Fasting and Ghrelin – Fasting 29

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Ghrelin is the so-called hunger hormone. It was purified from rat stomach in 1999 and subsequently cloned. It binds to growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor, which strongly stimulates GH. So, for all you people who thought that eating makes you gain lean tissue, it is actually the opposite. Nothing turns off GH like food. Of course, food provides the nutrients needed to grow, so in fact, you need both feeding and fasting cycles to properly grow. Not all feeding, and not all fasting. Life lies in the balance of the two. The cycle of life is feast and fast.

Ghrelin, has also been found to increase appetite and weight gain. It also antagonizes the effect of leptin (in rats at least). Leptin, as you might recall, is the hormone produced by fat cells which turns off appetite and makes us stop eating. Ghrelin turns on appetite. So, if you want to lose weight on a long term basis, you need to tune down ghrelin.

So, how to do that? As we discussed last week, eating all the time sounds like it will turn off hunger and ghrelin. But that’s far too simplistic. Surprisingly, the answer is the opposite – fasting.

Let’s look at this study “Spontaneous 24-h ghrelin secretion pattern in fasting subjects“. Patients undertook a 33 hour fast, and ghrelin was measured every 20 minutes. Here’s what ghrelin levels look like over time.

There are several things to notice. First, ghrelin levels are lowest at approximately 9:00 in the morning. This corresponds to the measures of the circadian rhythm which find consistently that hunger is lowest first thing in the morning. Recall that this is also generally the longest period of the day where you have not eaten. This reinforces the fact that hunger is not simply a function of ‘not having eaten in a while’. At 9:00, you have not eaten for about 14 hours, yet you are the least hungry. Eating, remember, does not necessarily make you less hungry.

Next, notice that there are 3 distinct peaks corresponding to lunch, dinner and the next day’s breakfast. BUT IT DOES NOT CONTINUALLY INCREASE. After the initial wave of hunger, it recedes, even if you don’t eat. Ghrelin shows a “spontaneous decrease after approximately 2 h without food consumption”. This correlates perfectly to our clinical experience that ‘hunger comes in waves’. If you simply ignore it, it will disappear. Think of a time that you were too busy and worked right through lunch. At about 1:00 you were hungry, but if you just drank some tea, by 3:00 pm, you were no longer hungry. Ride the waves – it passes. Same goes for dinner. Further it has been shown that ghrelin spontaneously decreases independently of serum insulin or glucose levels.

Also, note that ghrelin does have a learned component since all these subjects were used to eating 3 meals per day. It is not merely by coincidence that these peaks of ghrelin happen. This is similar to the ‘cephalic phase’ of insulin secretion that we’ve discussed previously.

There was one other big finding of this study. Look at the average ghrelin levels over 24 hours. Over the day of fasting, ghrelin stays stable! In other words, eating nothing over 33 hours made you no more or less hungry than when you started! Whether you ate or did not eat, your hunger level stayed the same.

As we discussed in our last post – eating more sometime makes you more hungry, not less. In the same vein, eating less can actually make you physically less hungry. That’s terrific, because if you are less hungry, you will eat less, and are more likely to lose weight.

So what happens over multiple days of fasting? This study looked at the question specifically. 33 subjects had their ghrelin measured over 84 hours of fasting and they divided the results by men and women, as well as obese and lean. There were no significant differences between the lean and obese subjects, so I won’t dwell on that further. Once again, there were distinct circadian variations.

Over 3 days of fasting, ghrelin gradually DECREASED. This means that patients were far LESS hungry despite not having eaten for the past 3 days. This jives perfectly with our clinical experience with patients undergoing extended fasting. They all expect to be ravenously hungry, but actually find that their hunger completely disappears. They always come in saying ‘I can’t eat much anymore. I get full so fast. I think my stomach shrank’. That’s PERFECT, because if you are eating less but getting more full, you are going to be more likely to keep the weight off.

Notice, also the difference between men and women. There’s only a mild effect for men. But the women show a huge decrease in ghrelin. Again, this addresses one of the major worries that women are not able to fast. Actually, women would be expected to have more benefit from fasting because their hunger can be expected to decrease better than men. Notice, too, how much higher women’s ghrelin level reaches. I suspect this correlates to the clinical observation that many more women are ‘addicted’ to certain foods eg. chocoholics. Sugar addicts. etc. So many women have remarked how a longer fast seemed to completely turn off those cravings. This is the physiologic reason why.

