for WAT. :o)

kolin
Guest
kolin

Erdoke

What is WAT Insulin Resistance ? What is WAT stands for.

mike
Guest
mike

@kolin

White Adipose Tissue. erdoke refers to it earlier in the post, but doesn’t define it as the acronym.

erdoke
Guest
erdoke

Yep, sorry, it stands for white adipose tissue.

Sally
Guest
Sally

As usual very informative post.I was hoping to check for fatty liver via blood,but was told they use ultrasound for it.Was also disappointed to see our rountine blood tests do not check insulin levels just glucose(even in T2 diabetic spouse).

According to some doctors an A1c.of 5.7 is still causing cellular damage.Mine is 5.6. I think my spouse and I would both benefit from a bit of fasting and cleansing.

Wenchypoo
Guest
Wenchypoo

Ok, so how do we go about targeting our fat removal so the liver and pancreas get a good cleanout…fasting, or what? You eloquently described the problem, but failed to include a solution (other than bariatric surgery, which you previously posted as “forced fasting”).

It seems EVERYTHING comes back to fasting.

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Bob Niland
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Bob Niland

re: …the beta cells are not actually burnt out. Instead, they are merely clogged with fat.

Are there some implications here for reversal in some cases of T1D and LADA?

SWOT
Guest
SWOT

@Dr Fung, Exercise seems to help too..not lose weight per se, but reducing visceral fat: If I recall hearing Robert Lustig correctly, MD., 80% of Obese and 40% of the non-obese in the US have metabolic syndrome, http://www.caloriecount.com/forums/weight-loss/dont-sumo-wrestlers-heart-disease “Sumo wrestlers are a colorful and instructive exception. Big, big eaters and artificially obese, they look like prime candidates for heart disease and diabetes and would definitely fail the belt test. Nevertheless, Hamdy reports, they are “extremely insulin sensitive and don’t have hypertension.” Body scans reveal that sumo wrestlers typically have little visceral fat, presumably because they exercise six to eight hours… Read more »

SWOT
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SWOT

If I recall another article about sumo wrestlers, they typically glycogen deplete themselves working out in the mornings after fasting all night. Thus they intentionally intermittent fast and end up glycogen depleted by the time they eat their huge meal later in the day.. Then they feast on beer, sushi and rice. Given that 100% of fructose/alcohol goes straight to the liver, whereas about 80% of glucose goes around the body (20% goes to the liver), I’d speculate the beer wouldn’t be so much of a problem since it rebuilds the empty glycogen stores instead of spilling over, so much… Read more »

kolin
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kolin

Swot- Thanks.Your link about Sumo Wrestlers is very interesting.Here is another informative article in the same line : https://www.quora.com/Are-sumo-wrestlers-more-likely-than-other-people-to-have-health-problems Active rikishi usually don’t develop health problems other than injuries – the problems come after retirement. There are studies that show that while active rikishi have a high amount of subcutaneous fat (fat that’s stored right underneath the skin), they have a lower than average amount of visceral fat (fat stored around the organs). The latter is considered to be more dangerous than the former. But when a wrestler retires and becomes much less active, he may accumulate more of the… Read more »

kolin
Guest
kolin

Study explains decrease in insulin-producing beta cells in diabetes Summary: Scientists generally think that reduced insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is due to the death of the organ’s beta cells. However, a new study shows that beta cells do not die but instead revert to a more fundamental, undifferentiated cell type. The findings suggest that strategies to prevent beta cells from de-differentiating, or to coax them to re-differentiate, might improve glucose balance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Scientists generally think that reduced insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes,… Read more »

Matt
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Matt

I have heard this as well. This brings up an important point, however. Could it be that removing fat from the pancreas, lowering blood sugar levels in general, and/or some other factor associated with these things causes these cells to redifferentiate and once again produce insulin?

Dana
Guest
Dana

I have been using Dr Fung’s fasting program since last May. I am a T2D. My A1c was 5.7 when I began and is now 5.2, despite having ditched all meds in July. The weight is coming off very slowly, but is coming off. 12 pounds so far. My Doctor typically doesn’t check insulin levels but I had her check it this week. Mine is at 12.5, which seems high.

Does anyone have an understanding of insulin levels? I don’t know if 12.5 is good or bad…

Dev
Guest
Dev

Dana What Are Normal Insulin Levels? According o Dr.Mercola :Your fasting insulin level can be determined by a simple, inexpensive blood test. A normal fasting blood insulin level is below 5, but ideally you’ll want it below 3. If your insulin level is higher than 3 to 5, the most effective way to optimize it is to reduce or eliminate all forms of dietary sugar, particularly fructose. http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/04/27/vitamin-d-and-blood-test-health-factors.aspx Your insulin levels will be typically measured in micro units per milliliter (mcU/ml or mIU/ml). However, experts often disagree on what should be the “ideal” levels of glucose. According to Health Central,… Read more »

Dana
Guest
Dana

Thanks for that, Dev. Confusing thing is that I eliminated all sugar, fructose, refined carbohydrates in 1998. I rarely even eat fruit – strawberries 1x a year. I developed T2D in 2009. [diabetes runs in my family] I wish I had my starting insulin level because I suspect it has decreased since I started Dr Fung’s program in May. Thanks again!

Pat
Guest
Pat

Hi! I am glad to see someone talking about fasting insulin levels. At my insistence, my doctor requested the blood test. It came out low normal. His reluctance stemmed from the fact that he did not understand the significance of any reading of insulin levels and did not feel that that knowledge would change his treatment advice. That leaves me not knowing the significance either.
After reading this thread, it would seem that a low normal reading would be a good thing.
Can anyone comment more about this, please?

