Beverages – How to Lose Weight VI

The sugar-sweetened beverage is one of the leading sources of added sugars. This includes all soda pop, sugar sweetened teas, fruit juice, fruit punch, vitamin water, smoothies, shakes, lemonade, chocolate or flavored milk, iced coffee drinks and energy drinks. Hot drinks such as hot chocolate, moccachino, caffé mocha, and sweetened coffee and tea would also be included. Trendy alcoholic drinks add significant amounts of sugar. This includes “Hard’ lemonade, flavored wine coolers, ‘cider’ beers, as well as more traditional drinks such as Bailey’s Irish Cream, margaritas, daiquiris, pina coladas, dessert wines, ice wines, sweet Sherries, and liqueurs. Artificially sweetened drinks, as noted previously are not better than their regular counterparts.

So what is left to drink? The best drink is really just plain or sparkling water. Slices of lemon, orange or cucumber are a refreshing addition. Several traditional and delicious drinks are also available.

Coffee

Legend has it that coffee was discovered by an Ethiopian goatherd that astutely noticed that his goats were extra frisky after eating the red fruit of the coffee tree. After reporting it to a local monastery, monks turned the fruits into a brewed drink to help them stay awake during long hours of prayer. From these legendary beginnings, coffee would spread first through Arab traders to Europe and then America. Today, it is enjoyed almost worldwide with local variations in brewing and drinking methods.

Due to the high caffeine content, it is sometimes considered an unhealthy habit. However, recent research has come to the opposite conclusion. Coffee is a major source of antioxidants. It is also a rich source of magnesium and lignans which are suggested to benefit many different areas of human health.

Coffee appears to have a protective role against type 2 Diabetes. In a 2009 review, each additional daily cup of coffee lowered the risk of diabetes by 7%, even up to six cups per day. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) sub study estimated that drinking at least 3 cups of tea or coffee daily reduced the risk of diabetes by 42%.   The Singapore Chinese Health Study showed a 30% reduction in risk for more than 4 cups per day of coffee. This protection is evident even in decaffeinated coffees, suggesting that much of the benefit derives from antioxidants.

Coffee appears to reduce total mortality as well. A large 2012 analysis of the AARP Diet and Health Study found total mortality reduced by 10-15% in those drinking six cups of coffee. Other large-scale studies such as the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow Up Study found that most major causes of death, including heart disease were reduced. Coffee may guard against the neurologic diseases Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Store beans in an airtight container away from excessive moisture, heat and light. Flavor is lost quickly after grinding, so investing in a reliable grinder is worthwhile. Grind beans immediately before brewing. On hot days, iced coffee is simple and inexpensive to make. Simply brew a pot of regular coffee and cool in the refrigerator overnight. Cinnamon, coconut oil, vanilla extract, almond extract and cream may be used to flavor coffee without changing its healthy nature. Avoid adding sugars or sweeteners.

Tea

 Legend holds that the Emperor of China discovered tea in 2737 BC. He had been enjoying a cup of boiled water when leaves from a nearby tree blew into his drink. As the water changed color, the emperor sipped the brew and was surprised by the pleasant taste. For centuries afterwards, royalty enjoyed tea for its medicinal and religious purposes. Tea spread to Japan in the 6th century, where green tea would be developed and popularized. Tea did not reach English shores until the 17th century, where it gained popularity among the aristocratic class.

After water, tea is the most popular beverage in the world. There are several basic tea varieties. Black tea is the most common, making up almost 75% of global consumption. Harvested leaves are fully fermented giving it the characteristic black color. Black tea tends to be higher in caffeine. Oolong tea is ‘semi-fermented’ meaning that it undergoes a shorter period of fermentation. Green tea is a ‘non-fermented’ tea. The freshly harvested leaves immediately undergo a steaming process to stop fermentation, giving it a much more delicate and floral taste. Green tea is naturally much lower in caffeine than coffee, which makes this drink ideal for those who are sensitive to its stimulant effects.

Green tea owes much of its beneficial effects due to large concentrations of a group of powerful antioxidants called catechins, notably one called EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate). Fermentation changes the catechins to a variety of theaflavins, making green tea a richer source than black or oolong teas. The theaflavins in black tea may also have beneficial health effects, although different from those of green tea. The antioxidant potential of green tea and black tea are comparable. Polyphenols in the tea are also believed to boost metabolism, which may aid in ‘fat burning’. Many health benefits have been ascribed to green tea consumption, including increased fat oxidation during exercise, increased resting energy expenditure (34), lower risk of various types of cancer.