A few other notes about the hormonal changes of fasting. Notice that cortisol does go up during fasting. Yes, fasting is a stress to the body and cortisol acts as general activator as well as trying to move glucose out of storage and into the blood. So, if too much cortisol is your problem, then fasting may not be right for you.

Insulin also goes down, which is what we expect. Growth hormone, as we’ve previously noted, goes up during fasting. I suspect this helps to maintain lean muscle tissue and to rebuild lost protein when you start to eat again.

However, the main point of this post is to show that over intermittent and extended fasting, ghrelin, the main hormonal mediator of hunger does not increase to unmanageable levels. Rather it decreases – which is exactly what we are looking for. We want to eat less, but be more full. Fasting, unlike caloric restriction diets is the way to do that.

2017-10-12T21:44:16+00:00 76 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Amotlfoth
Guest
With alternate day fasting (36 h each fast, 3x per week) the hunger was quite strong at the beginning. Drinking lots of cold water during a wave of hunger helped. But I am happy to report the hunger is much much less after practicing alternate day fasting for 2 months. The hunger early on was brutal – now it’s a breeze. It helped that my husband embarked on it with me. I have already achieved my weight loss goal, but continue the alternate day fasting to see where it leads. I had not set a goal of my weight in… Read more »
Juan Bucio
Guest

If I’m looking at the chart correctly the most benefit on getting GH is on the second day of fasting? How would this be done as far as an eating pattern standpoint?

wang tao
Guest

Dr. Feng thanks for great articles, after practicing your fasting strategy for half a year, I find that many times when I eat is not because of hunger, but because the brain suddenly appears to have a strong idea of eating some kind of food, and hormones are Can not control the idea, which makes me very troubled. Do not know other friends have such trouble. Very much hope you can give good advice, very grateful.

David
Guest

But does the reduction survive in the week after the fast when the patient returns to “normal” eating?

Missing Link
Guest
How do I know if I have a problem with cortisol? I am T2 diabetic, overweight, and have been doing some 14-15 hour fasts (eg 10pm to 1pm) to see how my body responds before trying a longer fast. While hunger does not really seem to be a factor I do have some slight rises in my blood sugar throughout the morning before tapering off around 10 am to what I would consider my “normal” fasting levels. I interpret this as the Dawn Phenomenon and, from what I understand, it is my body releasing glucose from storage in response to… Read more »
Walt
Guest

I think worrying about if you have a cortisol problem will cause a cortisol problem as worrying is stressful. What you said sounds like insulin resistance. Try a five day water fast. It’s all downhill after the 2nd day. That will 1) do wonders for you intra-organ fat and 2) do wonders for you confidence you can handle fasting. If you can do 5 days of water only going 24 or 36 or even 72 hours w/o food (lots of water though) will be a snap.

WadeR
Guest

I can’t say about your cortisol but my wife after learning to control her sugars the dawn phenomenon goes away. (at least for her)

Walt
Guest

I think people are confusing Dawn Phenomenon with a bad thing. As described by Fung, it’s perfectly normal and occurs in everyone that wakes up, before they wake up as a prelude to waking up.

Sue
Guest

Missing link… you said:
‘it is my body releasing glucose from storage in response to the “fright or flight” mode. Does cortisol play a role in this process?’

Yes…Adrenaline, Cortisol, Norepinephrine are the three major stress hormones that mobilize your body for action.

Pete
Guest

Dr. Fung, Thank you for another fantastic post!

Tim
Guest

If you have high cortisol fasting may not be for you? Blanket statement end stop? Why not post a link to where you know how to control fasting I’ve read your book Obesity Code at least 3 times now and never remember you saying such a thing.

Isabela
Guest
I am one with high cortisol, especially at night, and fasting was really bad for this. When pre-menopause hit I wasn’t able to sleep anymore, only a few hours per night. Also I was really “jumpy” and anxious. Last October was a nightmare. However, after lots of experimenting, I found that stress and exercise are not my friends, especially in the afternoon, but I needed relaxation (not necessary meditation, which I still can’t do, but crafting, laughing, walking in nature etc). Also, the main supplement that helped with high cortisol was phosphatidylserine (400-600mg before going to sleep). Now I can… Read more »
Danielle
Guest

HI Isabela,

Just wondering what kind of ‘problems’ you had in a 24h fast? What symptoms indicate that fasting was not for you because of cortisol?

Thanks!
Danielle

James
Guest

I also found this alarming, having read both books! Hope there is a substantive response to this, or at least expanding on what exactly this means.