DB
Guest
DB

Dr Fung,

Can people who have diabetes for a long time (let’s say over 10 years) come off all diabetic medications after following your program?

karin
Guest
karin

DB: read the other sections of the blog and you will see Dr. Fung has had great success weaning diabetics off meds with fasting. However , you would need to be under doctor’s care since your meds will have to be modified as the fasting “does its magic” …

SWOT
Guest
SWOT

@Kolin, No problem. On the opposite side of the extreme, I saw an episode of supersize vs superskinny fat with this super skinny-fat guy who ate something like 900 calories a day of sugar and little else. No doubt he probably had high visceral fat with even though he looked like a stick since the fructose in sugar fills up glycogen very quickly and all the “spill over” leads to to metabolic syndrome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhJ43q6yBK0&t=26m25s

Drifter
Guest
Drifter

Dr. Fung. Thanks for such a great and informative series. I am really enjoying it, learning a lot, and eventually plan to do a longer fast just to see what happens, although I don’t think I really need it for the typical reasons. A slight quibble with this post…I suggest dropping the idea that “over-stimulating a muscle does not cause muscle burnout” since overtraining (a huge topic) is a very well-known issue in the strength community, and while I don’t remember all the mechanisms, it is very common to experience something which is effectively muscle burn-out where you actually lose… Read more »

Wenchypoo
Guest
Wenchypoo

As of Dec. 24th, I guess HealthDay News agrees with you: http://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/weight-loss-news-703/losing-pancreas-fat-treats-type-2-diabetes-706001.html

This is the quickest I’ve ever seen something go from Dr. Fung’s mouth (or blog) to the mainstream press!

LWC
Guest
LWC

With all due respect to Dr Fung, it is Dr. Taylor’s work at Newcastle University that is receiving mainstream attention because his research as shown (with published data) that with the reduction of fat in the pancreas, pancreatic function resumes. The link you provide is talking about studies of bariatric surgery patients, however, Taylor’s group has measured the same effect without surgery and published those results. The Newcastle program is extremely low calorie (imposed via an 8 week course of a commercially available liquid diet) rather than a complete stoppage of food as Fung advises. Fung’s way might work even… Read more »

Michael
Guest
Michael

So even if your blood sugar is a little high (like 150 fasting) is it still favorable to not use a basal insulin and to fast?

Daryl
Guest
Daryl

Dr. Fung, thank you for the inspiration and hope. I’ve tried to out exercise diabetes; I’ve tried to out diet the diabetes. I’ve had some success, but not the real victory I’d like. I’m taking “baby steps” on the fasting now, setting up three days per week to do a 16 hour fast. Everyone’s ready to medicate us, but not many provide a vision of hope that you are supplying. Blessings!

Anne M. Muasya
Guest
Anne M. Muasya

Dr.Fung. I live in Africa and would like to join your programme to reverse diabetes. I need more information on fasting. Won’t I go into low sugar if I don’t eat for 8 hours? I would really love to stop taking drugs . Thank you .

stenB
Guest
stenB

Try reduce carbs and increase fats before you fast will help to keep blood sugars balanced. The fasting will then also start burning fats sooner. Good Luck!

Patrice
Guest

I need more specific directions for fasting What is the minimum fasting time.
Can I go on a liquid diet?
Is there a product on the market for liquid dieting?

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[…] of the value of removing visceral fat for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the post Losing a single gram of fat can reverse diabetes?  The author is all about fasting & thinks that fasting is likely to work as well as bariatric […]

Roger S
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Roger S

I had pre-diabetes and diabetes for almost 19 years now (51 yrs old now) and i manage it with diet. My fasting glucose is averaging about 7.2. My diet is mainly high fat / low carb. I am skeptical that this will work if someone had diabetes for longtime like myself. In case I followed this strict wight loss program and it did not work, does that mean that beta cells are damaged?

Kaiden Fox
Guest

I have adrenal burnout, and was told that constant stress lead to this condition. That lead to me having very low AM Cortisol levels and requiring 10mg of Prednisone to function.

Can you elucidate more on this?

Rich E
Guest
Rich E

Roger S, If it wasn’t a high Fat, Low Carb diet, you should try that

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[…] pancreas also gets some fat and you get fatty pancreas. As the pancreas becomes distended with fat, it produces less insulin. Why? Because it’s […]

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[…] pancreas also gets some fat and you get fatty pancreas. As the pancreas becomes distended with fat, it produces less insulin. Why? Because it’s […]

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[…] T2-diabetekseen asti kehittynyt insuliiniresistenssi merkitsee sekä maksan että haiman rasvoittumista. Tämän artikkelin mukaan haima ei sinänsä ”pala loppuun”, vaan rasvoittuu niin että ei enää pysty täysitehoisesti tuottamaan insuliinia: ”the beta cells are not actually burnt out. Instead, they are merely clogged with fat. Fatty pancreas…” […]

asadulla
Guest
asadulla

dr .fung your name it self become a great sucess in india there is a man named veera machaneni ramakrishna who studied about ur books and invented a stanadrd keto diet which is indianised and at about 20 millon people start following it.having lot of sucess.reverting ty2d.blood pressure.orthrits.thankyou very much.

Tyler
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Tyler

Just felt I’d comment here. I just put myself (a type 1) and my cousin (a very poorly controlled long term, over-weight, sedentary type 2) into the EXTREME fasting/keto protocol elucidated in the Feb 2017 study which showed pancreatic regeneration. ( http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39070183 ) It took him 4 days. FOUR DAYS. To go from 60 units of insulin + Metformin + Novo and still being extremely uncontrolled between 240-340 bg… To down to 4 units of lantus twice a day + about 2-4 units of Novolog a day to be controlled between 120-140. The first day of the extreme keto (almost… Read more »