A meta-analysis of studies confirms that green tea helps with weight loss, although the benefit is rather modest in the range of 1-2 kg. Catechins may play a role in inhibiting carbohydrate digestive enzymes resulting in lower glucose levels, and protecting the pancreatic beta cell. The Singapore Chinese Health study showed that drinking more than one cup of black tea per day reduced the risk of diabetes by 14%. Other studies demonstrated an 18% decrease in the risk of Type 2 Diabetes for those drinking 3-4 cups per day.

All teas may be enjoyed both as hot or cold beverages. There are infinite varieties of tea available to suit any taste. Flavors can be added with the addition of lemon peel, orange peel, cinnamon, cardamom, vanilla pods, mint and ginger may all be added to any type of tea.

Herbal teas are infusions of herbs, spices or other plant matter in hot water. They make excellent drinks without added sugars, and can be enjoyed hot or cold. These are not true teas since they do not contain tea leaves. The varieties are endless. Some popular varieties include mint, chamomile, ginger, lavender, lemon balm, hibiscus, and rosehip teas. The addition of cinnamon or other spices can enhance the flavor.

Bone Broth

Virtually every culture’s culinary traditions include the nutritious and delicious bone broth. Animal bones are simmered with the addition of vegetables, herbs and spices for flavoring. The long simmering time (4-48 hours) releases most of the minerals, gelatin and nutrients. The addition of a small amount of vinegar during cooking helps leach some of the stored minerals. Bone broths are very high in amino acids such as proline, arginine and glycine as well as minerals such as calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.

Animal bones are often available at ethnic grocery stores and fairly inexpensive. They are also very convenient, requiring little preparation time. They can be made in large batches and frozen. Upon cooling, broth may congeal like Jello due to the high gelatin content. Most commercially prepared broths have nothing in common with the homemade variety. Prepackaged broths often rely on artificial flavors and MSG to provide taste. The minerals, nutrients and gelatin are not present in many canned broths.

Next article:  Wheat – How To Lose Weight VII

Start here with Calories I – How Do We Gain Weight?

2019-01-10T09:45:17-04:0025 Comments

About the Author:

Dr. Fung is a Toronto based kidney specialist, having graduated from the University of Toronto and finishing his medical specialty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001. He is the author of the bestsellers ‘The Obesity Code’ and ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’. He has pioneered the use of therapeutic fasting for weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal in his IDM clinic.

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Michael Dolan
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Michael Dolan

Will fasting work for me? I was diagnosed with diabetes last year. I am thin now and have never been overweight.

Carine
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Carine

Hi Michael, how old are you? Were you diagnosed as Type 1 or Type 2 DM? This is important as the underlying pathology with Type1 is too little insulin and is usually diagnosed in young people even young children. Type1 patients are usually underweight or normal weight. Type 2 is caused by too much insulin and these persons are usually overweight. Type1 results from disease of the pancreas causing it to produce less insulin than needed. Type 2 results from eating food with too much carbohydrates in persons with carbohydrate resistance.

hana
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hana

my blood sugar level fasting is 117, should i get worried? can I revers it?
thanks

JOAN
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JOAN

My body urine alkalinity reading is 5.5, I’m told it should be about 7.5 or so.
How can i raise it.

Also read that cancer growth slows in a alkaline condition, any truth to that.
Thanks

kfacwpup
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Urine pH is regulated quite tightly into a narrow range, usually 4.5-8.0. I have checked, literally thousands of urine pH values. 5 -6 is about standard.

Vic Espiritu
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Vic Espiritu

Hi JOAN, your reading of 5.5 is low, you’re right when somebody told you it should be 7.3 or 7.5. You can absolutely increase your alkaline by eating green leafy vegetables, but if you are not a vegetable eater you may drink water with Baking Soda and you’ll get instant result. Here’s the formula: Fill only 1/2 water into your glass then add 1/2 or 1 Teaspoon of Baking Soda ( note: Baking Soda and NOT baking powder, they’re two different stuff ) then mix, drink straight and follow up with more water, the Baking Soda is a bit salty… Read more »

Christoph Dollis
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What absurd quack nonsense, Vic.

lisa P
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lisa P

Actually Vic is not absurd. I suffer from a bladder condition that is incurable called Interstitial Cystitis and my urologist has me drinking water with baking soda twice per day to control the PH of my urine that seems to keep my bladder very irritated.