Walt
Guest

Dr Fung discusses cortisol in more depth in Complete Guide to Fasting. He basically said generally, in his practice, he has not found this to be an issue but in one case it was and it forced ‘changing the strategy”. If you are concerned you should exercise more as that is far more relaxing that watching TV, per Dr Fung. Also try ‘mindfulness’ and meditation, also covered by Dr Fung.

Prashant Gokhale
Guest

Dr. Fung, thanks for the great article. How do you read the terminal spike in insulin?
Looks like day 2 is flattish. Day 3 falls. And then it spikes on the morning of day 4.
Is that a case for multiple 72 hour fasts?

Stevo74
Guest

I suspect that they broke the fast that last morning, right before the end of the study.

donny
Guest

The spike in insulin on day 4 comes from eating breakfast.

BobM
Guest
I have never found this to be true: “They all expect to be ravenously hungry, but actually find that their hunger completely disappears.” I do typically experience less hunger over time (in days), but hunger comes in waves, and not always do I experience this. One time of 4.5 days fasting (eat Sunday night, don’t eat again until Friday at lunch), I got famished — and I mean famished — on Thursday night. It was all I could do to make it to Friday. Weight lifting also seems to cause more hunger (whether fasting or not, but particularly when fasting).… Read more »
Lori
Guest
Agree about the cold. Have been doing IMF for about a month and cold has been a problem but hoping the weather gets warmer. Using more blankets has helped. With a BMI over 30 I am not used to being cold! Have more energy. I sleep ok because I have to take melatonin to counteract the acid reflux I seem to get from fasts longer than 24 hours. Hunger has been a problem lately too. For the first week of the IMF I had lots of events (friend’s daughter’s wedding, business events) where I knew I would be tempted to… Read more »
Monique
Guest

Thanks BobM – would be most interested to hear your experience. I am also trying a fast during the week/eat on weekends approach and it is incredibly tough, but I am determined to get the better of my hunger, even though it feels very extreme and painful at times.

wang tao
Guest

I found that many times I could not control to eat, not because of hunger, but because the brain suddenly appeared the idea to eat something , and ideas is difficult to control by
hormone . Are you the same?

Terry teh
Guest

It is just an idea. The more you are involve in this idea, the more you become hungry.

Your mind is hungry. Your body is not hungry. Make sense?

Just ignore it and it will disappear like a phantom.

wang tao
Guest

Thank you for your answer, your solution sounds pretty good but hard to do. Because people are not completely rational, I hope someone can find an effective solution.

Terry teh
Guest

I reply this way to you as you are a Chinese. This is a Taoist or Buddhist approach.

No need to see psychologist on how the mind work. This is meditation 101.

Works for you?

Terry teh
Guest
Let me try it another way. Learn to trust your body instead of your mind. It is your body that breathes and make your heart pump. The mind cannot control these bodily function in anyway. If it does,there is every chance we will suffer ehen you sleep. The more the mind searches for an answer the more it will attempt to manifest. This is what is call psychosomatic. The stronger it is, the stronger the hunger . You may have to go thru more days of hunger than normal ,once you get over it and trust the body you will… Read more »
wang tao
Guest

As far as I know, bodybuilders can insist on dieting because there are games, personal coaches and models can insist on diet because of the need to rely on a good body to make money. For ordinary people, this expedient is difficult to long-term effective. We should find a way to easily long-term adherence.

wang tao
Guest

I tried meditation this morning, and I could really control the idea of eating something. Thank you for your suggestion, my email address is: ads98163@163.com, hope we can be a good friend.

Terry teh
Guest
wang tao
Guest

This is one of the best solutions I’ve ever read about controlling heart addiction. Thank you very much.
what your facebook username is and hope to communicate frequently.

wang tao
Guest

Sometimes we need to control the body with mind, and sometimes we need to believe in the body, not the mind.

wang tao
Guest

I think Dr. Feng ignored the bigger problem of emotional eating , and if you do not solve the emotional eating problem, adhere to fasting is very difficult.

sten bjorsell
Guest

Wang Tao!
I mix the juice from half a lemon in 2 litres water. Whenever I feel hunger I drink another sip of water and forget the hunger. Some days 2 litres last all day, other days I must make up one more jug. I also stopped smoking in the same way, now over 10 years ago. It worked fine for me, for 5-day fasts. Maybe it can help you.

Luke
Guest

When should you eat relative to exercise (weight training) if you practice intermittent fasting?

Stevo74
Guest

Luke,

There are many who recommend working out right before ending your fast.
Personally, I get my best workouts in while fasted, especially in the morning. My max lifts are usually 10-25% heavier while fasted. I haven’t seen any benefit though to eating immediately after your workout.

Ash
Guest

I do my 30-45minute strength training workout around 8am. I break my fast in the afternoon. I have found that the workout makes it easier for me to continue my fast.

the intelligent omnivore
Guest
the intelligent omnivore

Another great article and it mirrors my experiments with 24 hour, 48 hour, 72 hour and longer fasting.

Monique
Guest
I really struggle with hunger and do not experience it in the way described. When my stomach is really empty I have a burning, cramping pain that ramps up and up until I finally eat something. I liken trying to function normally in this state to “attempting to carry on a casual conversation while resting my hand on a hot stove.” I have had this as long as I can remember and really believe that this panic inducing situation is at the root of much of my overeating. The first time I attempted a 24 hour fast I ended up… Read more »
Walt
Guest

Monique, the brain is very poor at differentiating hunger from thirst. Even for those eating or eating regularly (no fasting at all) drink 16oz of water 30min before you eat and you’ll eat less. Another factoid, your brain will not signal full until abt 30mins after you actually are ‘full’. This is what leads many to be inadvertently over eating. As it relates to hunger while doing a water fast, drink more water, I’d say two liters or more per day. You may find that reduces your hunger.

Stephen T
Guest

Walt, the 30 minute delay from eating to feeling full is important and very good advice. I break my fast with a drink of coconut oil and try not to eat more food for another 30 – 45 minutes. I think this helps to prevent overeating.

Steve
Guest

And folks, don’t forget the salt. Very important to avoid chills and cramping. Broth is a great salt delivery mechanism.

Stephen T
Guest

Steve, a good point. I add salt to my coconut oil and add a bit of lemon flavour. I also found magnesium helped with leg cramping.

Stephen T
Guest
Monique, I don’t see the sense in putting yourself through all that, although some people clearly like the challenge. Bearing in mind the junk-laden never-stop-eating ways of many people, do we have to aim for the extreme opposite end of the spectrum? Isn’t just eating a far healthier LCHF diet with some fasting good enough? It is for me. I admit that I don’t have a problem with my weight and came to low carb for health reasons. I soon found that I had much greater control of my appetite, so I thought I’d try some fasting. I now do… Read more »
wang tao
Guest

I found that many times I could not control to eat, not because of hunger, but because the brain suddenly appeared the idea to eat something , and ideas is difficult to control by hormone . Are you the same?

Lori
Guest
You may have a physical reason for your pain, such as an ulcer or other problem that is medical. Perhaps consider speaking to a physician as to the cause. To be honest although I feel fine during a 24+ I have had some reflux and bowel problems (not constipation!) that make it more difficult. Also are you taking apple cider vinegar (or any other type)? I have found that makes the reflux worse for me and things have improved since I stopped taking it (during my first 2 weeks would have two or more teaspoons mixed with water). I do… Read more »
Monique
Guest
Many thanks for all the responses and some helpful advice. Just a few additional points that may clarify my situation: 1) Walt: good hunch on the thirst thing. My mother used to suggest the same! However, I drink copious amounts of water and tea. At least 3 litres a day. I am prone to kidney stones so I dare not skimp on this. So I don’t think I am confusing hunger and thirst. 2) Stephen: Why would I put myself through this torture? Excellent question. I think I have very good reasons – I believe it is the only way… Read more »
Carlos
Guest
Monique, some more ideas: As you see from the article, women seem to have higher levels of ghrelin. This correlates with what I’ve heard from women trying to fast and having a very hard time. On the subject of thirst: fasting implies not getting water from food. So if your body is accustomed to 3 litres a day of water plus the water coming from food, it is perfectly possible to “confuse” hunger with thirst. Note that it is not you confusing those sensations, it is your brain sending the hunger signal in stead of the thirst signal because it… Read more »
Monique
Guest
Thanks Carlos! I do drink as much as I can when I get the “hunger” pain and it gives momentary relief but I think it is more from having the water in my stomach for a brief time. I think you may be onto something about the high ghrelin levels. My husband fasts with me as he has the same health and weight challenges that I do, and he doesn’t struggle nearly as much. I do have some hope that the ghrelin/leptin situation is improving as this long fast was a little easier than my first one, and my appetite… Read more »
Isabela
Guest