Dena Mott
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Dena Mott

So thankful you. I have been type 2 diabetic now for almost three years. I just found your program on fasting. My blood sugars are running 300 most of the time for a while now. I am doing the fast for first day today. I can’t seem to find everything on exactly what to do while on fast. And then on eat days. Still researching all the info I can find on you. I knew what you were saying was the truth even before I found you online..in regards to giving insulin makes things worse gradually. That is why I… Read more »

RichardC Batty
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RichardC Batty

How about sugar free sodas? I am hoping it will be similar drinking water.

Please don’t mention any studies sponsored by the sugar lobby.

kfacwpup
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I don’t recommend any artificial sweeteners. Chemicals that happen to be sweet and not kill you probably are not good for you. See this post “The Diet Soda Delusion

Jônatas Silveira de Andrade
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Jônatas Silveira de Andrade

Dr. Fung, what about natural sweeteners, like Stevia?

David
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David

Hi Dr. Fung, I was wondering when you one starts to fast for type 2 DM, should one stop medication for that day?

Also the intermittent fasting, is that like 24 hrs or so for each fast, and like how many times a week?

kfacwpup
Member

Generally yes, but your physician needs to guide your medication dosage. IF can be done in many ways. We often use 24 hr fasts 2-3 times per week but all regimens are individualized.

r.king
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r.king

Hello Dr. I can’t find any videos that talk about when to fast for how long and what should be ate while fasting and not fasting can you give some details. I was just told I’m type 2 and I have an appointment Tuesday. The ER dr. Gave me 30 days of metformin but said it could harm my liver. So I came up on your video when trying to learn how to use my meter. Thank you in advance.

kfacwpup
Member

Everybody is different and therefore I don’t give specific fasting directions. It should also be done under medical supervision especially if you are on medications. Fasting can be done anywhere from 24 hours to several weeks. It can be done once in a while to 2-3 x/week to daily.

Karin Devlin
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Karin Devlin

Dear Dr Fung,
I like to have a glass of wine or a non sweet drink like Captain Morgan mixed with fresh lime juice almost every day but not when I’m fasting of course. I’m not diabetic but would like to loose 5-8lb. Does alcohol raise your insulin levels?

Vicky McCombie
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Vicky McCombie

Reply to Karin Devlin – Read this report entitled ‘Ethanol causes acute inhibition of carbohydrate, fat, and protein oxidation and insulin resistance’ – its pretty technical but the last 2 sentences are understandable to non scientists – I quote:

‘We conclude that ethanol was a preferred fuel preventing fat, and to lesser degrees, CHO and protein, from being oxidized. It also caused acute insulin resistance which was compensated for by hypersecretion of insulin.

Link is http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3280601

I would very much like Dr Fungs thoughts if possible, please.

Juan Bucio
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Juan Bucio

could I drink lemon tea or would that be considered breaking fast? I am talking about one-half of a lemon with a cup of hot water. I just started a water fast about two days ago this being my third but drank lemon tea in the morning when I get to work.

Elaine
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Elaine

I am wondering about drinks like “Bai”, which are sweetened with Stevia and Erythritol (a sugar alcohol)? These are not alcoholic drinks and I’d read the sugar alhocols don’t raise blood sugar, but I’m wondering about insulin levels. My guess is “yes”, since I have read Dr. Fung doesn’t recommend stevia for this reason.

Connie Cason
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Connie Cason

Does caffeine cause high insulin levels? I have heard that it does and I have heard that it doesn’t. I am so confused about it.

Ruth
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Ruth

Hi Dr Fung, Thank you very much for your articles in fasting and LCHF which I have been reading with avid interest. Because of this I have begun eating only one meal a day for the past two weeks now with no negative side effects. As a Pacific Islander, I am wondering about your thoughts on warmed coconut milk (freshly squeezed) with fresh tumeric and ginger root as a beverage. Is this considered a fat or a carb – would it be allowed on fast days? Also, young and mature coconut flesh – fat? carb? fibre? I see you mention… Read more »

Karl
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Karl

Unfortunately coffee raises Insulin. Is it better to quit it?

Jacqueline Cory
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Jacqueline Cory

Dr. Fung,
I recently read about hibiscus leaves curing T2D. What are your thoughts on these claims?

Melanie
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Melanie

Will fasting work for me? I have type 2 Diabetes and I experience the dawn phenomenon (sugar entering bloodstream as a result of the liver aiding my system, between approx. 2:00 am – 6:00 am while I’m sleeping).