Just saying, beans and sweet potato are too much for my own level of insulin resistance. If I don’t keep the carbs to veggies and nuts, I become violently hungry, with hunger pangs, craving for bread, retain water, weight climbs up, etc. However, keeping carbs low is a nice calm place for my stomach, warm tea is enough to help me skip a meal or two. More than that and I can’t sleep at night 🙁

Walt
Guest

Monique, I did not mean you as in a consciously controlled differentiation, rather a very unconscious thing the brain does. But bravo for the 3 litres of fluids/day. What’s interesting, and I had no prior knowledge of this except hunger comes in waves, is the predictability of when those waves occur. So by looking at the above graphs you could discern when to expect hunger to be at it’s worse. Another trick to consider is to eat something of little to no nutritional value just to put something in your stomach then wait 30 mins.

Lori
Guest

Another thought, Dr. Fuhrman claims that hunger is the gut biome wanting carbs and is not always real hunger. He claims it is the bad bugs prompting you to eat sugar and junk.

While I have no idea if he is correct and I do not follow him, perhaps the issue is your gut bacteria? Certainly worth exploring

Mieke
Guest

I once fasted whilst in hospital. 0 kcal for 14 days. I was given chalk-like pills to chew on twice a day against stomach acidity. Maybe that would help ?

Walt
Guest

I’ve noticed an awful lot of posters asking Dr Fung questions. I used to as well until I realized he either 1) doesn’t follow his blog and/or 2)doesn’t respond to questions. So for those asking him questions, when was the last time he answered you or anyone to your knowledge. Note also, this blog is advertising Diet Doctor, a for profit web site. I believe Dr Fung hangs out there as diet doctor advertises the occasional q&a with Dr Fung.

I could be wrong, this is just my observation over the last year or so. YMMV

wang tao
Guest

I think Dr. Feng ignored the bigger problem of emotional eating , and if you do not solve the emotional eating problem, adhere to fasting is very difficult.

Roger Bird
Guest

Thank you, Dr. Fung.

Jim
Guest

Wonderful post. Thanks again Dr. Fung. I visited the local library with my copies of Dr. Fung’s books. They reviewed them and ordered a copy of each for their collection. I am donating the cost of these books in hopes others will be able to benefit from Dr. Fung’s generous gift of his time and knowledge to all of us.

boris
Guest

looks like fasting works optimally with lower general stress levels which can be achieved via yoga breathing(buteyko breathing method)

I’ve never been this relaxed in a very long time ever since i started breathing much much slower and allow CO2 to accumulate more in my body.

Also exercise and cold showers, quick hyperventilation exercises will stimulate your SNS but afterwards you will relax even more deeply.

U just gotta go with your feeling.

Fasting is so amazing though im doing it for life now. So convenient as well so side effect is less stressing over making food.

Ken Stephens
Guest
There’s no doubt that one adapts to fasting as far as hunger subsidence and the hormones that drive hunger go down, most notably insulin. The GH remark was interesting insofar as with type 2 diabetics we have too much GH and a lack of the opposite hormone, somatostatin, Somatostatin suppresses both insulin and glucagon and the hallmarks of T2DM are excessive levels of both. However, the good news is that in type 2’s at least, fasting brings up somatostatin levels. and this is actually has a lot to do with the reduced insulin secretion from beta cells in the fasted… Read more »
Mathieu
Guest

Although grelin is at its lowest at 9:00, it is also at its highest at 7:00… after the usual longest fast of the day, during the night.

Luke
Guest

Another question I have regards bone broth. Is there a risk of consuming toxic heavy medals such as lead, arsenic, selenium, and cadmium if this is a regular part of your diet?.

Mame
Guest

LOL, the data is certainly showing ‘waves’ but 2 hours (for me) is a really long wave. I am happy to have this information, I was thinking (incorrectly) that the waves were much shorter in time. Now to figure out a way to incorporate this new info.

Doug
Guest
Thanks again, Dr. Fung, for the great blog. In addition to all else, this stuff is simply very interesting! I love the details about how the body actually works. I’ve done one four-day fast, water only, thus far. Felt very good – better than I thought I would. No cold feet or hands, only a very, very slight headache once in a while, practically just a hint of a headache. By the second day I had a good, “loose” feeling – I presume from much less water retention and the beginnings of fat burning; being literally less “inflated” is a… Read more »
Dawn
Guest

@Dr. Fung,

How is ghrelin affected if you are drinking BulletProof Coffee?

Stephen T
Guest

Dawn, I drink coconut oil and find it helps to reduce my appetite.

Will Wilkin
Guest
I definitely agree that hunger during fasting comes in waves that get easier to resist. Honestly I have come to enjoy my fasting days, the mental clarity and high energy are exhilarating! I always wait at least 12 hours after the previous day’s food before a breakfast, and about once a week I fast for 36 hours. I had intended a 4.5 day fast 2 weeks ago but broke it after about 62 hours –as Dr. Fung (and Jimmy Moore) wrote in their book “Complete Guide to Fasting,” you can start and stop a fast at any time, go by… Read more »
Sandra
Guest
This information is life saving for the inconvenience of hunger pangs! I always maintained a normal weight and used to eat a very low fat diet which became a problem because constantly eating resulted in GI problems as well as insomnia. From 2015 LCHF and intermittent fasting became a saviour! Since 2015 I would have a high fat breakfast at around 10am and found that I would stay hungry after breakfast in an attempt to do intermittent fasting and to stretch the fasting period to dinner time at 18h00. I then decided to have a bigger breakfast so that I… Read more »
Erik
Guest

Hello Dr. Fung!

Since fasting increases cortisol, should people engaging in intermittent or extended fasts take extra calcium or other suppliments to offset bone/collagen loss?

Lori
Guest

I have no opinion or medical knowledge on this but you may find this video worthwhile on calcium

https://intensivedietarymanagement.com/category/lectures/other-lectures/

SimpsonsFan
Guest
This is intimately familiar to me. My history is that of naturally fasting (as opposed to making a plan not to eat). For most of my adult life, I was very thin, without any effort on my part. (My BMI ranged from 15.3-16.2 until some time in my 30s.) And while I’ve always known I had a slow metabolism compared to friends my age/size (my BMI is currently around 800), we got to a point of joking that I must not produce much ghrelin, since I am rarely hungry and can easily go ages without eating. (I have gone as… Read more »
Stephen T
Guest

Blimey, interesting. I bet you’re popular with the girls eating lettuce and low-fat rubbish in an attempt to lose weight.

SimpsonsFan
Guest
Stephen T, I’m pretty sure you should wait until you’re over 13 years old to comment. As an accomplished woman with a higher IQ than yours, I find virtually no value in your reply to my comment. You seem filled with hate (and stupidity). But maybe when you’re more mature, you’ll realize that grown-ups attempt to discuss things, share experiences, and learn from each other, rather than immaturely jumping to asinine conclusions and vomiting hate speech in a misguided attempt to make themselves feel superior. You’ll get there, though, li’l fella. Just stay in school and keep applying yourself. You… Read more »
Frank
Guest
Than you Dr Fung for another great post. After your posts I started to do 23 hour fasts every day. I must admit that I too have been worried about muscle loss. In your book OB p239 you state “5. Protein conservation phase (after five days)”. However, in the last graph of this post the the GH is stable at 1 ug/L until 16 hours into the fast and then rises to 3 ug/L by 24 hours. Does this mean that the rise of GH from 1 to 3 ug/L in the first 24 hours is not enough to prevent… Read more »
Vishal
Guest

New post by Dr Fung

Seline
Guest
Hi. I love your posts, however I’ve noticed you only seem to applaud the ketogenic diet, with no regard whatsoever to an high carb low fat diet (really low fat, way less than 20% fat per day). Or even just a plant-based diet. Which means you don’t believe at all that a vegan diet could be healthy. I would like to hear your thought about this, it would be nice to see a well-thought analysis. An analysis not biased by possible misconceptions and prejudices. I’ve seen many doctors and nutritionists saying a plant-based lifestyle is just wrong and that’s just… Read more »
PlantKeto
Guest
Seline, just purely FYI… I am a plant-based/vegan and am currently doing keto. It is early days, but I’ve had the most success in the first couple of weeks of keto than everything else in the past few YEARS(!), save adding cinnamon (a natural insulin sensitizer) to my diet. (Just as an example, I did the ‘Insanity’ program, which promises “a year’s worth of weight loss in 60 days.” I gained 2 pounds.) Remarkably, addressing my insulin production, reducing carb’s, and adding cinnamon, allowed me to lose 20 lbs in 2 months. Sadly, the cinnamon effect plateaued, and it has… Read more »
alejandro heredia
Guest

Which foods or drinks can cut intermittent fasting?

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